Data in the 21st Century, V2 Rotterdam

v2-data

Data in the 21st Century explores the friction between the unpredictable reality that we live in and the desire to capture it in data.

19 December 2015 – 14 February 2016
V2_ Institute For The Unstable Media, Eendrachtsstraat 10, 3012 XL, Rotterdam

The capitalist belief that profit-seeking is the best way to manage and develop societies has sparked an unprecedented desire to abstract and quantify everything into data. In the pursuit of economic efficiency, data is money, data is power, data is everything and everything is data. Yet data is contingent on a world that is messy, irrational, unstable, and emotional. The rise of so-called big data and the emergence of technologies that are able to quantify our every move, preference and behaviour, have demonstrated where the friction lies between the unpredictable reality that we live in and the desire to capture it in data. The public program Data in the 21st Century will explore how this friction has changed and shaped our relationship to data and seeks to discuss how this relationship will develop in the future.

Featured Artists
Kyle McDonald
Lev Manovich, Daniel Goddemeyer, Moritz Stefaner & Dominikus Baur
Martin John Callanan
Timo Arnall
Informal Strategies
Lane/You/Debackere
PWR Studio
Max Dovey & Manetta Berends

http://v2.nl/events/data-in-the-21st-century

Bank of England, Data visualisation competition

The Bank of England has announced the winner of its first data visualisation competition.
The competition, launched as part of the Bank’s One Bank Research Agenda, asked competitors to create a novel or insightful visual representation of Bank data sets that were made publicly available for the first time.
The winning entry from Cath Sleeman, showed an interactive web based visualisation of “Recessions and Recoveries”. This visualisation explored how the UK’s most recent recession, and subsequent recovery, compared to recessions in other countries and to previous recessions in the UK. She was awarded a £5000 prize.

All the shortlisted entries can be seen on the Bank’s website.

The announcement was made as part of a finalists’ day at which shortlisted entrants presented their visualisation to a panel including Chief Economist, Andy Haldane; Chairman of the NATO Research Task Group on visual analytics, Margaret Varga; Artist and author of Data Soliloquies, Martin Callanan; and Advanced Analytics Analyst, Lyndsey Pereira-Brereton.

Deputy Governor, Ben Broadbent, announced the winner. He said:
“The calibre of entrants to this competition has been extremely high. The original and creative use of our data – which we’ve made available to the public for the first time – has been inspiring as well as illuminating. I’d like to congratulate all those who entered the competition.

We launched this competition as a way of opening the Bank up to the broader research community. The high quality of the submissions received demonstrates the exciting new possibilities in the field of data visualisation.

Congratulations to Cath Sleeman on the outstanding use of our three centuries of macroeconomic data. It provided a fascinating perspective on the pattern of economic cycles in the UK and other countries.”

Cath Sleeman said:
“I entered the Bank’s data visualisation competition because I really enjoy analysing and visualising new and interesting data sets. My entry aims to contextualise the UK’s recent recession, by comparing it to recessions in other countries and to past recessions in the UK. I was surprised by the way in which the recent recession resembles a recession that took place one hundred years earlier, in 1908. The 1908 recession triggered a similar sized fall in GDP and was also accompanied by a weak recovery in productivity. I am extremely grateful to the Bank for running the competition. It was great to meet the other finalists and to learn more about the Bank’s Advanced Analytics unit.”

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/publications/Documents/news/2015/054.pdf

Discursive Objects, Van Abbe Museum, Eindhoven

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17-25 October 2015, 11h – 18h
Gagelstraat 44, 5616RR, EIndhoven

Aldo Bakker, Maarten Baas, David Bernstein, Martin John Callanan, Chmara Rosinke, Sarah Daher & guests, The Grantchester Pottery, Richard Healy, Anton Hjertstedt, Vincent Knopper, Pieteke Korte, Nynke Koster, Pottery Yacht Club, Corinne Mynatt, n-o-m-a-n, Studio Minale Maeda, Superstudio

The first exhibition for Work at Home situates art, design, and transdisciplinary practices in the home space. In what might be a likely setting for ‘design’, outside of the white cube it presents an alternate context for how we experience contemporary art today. The presentation of ‘art’ and ‘design’ suggests a mutual inclusion of both devices which we use to frame human experience.

Beyond ‘home exhibition’ histories, the structure of the visitor experience is as a lived-in space, and presents potentials of what a contemporary collection of art and design might look like today. Presenting in the home creates a new paradigm that explores the evolving publicisation of our private space.

Press release PDF

http://wah.gallery

Alumnus of the Year for Excellence in Arts, Birmingham City University

Alumnus of the Year for Excellence in Arts

Martin John Callanan has been awarded Alumnus of the Year 2015 by Birmingham City University for Excellence in the Arts.

Birmingham City University Alumni of the Year recognises and celebrates the outstanding achievements of Birmingham City University graduates. Our alumni make a real difference across the globe in a variety of ways, and the University seeks to acknowledge their contribution to the local, national and international communities through Alumni of the Year.

Birmingham City University
Watch the whole Ceremony on Youtube or Watch from Award speech at 1h36m

Hearts & Minds: new artwork for Dundee

Create a Single Functioning Human Heart from Two Distinct Human Genomes

Hannah Maclure Centre
Preview: Friday 11 September 2015, 6-8pm

Exhibition runs until Friday 23 October 2015

Hearts’ is an exhibition that explores scientific and artistic research relating to our life-giving organ, examining local ground-breaking heart disease research and sharing the work of internationally renowned artists whose practice is concerned with the heart in transplantation, the heart as a system, the heart as a poetic object.

The exhibition arises from an ongoing body of cardiovascular research led by Dr Nikolai Zhelev at Abertay University. Miniature beating hearts are developed from human stem cells reprogrammed to grow has tiny heart organs which are then used to investigate preventions and cures of heart disease.

Featuring the work of artists Catherine Richards, Ingrid Bachmann, Martin John Callanan and Jennifer Kelly.

I’M Ten exhibition and Paddle8 auction at IMT

4 September – 2 October 2015

Preview: Thursday 3 September 6 – 9pm
Auction launch: Thursday 17 September from 6pm GMT
Auction Ends: Friday 2 October at 9pm
Auction closing party: Friday 2 October 6 – 9pm

I’M Ten is a benefit auction and exhibition of over 150 emerging and established artists, brought together to celebrate IMT Gallery’s 10 year anniversary. All artworks will be auctioned off on Paddle8 at a starting price of £50 from the 17th of September – 2nd October 2015.

We are grateful to our I’M Ten nominators for their thoughtful artist selections. They include: Oreet Ashery (Artist), Stuart Brisley (Artist), Mark Doyle (Independent Art Consultant), Elisabetta Fabrizi (Curator, Tyneside Cinema), Kenneth Goldsmith (Poet and Founding Editor of UbuWeb), Sean Griffiths (Architect and Founder of FAT), Kelly Large (Curator, Zabludowicz Collection), Ana Ventura Miranda (Director, Arte Institute) and Aura Satz (Artist).

Since its opening as a non-profit gallery, IMT Gallery has built a reputation for its innovative site-specific installations as well as its championing of sound art and of artists working across media. The sale of works in I’M Ten, all of which have been kindly donated by participating artists, raises funds to continue to support IMT Gallery’s ambitious public and curatorial programming, as well as towards building new resources for supporting artists.

Follow the exhibition and auction on #IMTen2015

Artists included:
AAS, Larry Achiampong, Rupert Ackroyd, Thorbjørn Andersen, Daniela Antonelli, Sol Archer, Athanasios Argianas, Cristina Ataíde, Alex Baker, Alison Ballard, Darren Banks, Beagles and Ramsay, Felix Bernstein, Antoine Bertin, David Blandy, Aline Bouvy, Uma Breakdown, Nicholas Brooks, Harry Burke, David Burrows, Martin John Callanan, Sarah Carne, Marco Cazzella, Rómulo Celdrán, Adam Chodzko, Rachael Clewlow, Maia Conran, Cecilia Corrigan, John Cussans, Charles Danby, Matthew de Kersaint Giraudeau, Claire Dorsett, Luke Drozd, Graham Dunning, Simon Faithfull, Marcia Farquhar, Brian Fay, Joe Fletcher Orr, Beth Fox, Margarita Gluzberg, Katie Goodwin, Joe Graham, Oona Grimes, Tina Gverovic, Mark Harris, Joey Holder, Rowena Hughes, Helena Hunter, Atsuhide Ito, Mat Jenner, Sophie Jung, Nick Kennedy, Dean Kenning, Lotte Rose Kjær Skau, Kristen Kreider and James O’Leary, Kamil Kuskowski, Jessica Labatte, Dominique Lämmli, Rachel Lancaster, Sophia Le Fraga, Richard Squires, Sasha Litvintseva, Daniel Locke, Kevin Logan, Lynn Lu, Marcin Luczkowski, David Lytzhøft, Sally Madge, Martim Meirelles, Luke McCreadie, Aidan McNeill, Melanie Manchot, Harry Meadley, Lindsey Mendick, Rosa Menkman, Paulina Michnowska, Karen Mirza, Matt Moser-Clark, Harriet Murray, Idit Nathan, Natacha Nisic, Flore Nové-Josserand, Eva O’Leary, Aki Onda, 0rphan Drift, Tom O’Sullivan & Joanne Tatham, Miguel Palma, Maria Papadomanolaki, Mathew Parkin, Flora Parrott, Berry Patten, Isabel Pavão, Laura Pawela, Will Peck, Pil and Galia Kollectiv, Manuela Pimentel, Patricia Pinsker, Plastique Fantastique, Maeve Rendle, Hyun-Min Ryu, Andreas Rasmussen, Richard Rigg, Sam Risley Billingham, Florian Roithmayr, Caroline Rothstein, Giorgio Sadotti, Hannah Sawtell, Henrik Schrat, Erica Scourti, Dallas Seitz, Yinka Shonibare, Gordon Shrigley, Signal To Noise, DJ Simpson, Mark Scott-Wood, Thomas Skov, Amalie Smith, John Smith, Rob Smith, Evangelia Spiliopoulou, Marilia Stagkouraki, David Steans, Eva Stenam, Helen Stratford, NaoKo TakaHashi, Dafna Talmor, Vibeke Tandberg, Neil Taylor, Jennet Thomas, Thomson & Craigshead, John Timberlake, Emma Tod, Townley and Bradby, Suzanne Treister, Lorenzo Triburgo, Alexandra Urban, Pedro Valdez Cardoso, Markus Von Platen, Shen Xin, Tom White, Elizabeth Wright, Mark Peter Wright, Judith Zaugg, Eli Zafran, O Zhang

More info online

Martin John Callanan will reflect aspects of central banking, economics, finance and data through conceptual art

08 July 2015

​Available as: PDF

With 11 days to go for the public to nominate a visual artist to feature on the next £20 bank note, the Bank is pleased to deepen its collaboration with visual arts through the arrival of artist Martin John Callanan, who will be working at the Bank over the next twelve months on a series of conceptual art projects. Mr Callanan’s work – which will be generously funded by the Leverhulme Trust and University College London – will reflect aspects of central banking, economics, finance and data.

Mr. Callanan – a Teaching Fellow at UCL’s Slade School of Fine Art and current holder of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Visual and Performing Art – researches and creates artwork to better understand how societies and individuals interact with technological, political, economic, environmental and other systems. His work, exhibited and published internationally, expresses complex ideas relating to these systems in tangible, accessible ways.

Working with the Bank of England will provide Mr. Callanan a unique opportunity to expand his research into financial services and economics, and to collaborate with economists, mathematicians and computer scientists at the Bank and beyond.

Through the exhibition of these finished artworks, this collaboration will also provide the Bank with a unique opportunity – to raise awareness and broaden public understanding of our mission to promote the good of the people of the United Kingdom by maintaining monetary and financial stability.

The Bank renewed its mission as part of the launch of its Strategic Plan in March 2014. Core priorities as part of this Plan included: opening up the Bank’s research and analytical work to external contributions – and its data sets to the public – in order to benefit from external points of view; partnering with outside academic researchers to develop advanced data and research capabilities; encouraging diversity in all forms, including promoting and encouraging diversity of thinking and experience; and building public understanding of the Bank’s responsibilities for maintaining monetary and financial stability.

The Bank’s collaboration with Mr. Callanan will help to further each of these priorities, and builds on other successful Strategic Plan initiatives to date – including the launch of a One Bank Research Agenda, a data visualisation competition and our new Bank Underground staff blog.

It is also timely, given the next £20 banknote will celebrate Britain’s achievements in the visual arts. Since 19 May 2015, the public have been invited to nominate historic visual artists they would like to see on the £20 note, to be released by 2020. Thousands of nominations have been received so far – underlining the extent of British achievement in the visual arts and reinforcing why this field deserves to be recognised on the next £20 note. The public has until 19 July 2015 to make their nominations on the Bank’s website.

Welcoming Mr. Callanan’s presence at the Bank, Governor Mark Carney said:

“Today’s announcement brings together three recent themes of the Bank’s work. The financial crisis has taught us that we must look beyond the conventional, and approach policy issues with creativity, audacity, and diverse thinking. Harnessing the power of Big Data will allow for new patterns, new trends, and ultimately, new answers to age-old questions. And as we move towards celebrating the visual arts on our new £20 bank note, we also reflect on how the visual arts can help us deliver on our mission to promote the good of the people of the United Kingdom. On behalf of the Bank, I warmly welcome Martin Callanan, I look forward to seeing the results of his work, and I thank the Leverhulme Trust and University College London for generously sponsoring his work.”

Read on Bank of England website
PDF

I Cannot Not Communicate at Vitsœ New York

I Cannot Not Communicate, Martin John Callanan at Vitsœ New York: 14–19 May
33 Bond Street
New York NY 10012
T 1 917 675 6990
newyork@vitsoe.com

At Vitsœ we like to share the work of creative people. So when Berlin and UK-based artist (and Vitsœ customer), Martin John Callanan, asked to show a new piece for the first time at our New York shop, we were happy to oblige.

I Cannot Not Communicate, consists of the top 100 books recommended to Callanan by Amazon, based on everything he read and bought since the online retail giant first launched its recommendation algorithm over 15 years ago.

The books are displayed on our trusted shelves, with chairs and tables to ensure your time interacting with the artwork is a comfortable one.

The event will take place during a busy time with New York design week and Frieze Art Fair New York occupying the city – all the more reason to take a moment to pause in comfort at our New York shop at 33 Bond Street.

To accompany the installation, Callanan has produced a pamphlet, including a text by Marialaura Ghidini. A limited number of copies are available free to visitors.

Martin John Callanan is an artist researching an individual’s place within systems. Recent solo exhibitions include Noshowspace, London, Horrach Moya, Palma and Or Gallery, Berlin. His work has been shown at White Cube, James Cohan Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Whitstable Biennale and Imperial War Museum. He is recipient of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Visual Art.

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Die Zusammenarbeit mit kreativen Köpfen macht uns immer wieder Freude. Als uns der in Berlin und Großbritannien lebende Künstler (und Vitsœ Kunde) Martin John Callanan fragte, ob er seine neue Arbeit in unserem New Yorker Shop ausstellen könne, sagten wir ohne Zögern zu.

„I Cannot Not Communicate“ besteht aus den ersten 100 Büchern, die Callanan von Amazon vorgeschlagen wurden – basierend auf allem, was er gekauft und gelesen hatte, seit der Onlineshop-Gigant vor mehr als 15 Jahren seinen Algorithmus für Kaufempfehlungen einführte.

Ausgestellt werden die Bücher in unseren bewährten Regalen. Unsere Sessel und Tische sorgen dafür, dass es beim Kunstgenuss nicht an Komfort mangelt.

Die Ausstellung findet während der trubeligen Zeit der New York Design Week und der Kunstmesse Frieze statt – gönnen Sie sich eine kleine Auszeit von der Geschäftigkeit in unserem New Yorker Shop in der Bond Street 33.

Begleitend zur Ausstellung hat Callanan im Riso-Druckverfahren ein Pamphlet produziert, unter anderem mit einem Text von Marialaura Ghidini. Eine limitierte Auflage können geneigte Besucher kostenlos mitnehmen.

Martin John Callanan sucht nach individuellen Wegen im Kunstbetrieb. Seine jüngsten Solo-Ausstellungen fanden im Noshowspace, London, Horrach Moya, Palma und der Or Gallery, Berlin statt. Seine Werke wurden gezeigt von Institutionen wie White Cube, James Cohan Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Whitstable Biennale und dem Imperial War Museum. Er ist ausgezeichnet worden mit dem Philip Leverhulme Prize für Bildende Kunst.

Video DOC at Media Art Futures, Departure of All and Text Trends

Video DOC cinema programme at Media Art Futures, Murcia, 15-30 April 2015 features both Text Trends and documentary video of Departure of All.

In his book “The Imaginary Museum” (1965), André Malraux asserted that in the reproductions of artworks published in books and exhibition catalogues we can find more significant artworks that could be seen in the largest museum of the world. Internet has exponentially expanded Malraux’s Imaginary Museum and provided us with unprecedented access to a myriad of artworks. In digital art, the complexity or ephemerality of many artworks makes it difficult to see them in an exhibition and therefore it is the video documentation created by the artists themselves that allows us to discover their works. Two selections of documentation videos present an overview of the many faces of digital art today.

Abelardo Gil-Fournier
Alessandro Ludovico
Aram Bartholl
Aymeric Mansoux
Carlo Zanni
Chris Sugrue
Christa Sommerer
Clara Boj y Diego Díaz
Dave Griffiths
Evan Roth
F.A.T. Lab
Gordan Savicic
James Powderly
Laurent Mignonneau
Mar Canet
Marco Cadioli
Marloes de Valk
Martin John Callanan
Martina Höfflin
moddr_
Moisés Mañas
Paolo Cirio
Pascal Glissmann
Radamés Ajna
Sander Veenhof
Tempt1
Theo Watson
Thiago Hersan
Thierry Fournier
Tilman Reiff
Varvara Guljajeva
Volker Morawe
VR Urban
Zach Lieberman

Curated by Pau Waelder

See the whole film programme or the whole Festival programme or PDF

E-Flux Conversations: Paranoid Subjectivity and the Challenges of Cognitive Mapping – How is Capitalism to be Represented?

The most shocking thing about the Edward Snowden revelations is not so much their content as the fact that they have been met with little interest or surprise; not because people are unconcerned about the erosion of civil liberties, but because they thought that they knew all of this already. The internet now seems to produce a mode of hyper-connectivity, short-circuiting any separation between public and private. Along with the internationalisation of finance and other aspects of globalisation, this can make it feel as if everything has become completely interconnected, and there is nowhere left to hide from the encroachment of capital.

We submit that this state of hyperconnectivity induces a kind of paranoid subjectivity. Marx showed that there is something inherent to capitalism which makes it very difficult to see past its surface effects to its essential structure. While this was already true in his time, today the vast scale of the networks governing contemporary existence makes this aspect of capitalist society a near-constant feature of everyday experience. As abstraction reaches into every crevice of our existence, art increasingly adopts a style that Emily Apter has called oneworldedness: “a delirious aesthetics of systematicity … held in place by the paranoid premise that ‘everything is connected’”. on Paranoia.pdf2 (912.0 KB)

‘Onewordledness’ is poignantly and hilariously expressed in Hito Steyerl’s video Liquidity Inc. (2014), which deliberately confuses various meanings of the word liquidity (physics, finance, climate, martial arts), showing intricate, but unfathomable links between seemingly unrelated spheres. Steyerl’s work is the latest in a long line of artistic and theoretical reflections on (and of) paranoid subjectivity since the 1960s. From the novels of Thomas Pynchon, paranoia movies such as The Conversation and the films of Adam Curtis, to the rise of systems theory, and notions of the ‘network’ (Luhman), much art and theory from the US and Europe in this period has reflected an increasing interest in modes of cognition either contend with or break down due to the increasing scale of social abstraction. The popular television show The Wire (2002-2008) is a key example, being centered on a dense web of connections which traverse the US city of Baltimore, uniting all of its diverse spheres into a violent and tragic situation that the character Omar simply calls ‘the game’.

In this conversation, the third and last in a series that we, David Hodge and Hamed Yousefi, are organizing for e-flux conversations, we would like to critically consider the political consequences of ‘oneworldedness’. Fredric Jameson once said that “Conspiracy […] is the poor person’s cognitive mapping in the postmodern age … the degraded figure of the total logic of late capital, a desperate attempt to represent the latter’s system”.JamesonF86a_CognitiveMapping.pdf1 (155.3 KB) But what if capital’s abstractions interpolate subjects who are unable to undertake a critical cognitive mapping? Can art help to induce new forms of subjectivity, which might be better equipped to trace the totality?

Yet again, we have another fantastic group of contributors, who will take it in turns to write a post every weekday:

Martin John Callanan ( http://greyisgood.eu) is an artist whose practice involves “researching the individual’s place within systems”. His work has been exhibited and published internationally and he lectures at Slade School of Fine Arts, UCL, London.

Alberto Toscano is Reader in Critical Theory at the Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London. His most recent book is Cartographies of the Absolute (with Jeff Kinkle) – see: https://cartographiesoftheabsolute.wordpress.com.

Sarah Brouillette is Associate Professor of English Language and Literature at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She is currently researching “a sort of cultural history of neoliberalism”, focusing on UNESCO as a core case study.

Tom Eyers is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, U.S.A. He is the author of three books including Speculative Formalism: Literature, Theory, and the Critical Present (Forthcoming, 2015).

Join the conversation

How to Construct a Time Machine – This is Tomorrow

How to Construct a Time Machine

How to Construct a Time Machine
MK Gallery Milton Keynes
23 January-22 March 2015
Review by Edwina Attlee

In his essay on the history of photography Walter Benjamin charges patent-law problems and a coincidence of industrious inventors as the cause for the accelerated development and misty history of the medium. Conditions were created ‘that for a long time ruled out any kind of looking back.’ (1) The irony is that photography created the conditions for a backwards-look, an arrest and exposure of the momentary that made looking back, both pastime and pleasure. What was it now possible to look back at? Nothing more than the optical unconscious. This was Benjamin’s term for the hitherto unseen, the blown up, the magnified, the halted and the reversed. After photography people could see, for the first time, ‘their posture in the split second of their stepping out’. It is its revelation of the split second that makes the camera a time machine. Obsession with the split second is not a new phenomenon as the 26 works on show here, spanning 1896 – 2014, make clear. Film, video and still-image animation make up the largest proportion of an exhibition that includes drawings, sculpture, musical scores and recordings. From the grainy magic of Georges Méliès and Louis Lumière to Teching Hsieh’s 8,627 single film frames depicting a year of clock-punching, the screen-based medium seems to be the one that is turned to and returned to for attention to the timely.

The show’s curator, Maquard Smith, set himself this question, ‘what is particular – historically, conceptually, aesthetically – to the recent temporal turn in contemporary art?’ He writes that each work ‘makes it possible to play around with, to transform and reinvent the ordering of the past, the present and the future’. What the works do side-by-side is in fact to reveal the opposite, they might desire to subvert and escape time but not a single one does. The medium of photography and film is satisfying because it can be manipulated; it permits the fantasy of slowing down, speeding up and holding still.

The art historian Carol Mavor has described her essay on nostology (the study of aging) as ‘an embarrassment of helplessness’. This exhibition reveals the construction of time machines to be a similar endeavor. The machines betray a discomforting obsession. Their makers are desperate, compulsive, and I suspect, always to be frustrated. On Kawara’s date paintings are only a more legible version of the lines scored into prison walls, made by a captive so as not to forget. But not to forget what? Are dates so important? Are times? As Martin John Callanan’s ‘real time’ departure board, for all the planes in the world, scrolls through an improbable spew of lift offs from Ho Chi Minh City, from Bradford, from Tibilisi, the effect is nonsensical. These events (flight, waking, falling asleep) are both countable and uncountable, or, counting them does not add up to an amount that contains or stands for what is ‘real’. An attention to time does not hold it still, nor does it empty it of its contents.

Which is not to say that this is a pessimistic exhibition. Although redolent of Samuel Beckett’s gallows humour, a lot of the works are extremely funny. After all, a good joke is all in the timing. Thomson & Craighead’s ‘The Time Machine in Alphabetical Order’ calls out ‘machine, machine, machine, man, man, man, Morlocks!’ A number of the pieces give glimpses of a technological unconsciousness, the unbidden pictures and patterns that emerge from automatic systems of ordering. Manfred Mohr’s programmed expressionism uses algorithms to make art. The humour of these pieces works side-by-side with the discomforting sensation of the inanimate made animate.

It is always funny (and tragic) to think about what is happening at the same time as something else. Upstairs from the exhibition, in an empty Video Room, I watch John Cage and Merce Cunningham dance and make sounds on the same stage. Purposely near to one another but conscientiously dislocated they try to make their work without influence from the other. Cage describes it as ‘two things going on at the same time, which is characteristic of life’. It is the ‘at the same time’ which is the most contemporary of concerns for the time machines whirring in the gallery below. Current technologies make simultaneity visible, splitting seconds and distributing their image. The desperate work of the self-consciously timed machines continues – and the clocks still work.

(1) Walter Benjamin, ‘Brief History of Photography’, One-way Street and Other Writings (London: Penguin, 2009) p.172

This is Tomorrow

Mapping Spaces book edited by Ulrike Gehring

Mapping Spaces

This large survey book builds on the ZKM Karlsruhe exhibition tracing the multifaceted relationship between art, science and technology in Dutch landscape art around 1650. Long before digital satellite imagery, Dutch artists used modern systems of remote sensing. Their art works provide valuable insights into past exchanges of knowledge that anticipate the techniques of mapping used today.

Includes A Planetary Order.

Hardcover: 500 pages
Publisher: Hirmer (1 Dec. 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-13: 978-3777422305
Dimensions: 25.5 x 3.8 x 29.4 cm

Piet Zwart Institute Symposium: The Laughter of Things

Monday January 26, 2015. 10am till 6pm
Piet Zwart Institute, Karel Doormanhof 45 3012 GC Rotterdam
Admission free

This day of lectures and presentations will focus on old and recent media technologies of temporal measurement and control, and how they animate and re-animate human life.

The keynote speaker is Zoe Beloff, who will discuss works she is presenting in the International Film Festival Rotterdam 2015 program, including: The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff (2012) and Glass House (2014)

Further speakers that will expand on this topic of pervasive techniques of control, that mobilise audiovisual media to measure, categorise, and discipline us, include: Zoe Beloff, Aura Satz, Julien Maire, Martin John Callanan, Florian Cramer

The PIET ZWART INSTITUTE, MASTER MEDIA DESIGN (LENS-BASED MEDIA / NETWORKED MEDIA) is an intensive project-based research degree that will equip you to create a distinctive voice as an artist/designer in the contemporary media landscape. Our programme encourages students to explore the new possibilities released by the friction between media forms, critically working across the historical gaps between photography, cinema, animation, mobile media, information systems and technological networks. The curriculum combines collective learning, intensive individual tutorial support, practice-based research and theoretical inquiry.

http://www.pzwart.nl/blog/2015/01/12/symposium-the-laughter-of-things/

Made possible with support from the British Council Travel Grant Fund

44th International Film Festival Rotterdam

The 44th International Film Festival Rotterdam will take place 21 January – 1 February 2015, and include Departure of All and Text Trends in the Signals: 24/7 programme.

24/7 will focus on the changing world & technology, and how the attention economy is affecting our lives, how we consume information and how it dominates not only our waking but also our sleeping moments. Our experience of time is mutating at the speed of light, due to the glass fibre and wireless networks that keep us entangled. How this affects our sense of reality now and its impact in the near future is one of the most important discussions in the world today.

In the late 1990s, when Google was barely one year old and was still a privately held company, its future CEO, Dr. Eric Schmidt was already articulating the context in which such a venture would flourish. Schmidt declared that the twenty-first century would be synonymous with what he called the ‘attention economy’, and that the dominant global corporations would be those that succeed in maximizing the number of ‘eyeballs’ they could consistently engage and control.

24/7 is focussed on stimulating discussion on this ‘attention economy’, the global thirst for information and the daily data consumption and mass synchronisation of work and leisure rhythms which are synonymous with this. We are working, communicating and consuming whenever and wherever we happen to be in the world. Divisions between night and day, between rest and work are gradually disappearing. Our experience of time is mutating at the speed of light, due to the glass fibre and wireless networks that keep us entangled.

Therefore 24/7 forces the audience to step out of the cinema, into hotels. A hotel is just like a cinema, a place where one checks in to step out of the daily routine. They are open 24/7 and strongly associated with our need for sleep. While examining the ever-changing world of the 21st Century, this programme challenges the traditional notion of a film ‘slot’ by raising the question of what we now class as a ‘normal duration’.

Films in Signals 24/7
Departure of All at IFFR
Text Trends at IFFR
Signals: 24/7 programme PDF

Made possible with support from the British Council Travel Grant Fund

The Routledge Companion to Remix Studies

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The Routledge Companion to Remix Studies
Chapter 31, Of Re/appropriations, Gustavo Romano

Hardcover: 556 pages
Publisher: Routledge (26 Jan 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-13: 978-0415716253
Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 17.5 x 3.6 cm

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