Versions conference, EnsadLab, Paris, September 2016

On Wednesday, September 7th and 14th, between 10 am and 7 pm, Thierry Fournier, J. Emil Sennewald and the research group Displays – EnsadLab, EnsAD research Laboratory, Paris, invite you to take part in the discussions: “What do we expect of exhibitions?” as part of the international workshop-conference Versions which will be held at the Maison Populaire de Montreuil.

What becomes of the exhibition, especially in the context of post-digital cultures?Versions, which will take place over the course of two weeks (Sept 5th – 16th), is an international practice, debate and critique workshop-conference to experiment and discuss exhibition forms. It is organized by the Displays research group led by Thierry Fournier and J. Emil Sennewald at EnsadLab, research laboratory of the École nationale supérieure des Arts Décoratifs, Paris – which addresses the exhibition itself as a research situation.

Unlike a curatorial approach starting from a given project to organize works, Versions will take as its starting point suggestions made by stakeholders themselves, in order to reveal an experimentation of the exhibition’s “conditions of possibility”. Participants will work in groups of three for three days: two workshop days and one day of public debates. The process will be documented in real time and a publication will be edited after the event, in late 2016.

Fourteen guests will occupy a single space to conduct experiments in situ, and participate in public meetings and demonstrations: Martin John Callanan, artist, Eli Commins, artist, coordinator for digital policy at French Culture Ministry, Jean Cristofol, philosopher and teacher-researcher at Ecole Supérieure d’Art d’Aix en Provence, Milad Doueihi, historian and chairman for Digital humanities at University Paris-Sorbonne, Laura Gozlan, artist, Yuk Hui, philosopher, associated researcher at the Center for Digital Cultures, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Jan Kopp, artist, teacher (Esacm Clermont-Ferrand), Claire Malrieux, artist, teacher (Ensci, Beaux-arts Hauts-de France) and researcher at EnsadLab, Guilhem Pratz, director and producer, Gaïaland, Mathilde Roman, art critic, curator and teacher-researcher at Pavillon Bosio, Ecole supérieure d’Art de Monaco, Véronique Souben, curator and head of FRAC Haute-Normandie, Ann Stouvenel, curator and head for visual arts at Mains d’Œuvres, Pau Waelder, art critic and curator, Marion Zilio, art critic, curator and head of Young International Artists art fair. This workshop will be held at Maison Populaire de Montreuil, in dialogue with the venue’s team and with Vladimir Demoule and Marie Koch, the 2016 season exhibition curators.We would be delighted if you would consider your participation in this workshop conference’s public meetings on Wednesdays, September 7th and 16th, between 10 am and 7pm. You are cordially invited to weigh in on what you expect of exhibitions today. Please note: your RSVP is required at displays@ensad.fr

More info about Displays and the participants: www.displays.ensadlab.fr
Maison Populaire de Montreuil, 9 bis rue Dombasle 93100 Montreuil, France: map
EnsadLab: www.ensadlab.fr

An event co-organized by the Displays research group, EnsadLab Research Laboratory, coordinated by Thierry Fournier (artist and curator, EnsadLab, Endsad Nancy) and J. Emil Sennewald (art critic and journalist, Esacm, EnsadLab) and the ICCA Labex. EnsadLab / Displays researchers: Gaspard Bébié-Valérian, Thomas Cheneseau, Dorian Reunkrilerk, associated researcher Pauline Gourlet (designer and postgraduate Université Paris 8) and Rahaf Demaskhi (artiste et doctorante University Rennes 2). Thanks to Annie Agopian, Floriane Benjamin, Marie Koch, Vladimir Demoule and the Maison Populaire de Montreuil team.

Each and Every Command, Baltic39

Each and Every Command

Each and Every Command is a new artwork – twelve years in the making – on show for the first time this week at Baltic39, Newcastle.

Each and Every Command documents, as on ongoing archive, over twelve years of edits I have made in the popular image editing software Adobe Photoshop (from version 8). Presented in readable text, each and every action, edit, change, mistake, or creation that I have made to my own work, and on behalf of other people, on any computer, from 23 December 2003 until today is recorded in unredacted form. Printed as one complete copy over 15,873 pages on mid-grey A4 paper and bound within eleven archive folders, the 27,504,497 million characters comprise 4,114,676 words over 198,605 lines of text. Equivalent to eight times the Complete Works of William Shakespeare.

To celebrate the first exhibition of the archive, the full record is now available in the Amazon Kindle Store, as the largest ebook ever released. For the next five days, the duration of the Baltic 39 exhibition, the ebook will be free to download.

Data in the 21st Century, V2 Rotterdam

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Data in the 21st Century explores the friction between the unpredictable reality that we live in and the desire to capture it in data.

19 December 2015 – 14 February 2016
V2_ Institute For The Unstable Media, Eendrachtsstraat 10, 3012 XL, Rotterdam

The capitalist belief that profit-seeking is the best way to manage and develop societies has sparked an unprecedented desire to abstract and quantify everything into data. In the pursuit of economic efficiency, data is money, data is power, data is everything and everything is data. Yet data is contingent on a world that is messy, irrational, unstable, and emotional. The rise of so-called big data and the emergence of technologies that are able to quantify our every move, preference and behaviour, have demonstrated where the friction lies between the unpredictable reality that we live in and the desire to capture it in data. The public program Data in the 21st Century will explore how this friction has changed and shaped our relationship to data and seeks to discuss how this relationship will develop in the future.

Featured Artists
Kyle McDonald
Lev Manovich, Daniel Goddemeyer, Moritz Stefaner & Dominikus Baur
Martin John Callanan
Timo Arnall
Informal Strategies
Lane/You/Debackere
PWR Studio
Max Dovey & Manetta Berends

http://v2.nl/events/data-in-the-21st-century

Bank of England, Data visualisation competition

The Bank of England has announced the winner of its first data visualisation competition.
The competition, launched as part of the Bank’s One Bank Research Agenda, asked competitors to create a novel or insightful visual representation of Bank data sets that were made publicly available for the first time.
The winning entry from Cath Sleeman, showed an interactive web based visualisation of “Recessions and Recoveries”. This visualisation explored how the UK’s most recent recession, and subsequent recovery, compared to recessions in other countries and to previous recessions in the UK. She was awarded a £5000 prize.

All the shortlisted entries can be seen on the Bank’s website.

The announcement was made as part of a finalists’ day at which shortlisted entrants presented their visualisation to a panel including Chief Economist, Andy Haldane; Chairman of the NATO Research Task Group on visual analytics, Margaret Varga; Artist and author of Data Soliloquies, Martin Callanan; and Advanced Analytics Analyst, Lyndsey Pereira-Brereton.

Deputy Governor, Ben Broadbent, announced the winner. He said:
“The calibre of entrants to this competition has been extremely high. The original and creative use of our data – which we’ve made available to the public for the first time – has been inspiring as well as illuminating. I’d like to congratulate all those who entered the competition.

We launched this competition as a way of opening the Bank up to the broader research community. The high quality of the submissions received demonstrates the exciting new possibilities in the field of data visualisation.

Congratulations to Cath Sleeman on the outstanding use of our three centuries of macroeconomic data. It provided a fascinating perspective on the pattern of economic cycles in the UK and other countries.”

Cath Sleeman said:
“I entered the Bank’s data visualisation competition because I really enjoy analysing and visualising new and interesting data sets. My entry aims to contextualise the UK’s recent recession, by comparing it to recessions in other countries and to past recessions in the UK. I was surprised by the way in which the recent recession resembles a recession that took place one hundred years earlier, in 1908. The 1908 recession triggered a similar sized fall in GDP and was also accompanied by a weak recovery in productivity. I am extremely grateful to the Bank for running the competition. It was great to meet the other finalists and to learn more about the Bank’s Advanced Analytics unit.”

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/publications/Documents/news/2015/054.pdf

Discursive Objects, Van Abbe Museum, Eindhoven

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17-25 October 2015, 11h – 18h
Gagelstraat 44, 5616RR, EIndhoven

Aldo Bakker, Maarten Baas, David Bernstein, Martin John Callanan, Chmara Rosinke, Sarah Daher & guests, The Grantchester Pottery, Richard Healy, Anton Hjertstedt, Vincent Knopper, Pieteke Korte, Nynke Koster, Pottery Yacht Club, Corinne Mynatt, n-o-m-a-n, Studio Minale Maeda, Superstudio

The first exhibition for Work at Home situates art, design, and transdisciplinary practices in the home space. In what might be a likely setting for ‘design’, outside of the white cube it presents an alternate context for how we experience contemporary art today. The presentation of ‘art’ and ‘design’ suggests a mutual inclusion of both devices which we use to frame human experience.

Beyond ‘home exhibition’ histories, the structure of the visitor experience is as a lived-in space, and presents potentials of what a contemporary collection of art and design might look like today. Presenting in the home creates a new paradigm that explores the evolving publicisation of our private space.

Press release PDF

http://wah.gallery

Hearts & Minds: new artwork for Dundee

Create a Single Functioning Human Heart from Two Distinct Human Genomes

Hannah Maclure Centre
Preview: Friday 11 September 2015, 6-8pm

Exhibition runs until Friday 23 October 2015

Hearts’ is an exhibition that explores scientific and artistic research relating to our life-giving organ, examining local ground-breaking heart disease research and sharing the work of internationally renowned artists whose practice is concerned with the heart in transplantation, the heart as a system, the heart as a poetic object.

The exhibition arises from an ongoing body of cardiovascular research led by Dr Nikolai Zhelev at Abertay University. Miniature beating hearts are developed from human stem cells reprogrammed to grow has tiny heart organs which are then used to investigate preventions and cures of heart disease.

Featuring the work of artists Catherine Richards, Ingrid Bachmann, Martin John Callanan and Jennifer Kelly.

Martin John Callanan will reflect aspects of central banking, economics, finance and data through conceptual art

08 July 2015

​Available as: PDF

With 11 days to go for the public to nominate a visual artist to feature on the next £20 bank note, the Bank is pleased to deepen its collaboration with visual arts through the arrival of artist Martin John Callanan, who will be working at the Bank over the next twelve months on a series of conceptual art projects. Mr Callanan’s work – which will be generously funded by the Leverhulme Trust and University College London – will reflect aspects of central banking, economics, finance and data.

Mr. Callanan – a Teaching Fellow at UCL’s Slade School of Fine Art and current holder of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Visual and Performing Art – researches and creates artwork to better understand how societies and individuals interact with technological, political, economic, environmental and other systems. His work, exhibited and published internationally, expresses complex ideas relating to these systems in tangible, accessible ways.

Working with the Bank of England will provide Mr. Callanan a unique opportunity to expand his research into financial services and economics, and to collaborate with economists, mathematicians and computer scientists at the Bank and beyond.

Through the exhibition of these finished artworks, this collaboration will also provide the Bank with a unique opportunity – to raise awareness and broaden public understanding of our mission to promote the good of the people of the United Kingdom by maintaining monetary and financial stability.

The Bank renewed its mission as part of the launch of its Strategic Plan in March 2014. Core priorities as part of this Plan included: opening up the Bank’s research and analytical work to external contributions – and its data sets to the public – in order to benefit from external points of view; partnering with outside academic researchers to develop advanced data and research capabilities; encouraging diversity in all forms, including promoting and encouraging diversity of thinking and experience; and building public understanding of the Bank’s responsibilities for maintaining monetary and financial stability.

The Bank’s collaboration with Mr. Callanan will help to further each of these priorities, and builds on other successful Strategic Plan initiatives to date – including the launch of a One Bank Research Agenda, a data visualisation competition and our new Bank Underground staff blog.

It is also timely, given the next £20 banknote will celebrate Britain’s achievements in the visual arts. Since 19 May 2015, the public have been invited to nominate historic visual artists they would like to see on the £20 note, to be released by 2020. Thousands of nominations have been received so far – underlining the extent of British achievement in the visual arts and reinforcing why this field deserves to be recognised on the next £20 note. The public has until 19 July 2015 to make their nominations on the Bank’s website.

Welcoming Mr. Callanan’s presence at the Bank, Governor Mark Carney said:

“Today’s announcement brings together three recent themes of the Bank’s work. The financial crisis has taught us that we must look beyond the conventional, and approach policy issues with creativity, audacity, and diverse thinking. Harnessing the power of Big Data will allow for new patterns, new trends, and ultimately, new answers to age-old questions. And as we move towards celebrating the visual arts on our new £20 bank note, we also reflect on how the visual arts can help us deliver on our mission to promote the good of the people of the United Kingdom. On behalf of the Bank, I warmly welcome Martin Callanan, I look forward to seeing the results of his work, and I thank the Leverhulme Trust and University College London for generously sponsoring his work.”

Read on Bank of England website
PDF

I Cannot Not Communicate at Vitsœ New York

I Cannot Not Communicate, Martin John Callanan at Vitsœ New York: 14–19 May
33 Bond Street
New York NY 10012
T 1 917 675 6990
newyork@vitsoe.com

At Vitsœ we like to share the work of creative people. So when Berlin and UK-based artist (and Vitsœ customer), Martin John Callanan, asked to show a new piece for the first time at our New York shop, we were happy to oblige.

I Cannot Not Communicate, consists of the top 100 books recommended to Callanan by Amazon, based on everything he read and bought since the online retail giant first launched its recommendation algorithm over 15 years ago.

The books are displayed on our trusted shelves, with chairs and tables to ensure your time interacting with the artwork is a comfortable one.

The event will take place during a busy time with New York design week and Frieze Art Fair New York occupying the city – all the more reason to take a moment to pause in comfort at our New York shop at 33 Bond Street.

To accompany the installation, Callanan has produced a pamphlet, including a text by Marialaura Ghidini. A limited number of copies are available free to visitors.

Martin John Callanan is an artist researching an individual’s place within systems. Recent solo exhibitions include Noshowspace, London, Horrach Moya, Palma and Or Gallery, Berlin. His work has been shown at White Cube, James Cohan Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Whitstable Biennale and Imperial War Museum. He is recipient of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Visual Art.

Screen Shot 2015-04-23 at 23.36.19

 

 

Die Zusammenarbeit mit kreativen Köpfen macht uns immer wieder Freude. Als uns der in Berlin und Großbritannien lebende Künstler (und Vitsœ Kunde) Martin John Callanan fragte, ob er seine neue Arbeit in unserem New Yorker Shop ausstellen könne, sagten wir ohne Zögern zu.

„I Cannot Not Communicate“ besteht aus den ersten 100 Büchern, die Callanan von Amazon vorgeschlagen wurden – basierend auf allem, was er gekauft und gelesen hatte, seit der Onlineshop-Gigant vor mehr als 15 Jahren seinen Algorithmus für Kaufempfehlungen einführte.

Ausgestellt werden die Bücher in unseren bewährten Regalen. Unsere Sessel und Tische sorgen dafür, dass es beim Kunstgenuss nicht an Komfort mangelt.

Die Ausstellung findet während der trubeligen Zeit der New York Design Week und der Kunstmesse Frieze statt – gönnen Sie sich eine kleine Auszeit von der Geschäftigkeit in unserem New Yorker Shop in der Bond Street 33.

Begleitend zur Ausstellung hat Callanan im Riso-Druckverfahren ein Pamphlet produziert, unter anderem mit einem Text von Marialaura Ghidini. Eine limitierte Auflage können geneigte Besucher kostenlos mitnehmen.

Martin John Callanan sucht nach individuellen Wegen im Kunstbetrieb. Seine jüngsten Solo-Ausstellungen fanden im Noshowspace, London, Horrach Moya, Palma und der Or Gallery, Berlin statt. Seine Werke wurden gezeigt von Institutionen wie White Cube, James Cohan Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Whitstable Biennale und dem Imperial War Museum. Er ist ausgezeichnet worden mit dem Philip Leverhulme Prize für Bildende Kunst.

Philip Leverhulme Prize 2013

the-leverhulme-trust-logo

Leverhulme Awards Recognise Rising Stars of Research

Martin John Callanan has been awarded the triennial Philip Leverhulme Prize in Visual Art 2014-17.

This year, the Leverhulme Trust awarded 29 Philip Leverhulme Prizes to recognise researchers at an early stage of their career, whose work has already had a significant international impact, and whose future research career is exceptionally promising. Prize winners receive an award of £70,000 over three years, which may be used for any research purpose. Nominations are accepted for work across 18 broad disciplines, with prizes in six of these disciplines offered each year.

The prizes recognise the achievements of researchers at an early stage of their career, whose work has already made an international impression, and whose future research holds exceptional promise.

The prizes were established to commemorate the contribution of Philip Leverhulme, the Third Viscount Leverhulme and former trustee, to the work of the Leverhulme Trust.

Twenty-nine prizes have been awarded across six disciplines (Astronomy and Astrophysics, Economics, Engineering, Geography, Modern Languages and Literature and Performing and Visual Arts).

Full list of awards (PDF) or awardee’s biographies (PDF)
Leverhulme Trust website

Slade School of Fine Art

UCL Provost

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