Video DOC at Media Art Futures, Departure of All and Text Trends

Video DOC cinema programme at Media Art Futures, Murcia, 15-30 April 2015 features both Text Trends and documentary video of Departure of All.

In his book “The Imaginary Museum” (1965), André Malraux asserted that in the reproductions of artworks published in books and exhibition catalogues we can find more significant artworks that could be seen in the largest museum of the world. Internet has exponentially expanded Malraux’s Imaginary Museum and provided us with unprecedented access to a myriad of artworks. In digital art, the complexity or ephemerality of many artworks makes it difficult to see them in an exhibition and therefore it is the video documentation created by the artists themselves that allows us to discover their works. Two selections of documentation videos present an overview of the many faces of digital art today.

Abelardo Gil-Fournier
Alessandro Ludovico
Aram Bartholl
Aymeric Mansoux
Carlo Zanni
Chris Sugrue
Christa Sommerer
Clara Boj y Diego Díaz
Dave Griffiths
Evan Roth
F.A.T. Lab
Gordan Savicic
James Powderly
Laurent Mignonneau
Mar Canet
Marco Cadioli
Marloes de Valk
Martin John Callanan
Martina Höfflin
moddr_
Moisés Mañas
Paolo Cirio
Pascal Glissmann
Radamés Ajna
Sander Veenhof
Tempt1
Theo Watson
Thiago Hersan
Thierry Fournier
Tilman Reiff
Varvara Guljajeva
Volker Morawe
VR Urban
Zach Lieberman

Curated by Pau Waelder

See the whole film programme or the whole Festival programme or PDF

E-Flux Conversations: Paranoid Subjectivity and the Challenges of Cognitive Mapping – How is Capitalism to be Represented?

The most shocking thing about the Edward Snowden revelations is not so much their content as the fact that they have been met with little interest or surprise; not because people are unconcerned about the erosion of civil liberties, but because they thought that they knew all of this already. The internet now seems to produce a mode of hyper-connectivity, short-circuiting any separation between public and private. Along with the internationalisation of finance and other aspects of globalisation, this can make it feel as if everything has become completely interconnected, and there is nowhere left to hide from the encroachment of capital.

We submit that this state of hyperconnectivity induces a kind of paranoid subjectivity. Marx showed that there is something inherent to capitalism which makes it very difficult to see past its surface effects to its essential structure. While this was already true in his time, today the vast scale of the networks governing contemporary existence makes this aspect of capitalist society a near-constant feature of everyday experience. As abstraction reaches into every crevice of our existence, art increasingly adopts a style that Emily Apter has called oneworldedness: “a delirious aesthetics of systematicity … held in place by the paranoid premise that ‘everything is connected’”. on Paranoia.pdf2 (912.0 KB)

‘Onewordledness’ is poignantly and hilariously expressed in Hito Steyerl’s video Liquidity Inc. (2014), which deliberately confuses various meanings of the word liquidity (physics, finance, climate, martial arts), showing intricate, but unfathomable links between seemingly unrelated spheres. Steyerl’s work is the latest in a long line of artistic and theoretical reflections on (and of) paranoid subjectivity since the 1960s. From the novels of Thomas Pynchon, paranoia movies such as The Conversation and the films of Adam Curtis, to the rise of systems theory, and notions of the ‘network’ (Luhman), much art and theory from the US and Europe in this period has reflected an increasing interest in modes of cognition either contend with or break down due to the increasing scale of social abstraction. The popular television show The Wire (2002-2008) is a key example, being centered on a dense web of connections which traverse the US city of Baltimore, uniting all of its diverse spheres into a violent and tragic situation that the character Omar simply calls ‘the game’.

In this conversation, the third and last in a series that we, David Hodge and Hamed Yousefi, are organizing for e-flux conversations, we would like to critically consider the political consequences of ‘oneworldedness’. Fredric Jameson once said that “Conspiracy […] is the poor person’s cognitive mapping in the postmodern age … the degraded figure of the total logic of late capital, a desperate attempt to represent the latter’s system”.JamesonF86a_CognitiveMapping.pdf1 (155.3 KB) But what if capital’s abstractions interpolate subjects who are unable to undertake a critical cognitive mapping? Can art help to induce new forms of subjectivity, which might be better equipped to trace the totality?

Yet again, we have another fantastic group of contributors, who will take it in turns to write a post every weekday:

Martin John Callanan ( http://greyisgood.eu) is an artist whose practice involves “researching the individual’s place within systems”. His work has been exhibited and published internationally and he lectures at Slade School of Fine Arts, UCL, London.

Alberto Toscano is Reader in Critical Theory at the Department of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London. His most recent book is Cartographies of the Absolute (with Jeff Kinkle) – see: https://cartographiesoftheabsolute.wordpress.com.

Sarah Brouillette is Associate Professor of English Language and Literature at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada. She is currently researching “a sort of cultural history of neoliberalism”, focusing on UNESCO as a core case study.

Tom Eyers is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh, U.S.A. He is the author of three books including Speculative Formalism: Literature, Theory, and the Critical Present (Forthcoming, 2015).

Join the conversation

How to Construct a Time Machine – This is Tomorrow

How to Construct a Time Machine

How to Construct a Time Machine
MK Gallery Milton Keynes
23 January-22 March 2015
Review by Edwina Attlee

In his essay on the history of photography Walter Benjamin charges patent-law problems and a coincidence of industrious inventors as the cause for the accelerated development and misty history of the medium. Conditions were created ‘that for a long time ruled out any kind of looking back.’ (1) The irony is that photography created the conditions for a backwards-look, an arrest and exposure of the momentary that made looking back, both pastime and pleasure. What was it now possible to look back at? Nothing more than the optical unconscious. This was Benjamin’s term for the hitherto unseen, the blown up, the magnified, the halted and the reversed. After photography people could see, for the first time, ‘their posture in the split second of their stepping out’. It is its revelation of the split second that makes the camera a time machine. Obsession with the split second is not a new phenomenon as the 26 works on show here, spanning 1896 – 2014, make clear. Film, video and still-image animation make up the largest proportion of an exhibition that includes drawings, sculpture, musical scores and recordings. From the grainy magic of Georges Méliès and Louis Lumière to Teching Hsieh’s 8,627 single film frames depicting a year of clock-punching, the screen-based medium seems to be the one that is turned to and returned to for attention to the timely.

The show’s curator, Maquard Smith, set himself this question, ‘what is particular – historically, conceptually, aesthetically – to the recent temporal turn in contemporary art?’ He writes that each work ‘makes it possible to play around with, to transform and reinvent the ordering of the past, the present and the future’. What the works do side-by-side is in fact to reveal the opposite, they might desire to subvert and escape time but not a single one does. The medium of photography and film is satisfying because it can be manipulated; it permits the fantasy of slowing down, speeding up and holding still.

The art historian Carol Mavor has described her essay on nostology (the study of aging) as ‘an embarrassment of helplessness’. This exhibition reveals the construction of time machines to be a similar endeavor. The machines betray a discomforting obsession. Their makers are desperate, compulsive, and I suspect, always to be frustrated. On Kawara’s date paintings are only a more legible version of the lines scored into prison walls, made by a captive so as not to forget. But not to forget what? Are dates so important? Are times? As Martin John Callanan’s ‘real time’ departure board, for all the planes in the world, scrolls through an improbable spew of lift offs from Ho Chi Minh City, from Bradford, from Tibilisi, the effect is nonsensical. These events (flight, waking, falling asleep) are both countable and uncountable, or, counting them does not add up to an amount that contains or stands for what is ‘real’. An attention to time does not hold it still, nor does it empty it of its contents.

Which is not to say that this is a pessimistic exhibition. Although redolent of Samuel Beckett’s gallows humour, a lot of the works are extremely funny. After all, a good joke is all in the timing. Thomson & Craighead’s ‘The Time Machine in Alphabetical Order’ calls out ‘machine, machine, machine, man, man, man, Morlocks!’ A number of the pieces give glimpses of a technological unconsciousness, the unbidden pictures and patterns that emerge from automatic systems of ordering. Manfred Mohr’s programmed expressionism uses algorithms to make art. The humour of these pieces works side-by-side with the discomforting sensation of the inanimate made animate.

It is always funny (and tragic) to think about what is happening at the same time as something else. Upstairs from the exhibition, in an empty Video Room, I watch John Cage and Merce Cunningham dance and make sounds on the same stage. Purposely near to one another but conscientiously dislocated they try to make their work without influence from the other. Cage describes it as ‘two things going on at the same time, which is characteristic of life’. It is the ‘at the same time’ which is the most contemporary of concerns for the time machines whirring in the gallery below. Current technologies make simultaneity visible, splitting seconds and distributing their image. The desperate work of the self-consciously timed machines continues – and the clocks still work.

(1) Walter Benjamin, ‘Brief History of Photography’, One-way Street and Other Writings (London: Penguin, 2009) p.172

This is Tomorrow

Mapping Spaces book edited by Ulrike Gehring

Mapping Spaces

This large survey book builds on the ZKM Karlsruhe exhibition tracing the multifaceted relationship between art, science and technology in Dutch landscape art around 1650. Long before digital satellite imagery, Dutch artists used modern systems of remote sensing. Their art works provide valuable insights into past exchanges of knowledge that anticipate the techniques of mapping used today.

Includes A Planetary Order.

Hardcover: 500 pages
Publisher: Hirmer (1 Dec. 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-13: 978-3777422305
Dimensions: 25.5 x 3.8 x 29.4 cm

Piet Zwart Institute Symposium: The Laughter of Things

Monday January 26, 2015. 10am till 6pm
Piet Zwart Institute, Karel Doormanhof 45 3012 GC Rotterdam
Admission free

This day of lectures and presentations will focus on old and recent media technologies of temporal measurement and control, and how they animate and re-animate human life.

The keynote speaker is Zoe Beloff, who will discuss works she is presenting in the International Film Festival Rotterdam 2015 program, including: The Infernal Dream of Mutt and Jeff (2012) and Glass House (2014)

Further speakers that will expand on this topic of pervasive techniques of control, that mobilise audiovisual media to measure, categorise, and discipline us, include: Zoe Beloff, Aura Satz, Julien Maire, Martin John Callanan, Florian Cramer

The PIET ZWART INSTITUTE, MASTER MEDIA DESIGN (LENS-BASED MEDIA / NETWORKED MEDIA) is an intensive project-based research degree that will equip you to create a distinctive voice as an artist/designer in the contemporary media landscape. Our programme encourages students to explore the new possibilities released by the friction between media forms, critically working across the historical gaps between photography, cinema, animation, mobile media, information systems and technological networks. The curriculum combines collective learning, intensive individual tutorial support, practice-based research and theoretical inquiry.

http://www.pzwart.nl/blog/2015/01/12/symposium-the-laughter-of-things/

Made possible with support from the British Council Travel Grant Fund

How to Construct a Time Machine, MK Gallery, Milton Keynes – Departure of All

		How to Construct a Time Machine, MK Gallery, Milton Keynes

23 January – 22 March 2015

Preview 22 January 2015 / 6-10pm

MK Gallery, 900 Midsummer Boulevard, Central Milton Keynes, MK9 3QA.
Admission is free

www.mkgallery.org

January 2015 MK Gallery presents How to Construct a Time Machine (23 January – 22 March 2015), an exhibition of over twenty-five historical and contemporary works that explore how artists play with media in innovative ways to transform our experience of time.

What is time? How do we order the past, the present, and the future? Why are artists interested in time? How is art a machine, vehicle, or device for exploring time? How is art a means by which time ‘travels’, and how does art permit us to travel in time? Consideration of these and other questions has provided the exhibition rationale for guest curator, Dr Marquard Smith, Head of Doctoral Studies/Research Leader in the School of Humanities at the Royal College of Art, London.

The show’s title is taken from an 1899 text by the avant-garde French writer, Alfred Jarry, written in direct response to H. G. Wells’ science fiction novel The Time Machine (1895). Wells invented and popularised a distinctively modern, fictional concept of time travel, with the time machine as a vehicle that could be operated ‘selectively’.Jarry’s response crafted a pseudo-scientific fiction that presents the time machine and time travel as an instance of ‘the science of imaginary solutions’.

Taking this idea of the time machine, time travel, and perhaps even time itself as an instance of ‘the science of imaginary solutions’, the exhibition is divided thematically across the galleries and includes works by John Cage, Martin John Callanan, Jim Campbell, Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher, Matt Collishaw, Ruth Ewan, Tehching Hsieh, the Lumière Brothers, Chris Marker, Kris Martin, Manfred Mohr, Melvin Moti, Nam June Paik, Katie Paterson, Elizabeth Price, The Otolith Group, Raqs Media Collective, Meekyoung Shin, Sun Ra, Thompson & Craighead, Mark Wallinger and Catherine Yass, amongst others.

Film work ranges from George Méliès’ A Trip to the Moon (1902), an iconic silent movie which follows a group of astronomers as they explore the moon, to Thomson & Craighead’s The Time Machine in alphabetical order (2010), a complete rendition of the 1960s film version of the Wells’ novella re-edited into alphabetical order.

Sculptural work includes Mark Wallinger’s Time and Relative Dimensions in Space (2001), an aluminium version of Dr Who’s ‘Tardis’ police box that simultaneously disappears into the space-time continuum and reflects its own surroundings, and Ruth Ewan’s We Could Have Been Anything That We Wanted to Be (2012), a decimal clock which divides the day into ten (rather than twenty-four) periods, echoing a bold 18th century French Republican attempt to redefine and rationalise the day.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue, designed by Herman Lelie, featuring an extended Introduction by the exhibition’s curator and a translation of Jarry’s How to Construct a Time Machine, together with essays by Dutch cultural theorist and video artist Mieke Bal and radical philosopher Peter Osborne. The exhibition will be supported by a range of related events including tours by the curator and artists, seminars, academic conferences, and film screenings.

MK Gallery exhibition page
List of works (PDF)
Installation images
Download PDF News Release
Download PDF invite

www.mkgallery.org

The Fifth Season, James Cohan Gallery

the fifth season, james cohan gallery

the fifth season, james cohan gallery

24 June – 8 August 2014
Opening Reception: Thursday, June 26, 6 – 8 PM

James Cohan Gallery is pleased to present The Fifth Season, opening on 24 June until 8 August 2014. An opening reception will be held on Thursday 26 June, 6 – 8 pm. This group exhibition explores the seasonal rhythms of natural systems, the human disruptions of these once-balanced cycles, and the increasing alarms of global climate change.

The theme of the “four seasons” has inspired countless works of art throughout history. As a subject, the seasons are metaphors for life cycles and transitions. The calendar propels our existence on a regular emotional and physiological schedule. The rhythm of life is inextricably connected to the quartered year.

Ecological and technological changes have created a less defined cycle of life, one that is sped up by the velocity of communication and slowed down by unpredictable environmental behavior, calling into question our long-held notions of how time behaves. One is confronted on a daily basis by unprecedented connectivity and growing awareness of irregular natural patterns, and we as a species are struggling to understand this new reality.

Whether addressing the conventional notion of the four seasons or reflecting on today’s intense technological hybridity and climate change, the exhibition presents an opportunity to situate ourselves in this fifth season—a highly nuanced, unfamiliar place.

Participating artists: Matthew Brandt, David Brooks, Charles Burchfield, Martin John Callanan, Claude Louis Châtelet, Jacques de Lajoüe, Mark Dion, Spencer Finch, Finger Pointing Worker, Futurefarmers, Carsten Höller, Pierre Huyghe, Natalie Jeremijenko, Beatriz Milhazes + BUF, Katie Paterson, Alexis Rockman, Erin Shirreff, Kota Takeuchi, Alison Elizabeth Taylor, Fred Tomaselli, and Erik Wysocan.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a free publication and guide containing complementary images and texts.

Press release [PDF]

Exhibition publication [PDF]

Reivindicando intenciones

Georgina Sas Les belles infidèles Galería Horrach Moyà Plaça Drassanes, 15. Palma. Hasta el 1 de junio.

Durante la edad de oro de la literatura francesa traducían à sa manière los textos clásicos, que en muchas ocasiones dejaban irreconocibles los textos originales, de ahí la expresión “la fidelidad sin resolver de toda traducción literaria”. El proceso de traducción pasa por ser una operación de equivalencias, igual que la que puede ofrecer el arte. Cada espectador establece contactos diferentes con la obra que tiene ante él; su grado de cultura, su situación en la sociedad e incluso el pensamiento político, pueden variar la lectura de esa realidad sensible. El autor ha reproducido según su propia visión del mundo, pero el espectador se refleja en su propia realidad. Si para Aristóteles el concepto estético de la Mímesis era la imitación de la naturaleza como fin esencial del arte, para los creadores del siglo XXI les conviene erigir en conciencia y en coherencia. Creaciones que, por su heterogeneidad y diversidad han asumido la vocación de perturbar conscientemente nuestra percepción de lo real; luego la fragilidad y variabilidad de los juicios formulados sobre las obras pueden ser todos distintos y, sin embargo, todos poseer la misma legitimidad. De todo esto trata esta colectiva: once artistas con piezas que van de la escultura, a la pintura, a la fotografía o al vídeo; repartidas por las distintas salas, con un diálogo entrecruzado.

Me siento fascinada ante las obras de Girbent, con sus escenas crípticas, en las que entremezcla el sentimiento y la experiencia. También por Montserrat Soto, con una pieza fotográfica que provoca una percepción en un marco realmente desconcertante. Martin John Callanan, con una propuesta conceptual que investiga al individuo dentro de su propio sistema. Carles Congost con un vídeo de lenguaje depurado y sutil, con una indagación visual, una condición extraña y evanescente que permite ver lo invisible. Vasco Araújo con una alegoría de la infructuosa búsqueda de la humanidad para la comprensión, fruto de su contacto con Samuel Beckett; Susy Gómez, siempre audaz con sus vestidos convertidos en corazas y el simbolismo de cotidianidad; Alejandro Vidal con su fotografía refinada pero a la vez violenta; Joana Vasconcelos con una pieza cerámica enfundada de crochet o Aníbal López con una composición pictórica hecha a partir de su propia sangre.

Una selección reflexiva y gratificante que permite relacionar y seguir un recorrido singular y coherente. El artista no tiene más intención que recoger la realidad, no revelar la verdad, porque nunca lo verdadero se ha convertido en falso.

Diario de Mallorca, Sociedad y Cultura

Les Belles Infidèles, Galeria Horrach Moya, 5 April – 1 June, 2014

Horrach Moya

Horrach Moya

Galeria Horrach Moya, 5 April – 1 June, 2014

Girbent
The poetess or if one prefers… The aroma and the rumor II. 2013
Oil on canvas
235 x 160 cm

Joana Vasconcelos
Concha, 2013
Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro faience painted with ceramic
glaze, handmade cotton crochet
31 x 115 x 90 cm

Susy Gómez
Untitled. 265, 2006
Mixed media on printed image and
photographically enlarged on wood
240 x 180 cm

Montserrat Soto
Invasion-Sucesion 23. 2011
Photograph
220 x 235 cm

Carles Congost
Easy Katz/ Bad Painting Series, 2013
Vídeo HD
6 min 22 sec

Vasco Araújo
Who Where, 2011
Instalation : Digital Photographs
140x140cm; 65x65cm; 20x140cm

A-153167 (Aníbal López)
Fluidos corporales. , 2012
Blood on watercolor paper.
56 x 76 cm

Alejandro Vidal
Tension and Release, 2013
Giclée print
160 x 120 cm

Martin John Callanan
I Wanted To See All The News From Today, 2013
Web based program collecting
front covers of newspapers from around the world. Digital Print.
22 x 220 cm

Susy Gómez
Tu Tienes Prioridad, 2010
Result of the action of melting an original
dress in lost wax technique. Aluminium.
Real dimensions. 150 x 60 x 70 cm

Whitstable Biennale 2014 artists announced

The 7th Whitstable Biennale 31 May to 15 June 2014

Rosa Ainley • The ARKA Group • Bronwen Buckeridge • Martin John Callanan • Collaborative Research Group • Louisa Fairclough • S Mark Gubb • Neil Henderson • Susannah Hewlett • Max Leonard Hitchings • Ben Judd • Fiona James • Una Knox • Hannah Lees • Samuel Levack and Jennifer Lewandowski • Rachel Lichtenstein • Force Majeure • Louisa Martin • Jeremy Millar • Katrina Palmer • Colin Priest • Abigail Reed • Kieren Reed • Rachel Reupke • Margaret Salmon • John Walter • Laura Wilson • Richard Wilson and Zatorski + Zatorski

Wars During My Lifetime, live broadcast

Wars During My Lifetime

whitstable biennale

A new work made for screen, Wars During My Lifetime, will be streamed live online Friday 28 March at 6pm Whitstable time.

Wars During My Lifetime collects together wars that have taken place all over the world during one individual’s lifetime. A fascinating list, the film makes no comment, but quietly brings the list to our attention. Many are wars we hear about on the radio on a daily basis, others are long since finished, or so small or distant they haven’t touched our consciousness.

Wars During My Lifetime is the first commission in a new collection of permanent works that can be viewed anywhere in the world but will have no physical presence and will exist exclusively on Whitstable Biennale’s new website.

Wars During My Lifetime will sit permanently on Whitstable’s Biennale’s new website from late April 2014.

Wars During My Lifetime has been commissioned by Whitstable Biennale.
Thanks to Nicola Harrison, Martin Barbour BBC, and BBC Political Programmes.

After a War, LIFT Festival 2014, Battersea Arts Center

After a War

A century of conflict

The first world war can seem hopelessly remote to the 21st-century mind. And yet, this war ushered in modernity and set the pace for the most murderous century of human history. It ripped through Europe, dissolved empires, changed the nature of warfare and continues to define global relationships.

For After a War, LIFT, Tim Etchells (Artistic Director, Forced Entertainment) and 14–18 NOW WW1 Centenary Art Commissions, have invited 25 artists and companies from across the world to think about the global impact and legacy of the first world war alongside contemporary issues of war and peace. Our programme culminates in this three-day weekender at Battersea Arts Centre — a potent venue which, from 1916 onwards, housed the trials of many of London’s conscientious objectors.

LIFT website

After A War schedule and info (PDF)

Mapping Spaces: Networks of Knowledge in the Landscape Art of the 17th Century, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

12 April – 13 July, 2014
An exhibition at the ZKM Museum of Contemporary Art
Opening: Fri, April 11, 2014, 7 p.m.

The ZKM throws new light on 17th century landscape painting. Comparable to modern satellite surveying (GPS), true to scale landscape representation is also indebted to the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge: the alliance of geodesists, mathematicians, instrument makers and painters. Artists had designed modern surveying systems long before new media drew on images from outer space.

The exhibition Mapping Spaces examines, for the first time ever on this scale, the influence of early modern guide books in geography, the science of surveying and the construction of fortification on Dutch painting around 1650. The prelude to the project, developed at the University of Trier, is Pieter Snayers‘ large-format depiction of historical battle scenes, in which maps and landscape paintings are projected over one another so as to document the most recent developments in modern engineering, ballistics and the fortification construction.

Over 220 exhibits, among them paintings, surveying instruments, graphics devices, books, maps and globes drawn from the most important collections of works, such as from the Prado (Madrid), the Louvre (Paris), the Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam) or the Kunsthistorischen Museum (Vienna) testify to these new theses in pictorial science. The new mapping of an early modern area of knowledge is accompanied by contemporary works of art that thematize the influence of technological developments on our present-day perception of space.

Das ZKM wirft einen neuen Blick auf die Landschaftsmalerei des 17. Jahrhunderts. Vergleichbar der modernen Satellitenvermessung (GPS) verdankt sich auch die maßstäbliche Landschaftsaufnahme einem verzweigten Netzwerk des Wissens: der Allianz von Geodäten, Mathematikern, Instrumentenbauern und Malern. Lange bevor die Neuen Medien sich also digitaler Bilder aus dem All bedienten, entwarfen Künstler moderne Fernerkundungssysteme.

Die Ausstellung „Mapping Spaces“ untersucht erstmals in diesem Umfang den Einfluss frühneuzeitlicher Handbücher zur Geographie, der Vermessungskunde und dem Festungsbau auf die niederländische Malerei um 1650. Den Auftakt des an der Universität Trier entwickelten Projektes bilden die großformatigen Kriegspanoramen Pieter Snayers, in denen Karten und Landschaftsbilder übereinander projiziert werden, um die neuesten Errungenschaften des modernen Ingenieurwesens, der Ballistik und des Festungsbaus zu dokumentieren.

Mehr als 220 Exponate, darunter Gemälde, Messinstrumente, Zeichengeräte, Bücher, Karten und Globen aus den bedeutendsten Sammlungen der Welt wie dem Prado (Madrid), dem Louvre (Paris), dem Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam) oder dem Kunsthistorischen Museum (Wien) belegen diese neue, bildwissenschaftliche These. Die Neu-Kartierung eines frühneuzeitlichen Wissensraumes wird begleitet von zeitgenössischen Kunstwerken, die den Einfluss technologischer Entwicklungen auf unsere heutige Raumwahrnehmung thematisieren.

500 page book accompanies the exhibition

Look into the Net

Edith Russ Haus for Media Art
NET.ARTography
7 March – 21 April 2014

Opening: 06 March 2014, 19:00
Presstalk: 05 March 2014, 11:00

0100101110101101.org (Eva & Franco Mattes); Ivan Abreu; Amy Alexander; Marcel·lí Antúnez; Kim Asendorf; Lucas Bambozzi; Ryan Barone; Giselle Beiguelman; Amy Berk; Luther Blissett; Natalie Bookchin; Christophe Bruno; Maite Cajaraville; Martin John Callanan; Azahara Cerezo; Paolo Cirio; Arcángel Constantini; Vuk Cosic; Andy Cox; Critical Art Ensemble; Minerva Cuevas; Young-Hae Chang; Santiago Echeverry; Vadim Epstein; Evru; Fiambrera Obrera; Gonzalo Frasca; Belén Gache; Dora García; Daniel García Andújar; Gazira Babeli; Emilio Gomáriz; Ethan Ham; Luis Hernández Galván; Robin Hewlett; Steev Hise; Ricardo Iglesias; Daniel Jacoby; Sergi Jordá; Scott Kildall; Ben Kinsley; La Société Anonyme (José Luis Brea); Joan Leandre; Les Liens Invisibles; Olia Lialina; Rogelio López Cuenca; Iván Lozano; Alessandro Ludovico; Peter Luining; Fernando Llanos; Brian Mackern; Miltos Manetas; Rafael Marchetti; Iván Marino; Antonio Mendoza; Ricardo Miranda Zúñiga; Antoni Muntadas; Mark Napier; Eduardo Navas; Santiago Ortiz; Christian Oyarzún; Paolo Pedercini (Molleindustria); Raquel Rennó; Ricardo Barreto & Paula Perissinotto; Gustavo Romano; Benjamin Rosenbaum; Mario Santamaría; Santo_File (David Casacuberta & Marco Bellinzoni); Mark Shepard; Alexei Shulgin; Mark Skwarek; Darren Solomon; Stanza; Nathaniel Stern; Igor Stromajer; Taller d’Intangibles (Jaume Ferrer & David Gómez); Philipp W. Teister; The Electronic Disturbance Theater; The Yes Men; Thomson & Craighead; Eugenio Tisselli; Ubermorgen; Sander Veenhof; Elo Vega; Angie Waller.

The works shown in this exhibition of the internationally most relevant net artists belong to the collection of NETescopio, iniciated in 2008 and since then constantly developed by the Spanish Museum of Contemporary Art of Extremadura and Latin America – MEIAC, Badajoz. With NETescopio, the MEIAC is a pioneer in the availability of an Internet accessible art collection beyond the physical presence of the actual Museum. A selection of 120, partly no longer accessible, key works covers the panorama of net art production from the 1990s until today. This exhibition is in this sense a unique opportunity to gain an insight into the net art tendencies and their aesthetics. The main objective of the NETescopio archive, which makes also a historical classification of the collected works, is the preservation of the works, characterized by the incorporation of a large numbers of Spanish and Latin American net artists.

The curator Gustavo Romano has distinguished three strategies of artistic appropriation of the Internet with their various formats:

Disassemblings
During the web´s early years the artists started to experiment with the new medium and dealt with the possibilities of interactivity, the use of interfaces and alternative browsers. It is in the first years of web art, which can be seen in this category, that show a greater radicalism with a stress on experimentation and the deconstruction of the medium.

Re/appropriations
The reuse of symbolic materials and artistic reactions to existing content play a key role in this work. In digital media information can be reproduced and manipulated, developing constant mutation. This poses in discourses to copy, original and authorship, as well as to owner and collector of net art. The artist’s role on the web is of a “redirector” of information.

Intrusion
These works refer to artistic intervention in a new public space, the “Internet”, which involve commonly used sites such as Wikipedia or Google Maps, which parody or subvert private pages, in order to undermine them through artistic contexts. Stealthily infiltration of the user’s computer or other computer systems is discussed here. The artist slips here into the role of spies, intruders and solitary flaneurs.

Edith Russ Haus

Wie funktioniert Echtzeit, und wie fühlt sie sich an?

Taz.de

Das Irre an der Zeit ist, dass sie trotz eines wissenschaftlichen Einheitssystems eine überaus subjektive, stets changierende Größe ist. Etwa die, auf die Martin John Callanan aufmerksam macht. Sieben Jahre hat er ein Programm entwickelt und es mit Datenleitungen verknüpft, um in Echtzeit weltweit alle abgehenden Flüge komprimiert zu visualisieren. Aber wer mag wohl im Flieger nach Dubai auf Platz E 12 sitzen? Wie schaut er aus? Wie dem Datenmeer Sinnvolles entnehmen? Und was würde es bringen, so lange, wie es vermutlich dauern würde? Überlegungen, die in wenigen Sekunden aufblitzen. Anders Katie Patersons Skulptur nur wenige Meter entfernt: ein Plattenspieler, der in Erdrotationsgeschwindigkeit Vivaldis “Vier Jahreszeiten” abspielt – eine Runde am Tag. Aber Moment: Nach innen verjüngen sich die Kreise. Verlangsamt sich das Gerät? Dehnt sich die Zeit? Zeit ist eben relativ.
Bis 15. Februar, Di-Sa 11-18 Uhr, Friedrichstr. 123

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