Shades of Today, Picking up the Pieces Post-Truth, Centrum, Berlin


Exhibition opening: Friday, 30 June, 7pm

with a performance by Kirstin Burckhardt, 8pm

The concept of distorted representations and perceptions of reality may date as far back as Plato’s allegory of the cave. However, in light of Brexit and Trump’s election, the manipulation of information seems to have reached new heights (Oxford Dictionaries dubbed ‘post-truth’ as 2016’s word of the year). Amidst the confusion between true facts and fake news, heightened by 24-hour news cycles, social media and a populist rhetoric, artists play a pivotal role in warning and reminding of reality’s different shades and how they can be exploited by those in power. For Shades of Today: Picking up the Pieces Post-Truth, Centrum have invited ten artists to shed light on this issue through a series of sound, scent, text-based, and video installations, and a suite of events.

During this year’s 48 Hours Neukölln festival, Centrum will present a prelude to the exhibition Shades of Today: Picking up the Pieces Post-Truth through a series of video and audio works and a light box installation: In Game Call (2017) Hana Sackler combines artificial and recorded everyday sounds with diverse video sequences that shift and gradually intensify in rhythm and quantity of audio and visual stimuli, creating an environment overloaded with contradictory information which emulates our media-saturated way of life. Stefano Miraglia’s experimental film Anoche (2017) was produced in the UK in direct response to the Brexit vote, evoking the ancient myth of the Minotaur and the sensation of disorientation and anguish – ‘When Rome is dust the Minotaur will moan, once more in the endless dark of its rank palace’ (Jorge Luis Borges). In Martin Cries (2017) Jonathan Vinel confronts viewers with the emotional impact of loss, alienation, sadness, rage, and violence within a virtual game, questioning the authenticity of our closeness not only to each other but also to ourselves. Kirstin Burckhardt’s sound piece Imagination is a Powerful Tool (2016) is a fictitious ‘Ted Talk’ that draws attention to the fine line between experiencing and imagining and brings perceptions of truth and reality into play. Max Grau’s ‘kinda sorta manifesto’ reclaim your fucked up-ness… maybe (2016) talks about staying in bed a lot, the precarious state of self-employment and ‘how you should have sips of champagne in bed, even when you are alone’. In his confessional audio work Grau reflects on the dissonance many a creative freelancer experiences today, between creating and maintaining a successful virtual persona while being in denial about the absurdity and difficulties faced in real life. 2+2=5 (2016) is the title of a project by Jae Kyung Kim featuring a light box, which shows collages of photos downloaded from Google Street View in which houses have been partially blurred due to Germany’s privacy policy and attempt to legally regulate the US-American technology company’s collection and use of geographic image data.

The group exhibition Shades of Today: Picking up the Pieces Post-Truth will open on the 30th of June with a performance by Kirstin Burckhardt: Grow a Body (2017) centres around a rhythmic, pulsating reading of a text which poses the question: When is your body complete? This question is echoed in the feeling of some people who disidentify so strongly with a ligament that they self-amputate (‘Body Integrity Identity Disorder’). In the performance, this feeling is carefully embedded within the sensation of completely dissociating from your body when in a traumatic situation, raising questions about subjective and alternative truths, the relationship between alienation and violence, and the prevalence of emotion over reason – questions considered to be at the core of our post-truth era. Included in the exhibition will be Archaeology of a Smell (2008), a scent installation by Erkan Öznur which uses ‘Wofasept’, a cleaning liquid produced by a former GDR company which until today was primarily used in the former East. The persistent smell makes the city’s former division apparent today. As an alternative to the iconic Berlin wall Archaeology of a Smell offers a symbol for the reality of the slow, on-going process of reunification. Martin John Callanan’s Wars During My Lifetime (1982-2013) is a newspaper that lists all of the wars fought during the artist’s lifetime (up until 2013). Listed without comment, the newspaper acts as a potent reminder of media bias and sensationalisation. With her sound sculpture Ram-tam-tam! Rat-a-tat-tat! (2014), Emma Waltraud Howes utilises a resonating cast iron pot as a symbol of resistance, both acknowledging historical protests by recalling the ‘Cacerolazo’, a cacophony of banging pots and pans, while humorously evoking the feeling of help- and speechlessness in the face of recent political developments and the impossibility and lack of rational debate. In a similarly ironic gesture Benedikt Partenheimer’s Business As Usual (2016) draws attention to one of the most debated yet controversial topics in politics: pollution and climate change. Printouts of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change line the wall and act as backdrop to a dramatic photograph of an urban landscape concealed by smog. Covering the factual information on climate change, the picture itself fails to serve as photographic evidence with the pollution having rendered the photograph illegible. As part of the exhibition Jae Kyung Kim will show a set of three stereoscopes showing pictures of houses blurred on Google Street View related to her project 2+2=5 (2016) in which the artist explores questions of privacy, transparency, visibility and social control, and also speculates about the effect the blurred images have on our collective imagination, emphasising that it relies on what we think we know and what we imagine we see.

To support and expand on the exhibition in Centrum’s physical space, our Tumblr is a virtual space to further develop and explore notions of post-truth and for six weeks we will post starting points for further research here. The material will be grouped into themes and will show how people, including artists and thinkers, are experiencing the world right now and communicating their most pressing concerns. The themes will include the subjectivity inherent Information Systems, Alternative RealitiesProtest, Sensory Experience, and acute insights into How we Live Now.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies
11th May – 10th June 2017

This exhibition comprises a trilogy of interconnected works that examines the role of technology and data and how it relates to the human condition in an age of hyper information. In a world dominated by digital media and the instant accessibility of information, his practice crosses the boundary between art and science to reveal the paradox of the promise of infinite knowledge and an absolute vision against its impossibility due to the transient nature of human perception.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

The Fundamental Units: The lowest denomination coin from each of the world’s 166 active currencies are photographed to vast scale using an infinite focus, optical 3D microscope. Printed to a size of 1.2 x 1.2 metres from files with over 400 million pixels, the hyper-real level of detail, beyond normal vision, reveals the material construction and make-up of the coin together with the marks and traces from their circulation and use as tokens of exchange.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

A Planetary Order: This is a 3D scale model of the earth showing cloud cover from one single moment in time. Raw information from one second’s worth of readings from all six cloud monitoring satellites overseen by NASA and ESA is transformed into a physical visualisation of real-time scientific data that delicately outlines and profiles the clouds emerging across the sphere. The sphere, or globe, has no added colour, only the sculpted whiteness of the raw material that throws a maze of faint shadows across the structure.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Text Trends: This looks at our perception of words and data when displayed in graphical form. Through animation, it uses Google data to explore the content generated by search queries and reduces this process to its essential elements: search terms -vs- frequency searched over time, presented in the form of a graph. The viewer watches the animation plot out the ebb and flow of search terms generated by internet users around the world. Pairs of words such as ‘now and later’ and ‘summer and winter’ play out matter-of-factly, with all the passion of a market index. Originally an animation, it has also been commissioned as a series of prints.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

I Wanted to See All of the News From Today: collects everyday over 600 front covers of newspapers from around the world.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Argentea Gallery

Data Soliloquies, exhibition. Essay by Thierry Fournier

Data Soliloquies, exposition. Essai par Thierry Fournier

Opening invite

Argentea Gallery
28 St Paul’s SquareBirmingham B3 1RB
United Kingdom

Data Soliloquies, exhibition. Essay by Thierry Fournier

Martin John Callanan, Data Soliloquies

en français

In his short story “The Library of Babel”, published in 1944, the Argentinian author Jorge Luis Borges imagines the whole of human culture brought together in a labyrinthine library. The books it contains represent the obsessive organisation of all conceivable human thought, in every language and from its beginnings. The concept harks back to the idea that knowledge could ultimately be grasped in its entirety, leading to mastery and omnipotence.

The artwork of Martin John Callanan (Birmingham, 1982) inevitably recalls this literary allusion, but it is immediately clear that it illustrates the way in which our relationship with technology has exactly reversed the terms of its argument. In contrast to Borges, who imagined that all knowledge could be made visible in one place, Callanan acknowledges that today we live in a decentralised information network that irrevocably determines the way we live. When he describes himself as “an artist researching an individual’s place within systems”, the “place” he refers to does not describe an aesthetic relationship in the traditional sense, in which the observer is dissociated from the things observed; it assumes that we are inextricably connected with them.

The exhibition Data Soliloquies establishes a relationship between three works that are clearly complementary in this way. The sculpture A Planetary Order features a 3D scale model of the earth, on which a series of satellite data is combined to show the exact state of the Earth’s cloud cover on a given date. It stands on the floor, making it seem vulnerable, and demonstrates that a phenomenon that is so transitory, while at the same time represented by “hard” data, is fundamentally impossible to grasp, and always beyond complete human perception: technology has not overridden what is incommensurable. The printed series Text Trends is a statistical comparison of Google searches for pairs of words, from 2004 to the present. The self-referential nature of the relationships between the chosen words (winter/summer, buy/sell, etc.) and the fierce humour that emerges from them, reflect the expectations embodied in these statistics: they represent actual searches of users. Something that might be taken as a single measurement reveals itself to be also an oracle, whose performativity determines our behaviour. Lastly, The Fundamental Units is a series of images each of which shows the smallest value coin used in various national currencies, photographed using a 3D optical microscope at the National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, UK. These images are then expanded and printed in extra-large formats, so that they show the all traces of the handling they have undergone, and thus the paradoxical physicality of money, whose exchange is now entirely dematerialised.

Despite their power and clear visual precision, these objects sometimes appear cold, as if placed at a distance: the white earth, statistics, coins. They are the product of a conceptual, minimalist approach that emphasises protocol. In addition, they contain no trace of the artist: unlike other recent conceptual works which compare human physicality with repetitive systems, as in the case of Roman Opalka or On Kawara, Martin John Callanan does not introduce his own actions into his work, or only very rarely. Moreover and strictly speaking, it hardly matters if we know the positions of the clouds on a given date, the development of Google searches or the way in which the coins in our pockets have aged: in themselves these facts and these objects include nothing that would give them the status of an artwork. In that case, where do we get the feeling that these works speak so profoundly about ourselves?

It is at once clear that what these artworks have in common is that they talk about value, and its direct connection with the way generalised quantification has become the dominant paradigm and the universal criterion for representing and evaluating human affairs. Callanan also addresses the idea of value from a very specific point of view, namely an almost deliberate focus on representing totalities. An overview of his work reveals the consistency of that approach, seen even in their titles: every flight departure, every internet search, every war waged during the artist’s lifetime, all his actions when using software, every telephone number, the number of people who have ever lived, the number of days of his life, every newspaper front-page, every cloud present above the earth at a given moment, to visit the whole of London, and so on. This approach may seem simplistic but it selects precisely those phenomena to which our sensory experience never gives us complete access. Given that the world of data is characterised by the very fact that the global calculations performed by systems are beyond human perception, can artworks reverse that relationship?

We then see that each of these artworks takes a specific physical form, which reflects a profound knowledge of coding, networks and computing, applied to a wide range of forms: sculptures, prints, artists’ books, objects or performances. Using this vocabulary, Callanan offers a parallel set of “aiming devices” that connect the various totalities in order to show more clearly that we can never have complete control over them: having departure times appear briefly on a screen or a town crier proclaim the dates of wars; printing the clouds on a 3D sculpture that cannot be seen as a whole; demonstrating the performative nature of statistics and opinion polls and the physicality of money, or creating a publication that cannot be read due to its enormous scale. Each of these situations creates a paradox: they open up a divide between, on the one hand, the promise of omniscience and a totalising vision, and on the other, its impossibility, due to the inevitably fugitive and local nature of human perception. It is in this gap, this falling-short, that the agency of Callanan’s works resides.

In this way, by creating a very specific relationship between these successive stages –value, totality, promise and falling-short – Callanan reveals what we expect from these representations. It is a question not so much of value itself, than the desire for value; less one of totality than the dream of totality, less one of control than of what eludes it. All of these issues bring us back to the human condition, its desires and its limitations. This is where we find the poetic but also the profoundly critical aspects of a body of work that brings us face to face with the multiple manifestations of the infinite, only to assert our inability to embrace it. The artwork also emphasises the radically futile nature of all approaches that place an excessive emphasis on technology. What differentiates us from the “systems” invoked by the artist is that we also find meaning in things we do not understand.

This brings to mind the writer and critic John Berger, who showed that one of the specific characteristics of art is not to represent things in themselves but to identify the way we see them, enabling us to interrogate the ways in which that experience is formed and determined, including politically. At a time when many projects facing the issues raised by digital cultures fall into the trap of the figuration (of data, artificial intelligence, surveillance and so on), Martin John Callanan assumes the vain character of such an approach and positions himself at a point where his research leads us to a vertigo. With his characteristic modesty, with his works, their “data soliloquies” and the way they suggest that we would never seize them, he illuminates the specificity of the human’s condition vis-à-vis the immensity of the world.

Thierry Fournier
Aubervilliers, April 2017

Thierry Fournier is a French artist and curator. He also co-directs the curatorial research group Ensad Lab Displays. He lives and works in Aubervilliers.

Translation Imogen Forster

en français

Data Soliloquies, exposition. Essai par Thierry Fournier

in English

Dans sa nouvelle La Bibliothèque de Babel publiée en 1944, l’écrivain argentin Jorge Luis Borges imagine la totalité de la culture humaine exposée dans une bibliothèque à l’architecture labyrinthique. Les livres qu’elle rassemble contiennent toute la pensée imaginable, dans toutes les langues et depuis les origines, obsessionnellement mis en ordre. L’ensemble évoque la promesse d’accéder enfin à la totalité de la connaissance, à travers le rêve d’une maîtrise et d’une toute-puissance du savoir.

Si le travail de Martin John Callanan (Birmingham, 1982) évoque immanquablement cette image littéraire, c’est pour constater aussitôt qu’il témoigne de la manière dont nos relations à la technologie en ont précisément renversé les termes. À l’inverse de Borges qui imaginait que l’ensemble du savoir puisse être visible en un seul lieu, Callanan prend acte que l’humain contemporain est pris dans un réseau d’informations décentralisées qui conditionnent en permanence son existence. Lorsqu’il se décrit comme « an artist researching an individual’s place within systems » (un artiste explorant la place de l’individu parmi des systèmes), la « place » qu’évoque l’artiste ne décrit pas une relation esthétique au sens classique qui dissocierait l’observateur des objets observés : elle prend acte que nous sommes pris dans leurs logiques.

L’exposition Data Soliloquies met ainsi en relation trois œuvres dont les propos sont particulièrement complémentaires à cet égard. La sculpture A Temporary Order figure le globe terrestre en impression 3D à petite échelle, sur lequel est gravé l’état exact des nuages à une date donnée, obtenue par la combinaison de séries d’images par satellite. Posée au sol, comme vulnérable, elle met en évidence qu’un phénomène aussi fugitif, même figé et représenté par ses données, demeure radicalement insaisissable et continue à échapper à notre perception : la technique n’a pas désactivé l’incommensurable. La série d’impressions Text Trends montre quant à elle des statistiques comparées de paires de mots issues des requêtes sur Google de 2004 à nos jours. Le caractère tautologique des associations de mots choisis et l’humour féroce qui s’en dégage (été-hiver, acheter-vendre, etc.) témoigne des attentes que reflètent ces statistiques : il s’agit bien de requêtes formulées par des utilisateurs. Ce que l’on pourrait prendre comme une seule mesure est aussi un oracle, dont la dimension performative conditionne nos comportements. Enfin, The Fondamental Units est une série d’images montrant chaque fois les plus petites unités de pièces de monnaies internationales, photographiées au microscope électronique au National Physical Laboratory de Teddington (Royaume-Uni). Ces images sont ensuite démesurément agrandies et imprimées sur de très grands formats, révélant alors toutes les traces des échanges dont elles ont été l’objet – et, par la même, la physicalité paradoxale d’une monnaie dont les échanges sont aujourd’hui entièrement dématérialisés.

Malgré leur force et leur précision plastique évidente, ces objets sont parfois froids, comme mis à distance : globe blanc, statistiques, pièces de monnaie. Ils héritent d’une approche conceptuelle et minimaliste qui privilégie les protocoles. En outre, toute trace de l’artiste en est absente : par opposition à des démarches qui, dans l’histoire de l’art récente, ont confronté l’humain et sa corporéité à des systèmes répétititifs, comme celles de Roman Opalka ou de On Kawara, Martin John Callanan – à de très rares exceptions – ne met pas en jeu ses propres actions. En outre, à strictement parler, peu nous importe de savoir quelles étaient les positions des nuages à une date donnée, de connaître l’évolution de requêtes sur Google ou encore comment vieillit la petite monnaie : ces faits ou ces objets en eux-mêmes n’évoquent rien qui les rapprocheraient du statut d’une œuvre. Comme extraits du monde, ils semblent être des objets trouvés dans un champ de données. D’où nous vient alors le sentiment que ces œuvres nous parlent aussi profondément de nous-mêmes ?

Le premier constat qui émerge alors est que ces œuvres ont toutes en commun de parler de la valeur, qui interroge directement la manière dont la quantification généralisée s’est imposée aujourd’hui comme paradigme dominant et comme critère omniprésent de représentation et d’évaluation de l’humain. Callanan convoque en outre cette notion de valeur à travers une perspective très spécifique, qui est de viser presque systématiquement la représentation de totalités. Un regard sur l’ensemble de ses œuvres témoigne de la constance de cette démarche, que l’on retrouve même dans leurs titres : toutes les partances de vols, toutes les recherches sur internet, toutes les guerres pendant ma vie, toutes mes commandes sur un logiciel, tous les numéros de téléphone, le nombre de tous ceux qui ont jamais vécu, le compte de tous les jours de ma vie, toutes les unes de la presse, tous les nuages présents en un instant au-dessus de la Terre, voir tout Londres, etc. Cette démarche de all-everything pourrait sembler simpliste mais elle sélectionne justement des phénomènes auquel notre expérience sensible ne nous donne jamais totalement accès. Alors que le régime des données se caractérise justement par le fait que des totalités calculées par des systèmes échappent à la perception humaine, des œuvres peuvent-elle renverser cette relation ?

On voit alors que ces projets déploient chaque fois une matérialité spécifique, qui témoigne d’une connaissance approfondie du code, du réseau et du numérique tout en embrassant un très large répertoire de formes : sculptures, impressions, livres d’artiste, objets, performances… À travers ce vocabulaire, Callanan propose autant de dispositifs de « visée », qui relatent des totalités pour mieux mettre en évidence l’impossibilité de leur maîtrise : faire fugitivement défiler les horaires de vols sur un écran, faire déclamer les dates des guerres par un crieur, imprimer les nuages sur une sculpture en 3D dont la perception globale est impossible, démontrer le caractère performatif des statistiques et des sondages, mettre en évidence la matérialité de la monnaie, créer une publication devenant illisible par son échelle gigantesque, etc. Chacune de ces situations crée alors un paradoxe : elle ouvre un gouffre entre d’une part la promesse d’une omniscience ou d’une vision totalisante, et d’autre part son impossibilité même, due au caractère irrémédiablement fugitif et local de notre perception. C’est dans cet écart, dans ce manque, que réside fondamentalement l’agentivité de ses œuvres.

Ainsi, par la relation très spécifique que Martin John Callanan élabore entre ces paliers successifs – la valeur, la totalité, la promesse et le manque – il met en évidence ce que nous attendons de ces représentations. Il ne s’agit pas tant de la valeur, que du désir de la valeur ; de la totalité, que du rêve de la totalité ; de la maîtrise, que de ce qui lui échappe. L’ensemble nous ramène à la condition humaine, à son désir et et à ses limites. Ici se revèle la dimension à la fois poétique et fondamentalement critique d’un travail qui nous place face à de multiples manifestations de l’infini pour pointer immédiatement notre impossibilité à l’embrasser, en même temps que le caractère radicalement vain à cet égard de toute démarche techniciste. Ce qui nous différencie des « systèmes » qu’évoque l’artiste est que nous trouvons aussi du sens dans ce que nous ne comprenons pas.

On peut penser ici enfin à l’auteur et critique John Berger, qui relevait qu’une des spécificités de l’art est de ne pas représenter les choses en elles-mêmes mais bien le regard que nous portons sur elles et, par la même, de pouvoir questionner les enjeux de sa formation et de sa détermination (y compris politique). Au moment où, en prise avec les questions ouvertes par la culture numérique, de nombreuses démarches tombent dans le piège de la figuration (des données, de l’intelligence artificielle, de la surveillance…), Martin John Callanan assume ici l’impossibilité radicale d’en venir à bout et s’installe là où cette recherche ouvre sur un vertige. Avec la pudeur qui le caractérise, par ses œuvres, leurs monologues de données et l’incapacité qu’elles évoquent de nous en emparer complètement, il éclaire ainsi la spécificité de la position humaine face à l’infini du monde.

Thierry Fournier
Aubervilliers, avril 2017

Thierry Fournier est un artiste et curateur français. Il co-dirige également le groupe de recherche curatorial EnsadLab Displays. Il vit et travaille à Aubervilliers.

in English

Im Dialog mit Amazon – Mallorca Zeitung – Nr. 882 – 30. März 2017

Der britische Künstler Martin John Callanan zeigt bei Horrach Moyà das Wechselspiel von System und Mensch, Von Brigitte Kramer

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Eigentlich müssten wir alle unter Atemnot oder Platzangst leiden. Denn immer dichter legen sich die Fäden des weltweiten digitalen Netzes um uns. Immer mehr Stun- den verbringen wir vor kleinen oder großen Bildschirmen, geben Daten ein, hinterlassen Spuren. Einen Teil der Zeit im Internet verbringen wir mit Dingen, die nicht unbedingt lebensnotwendig sind. Martin John Callanan geht es nicht anders. Nur verbringt er sei- ne Zeit im Netz mit Sinnvollem. Er macht Kunst. Derzeit zeigt er sie in der Galerie Horrach Moyà an der Plaça de la Drassana.

„Martin has been alive +12858 days“, schreibt er auf seiner Web- site. Für alle Leser, die das Spiel mit Zahlen weniger lieben als Callanan: Er wurde 1982 in einer Kleinstadt bei Birmingham gebo- ren. Seit mehr als fünf Jahren lebt er in Berlin und wird als Künst- ler von der ehrwürdigen Royal Society of Arts gefördert. Damit steht er in einer Reihe mit Charles Dickens, Karl Marx oder Benja- min Franklin. Nach Palma hat ihn der Kunsthistoriker Pau Waelder gebracht. Es ist die vierte Ausstel- lung des Briten auf der Insel.

Callanan interessiert das Thema Individuum und System. In seinen Installationen unter- sucht er die Interaktion zwischen Mensch und Netz, zeichnet die Interaktion nach. Oft übernimmt oder verändert er die Funktions- weise von Programmen, Syste- men oder Anwendungen und deu- tet sie neu. Damit hinterfragt er die Zustände, demontiert unsere Gewohnheiten und sorgt auch noch für Witz und Überraschung. Der Effekt sitzt auch deshalb, weil seine Arbeiten so clean, so zurückhaltend und unterkühlt wir- ken: Bildschirme, Kleingedruck- tes, ordentlich Aufgereihtes. Im Gespräch mit ihm wird schnell die Tragweite seiner Arbeit deutlich. Dem uninformierten Besucher der Ausstellung „Actions“ entgeht sie aber, ist zu befürchten.

 

Drei Arbeiten, alle schon ein- mal ausgestellt, bilden die Schau. Da ist „I Cannot Not Communica- te“ von 2015: Eine Reihe von hun- dert Büchern auf einem blanken Holztisch. Daneben liegt eine Lis- te mit allen ausgestellten Titeln. „Das sind die Bücher, die Amazon mir zum Lesen empfiehlt“, sagt er mit einem leichten Lächeln in den Mundwinkeln. Er hat tatsächlich den Spruch „Kunden, die Artikel in Ihrem Einkaufswagen gekauft haben, haben auch Folgendes ge- kauft“ ernst genommen und die hundert ersten Empfehlungen in den Einkaufswagen gelegt. Da- runter sind Fantasy-Romane oder ein Buch auf Französisch, „dabei kann ich gar kein Französisch!“, sagt Callanan. Andere Empfeh- lungen sind einleuchtender: Bü- cher über Kunst, Soziologie, Phi- losophie, von Zygmunt Bauman, Ulrich Beck oder John Berger.

 

Seitdem er im Mai 2015 auf Amazon gehört hat, ist Callanan nicht mehr normaler Kunde des Online-Geschäfts. „Ich bin mit dem System in Beziehung getre- ten“, sagt er mit leiser Stimme, „vielleicht lüfte ich irgendwann das Geheimnis seines Algorith- mus.“ Callanan wird weiterhin auf Amazon hören, immer wieder Empfehlungen kaufen und dabei versuchen, das System zu ent- schlüsseln. Das Ziel dieser Spie- lerei wäre in dem unwahrscheinli- chen Fall erreicht, wenn Callanan schon vorher wüsste, was Ama- zon ihm empfehlen wird. Es wird immer schwieriger, den Beweis zu liefern, dass der Mensch dem Computer überlegen ist.

 

Noch mehr witzige Tüfteleien gibt’s im zentralen, mit gepfleg- ten, alten Bodenfliesen ausge- legten Raum. „Each and Every Command“ heißt die Arbeit von 2016. Sie zeigt auf sechs hellen Tischen elf dicke, graue Ordner. In ihnen sind auf hellgrauem Re- cyclingpapier „4.144.676 Wör- ter in 198.605 Zeilen“ gedruckt, wie Callanan sagt. Inhaltlich sa- gen sie gar nichts: Es ist die vom Programm Adobe Photoshop ge- speicherte Chronik der Arbeit, die Callanan in den vergangenen zwölf Jahren geleistet hat. Das Programm hat jeden Schritt bei seiner Bearbeitung von Fotos für die Nachwelt aufbewahrt: Callanan zeigt dieses Bemü- hen nun der Welt. Fast schon rührend sind die unsinnig vie- len Seiten, „acht Mal so viel wie Shakespeares Gesamtwerk“, sagt Callanan wieder mit diesem leich- ten Grinsen.

 

Die exponierte Emsigkeit des Programms wirft Fragen auf, zu Sinn und Unsinn von Archiven, von Erinnerung, von Lernen. Und die Installation hinterfragt auch den Mythos vom kreativen Prozess, dem Work in Progress: Wie wichtig ist es, die Arbeitsschritte eines Künstlers zu dokumentieren?

Trotz aller Ironie und Selbstre- ferenz gibt es „Each and Every Command“ als digitale Version in der British Library, und im Ama- zon Kindle Store kann man das Werk für zwei Pfund zum Lesen auf einem E-Reader kaufen: Nicht ganz so spannend wie die Lektüre eines Telefonbuchs.

 

Die dritte Arbeit „Departure of All“ aus dem Jahr 2013 schließ- lich stimuliert die Fantasie des Betrachters ungemein – wenn man weiß oder intuitiv erfasst, worum es geht. Callanan hat eine Anzeigetafel mit Abflugzeiten an die Wand montiert. Bei längerer Betrachtung bemerkt man, dass es sich um einen fiktiven Flughafen handeln muss. Nein, es ist die An- zeige aller Flüge, die in Echtzeit von einem internationalen Flugha- fen abheben. Die Anzeige scrollt immer weiter oben, immer neue Flüge rutschen von unten nach, sie sind alle real und die Maschinen rollen im Moment des Betrachtens irgendwo über eine Startbahn. „Man bemerkt, wie eng alles ver- knüpft ist am Himmel“, sagt Pau Waelder, „und dabei kann einem schnell ein bisschen schwinde- lig werden.“ Der blaue Himmel taucht vor dem inneren Auge auf, durchzogen von weißen Kondens- streifen, immer dichter werden sie, irgendwann ist das Netz so dicht, dass man kaum noch das Blau des Himmels sieht. Man könnte Atemnot oder Platzangst bekommen: Das Netz ist überall, nicht nur hinter einem Bildschirm.

Actions, Galería Horrach Moyà

Actions
Galería Horrach Moyà
25/3 – 7/5/2017

The work of Martin John Callanan focuses on the relationship between individuals and the systems that determine their existence, whether natural, economic, social, political, or that invisible and omnipresent data network in which we all participate. Placing himself at the centre of this research, not as a protagonist, but as a simple individual who is affected by the same systems that dominate us all, the artist elaborates patient and laborious processes with the data that he collects from his interaction with the world. The result of these processes are works that refer to both a personal experience and a condition shared by a large part of the inhabitants of the planet.

As Robert Musil states in The Man Without Qualities (1930), “living permanently in a well-ordered State has an out-an-out spectral aspect: one cannot step into the street or drink a glass of water or get into a tram without touching the perfectly balanced levers of a gigantic apparatus of laws and relations…” This apparatus, which according to Musil becomes so invisible that we deny its existence “as the common man denies the existence of the air,” is what Callanan explores in his work: each action of an individual is recorded by the system and produces some reaction, which becomes visible in the artworks selected for this exhibition.

Horrach-Moyà presents in this, Callanan’s second solo show in the gallery, a selection of recent works that explore diverse forms of representing the relation between the individual and the data that he generates, either through what he consumes, produces, or even where he goes. The works move fluidly between the intimate and the impersonal, between the analog and the digital, capturing a small part of a set processes that will not stop until the individual that generates them or the systems that sustain them cease to exist.

Pau WaelderCurator

 

 

I Cannot Not Communicate
2015

In this work, the artist has collected the first 100 books recommended to him by Amazon, based on everything he read and bought since the online retail giant first launched its recommendation algorithm over 15 years ago.

The title refers to the condition of the user of any service on the Web as an involuntary transmitter of information: since the data concerning the actions of the user (day and time of access, duration, contents browsed and so forth) are registered automatically, it is no longer possible to be a mere receiver of information. Rahter, one constantly participates in a data exchange that leads to modifying the same contents that one is accessing. This reflection is not presented as a complex technological installation but as something as simple as a library, which becomes a record of the subject that have interested the artist, although this record was not created by him but has been elaborated by Amazon’s algorithm. These books are not necessarily those that Martin John Callanan has read, but those that he supposedly wants to read.

 

Each and Every Command
2016

This piece shows all edits done by the artist on the photo editing software Adobe Photoshop during twelve years, from December 23, 2003 to February 7, 2016. Registered automatically by the program, they are presented as a long list on 15,873 pages in DIN A4 gray paper, bound in 11 volumes. There are altogether 4,144,676 words in 198,605 lines of text, which corresponds to eight times the complete works of William Shakespeare. A record of this file is preserved in digital format at the British Library.

With this work, Martin John Callanan suggests the possibility of recording each of the actions performed in a computer, while exploring the romantic myth of artistic creation: the fascination for the creative process of the artist and the conception of the studio as a magical and intimate place where his inspiration is gleaned, translate into a sober file that methodically collects every action carried out by the artist on an image editing software. Reading this register, it is possible (if one can take an amount of time that perhaps exceeds human capacities) to follow the steps of the artist’s working process, both in the elaboration of a work and when editing his website or retouching a holiday photo. The deep knowledge of his work can be found here, buried among thousands of banal data, in a diary as comprehensive as it is, paradoxically, absurd.

 

Departure of All
2013

Displayed as an airport information panel, a screen shows all flights that are taking off from all international airports in the world, in real time. The time of departure, flight number, city of origin and destination are displayed in a sober list. Every five seconds, two or three new flights appear on the screen, as the list continues to slowly scroll upwards. The global air traffic is summed up in a small set of data that invite us to reflect on the fact that, at all times, there are approximately 500,000 people flying at forty thousand feet.

The speed with which the list is updated indicates an incessant need to move that forms a picture of our globalized society and the impact that our restless lifestyle (particularly nomadic in the art world) has on the environment. The relatively daily act of catching an airplane is actually an action that is part of a precise machinery that works on a global scale: as passengers, we participate in a flow of coordinated activities whose effects are transmitted from one hemisphere to the other. Altering this flow (as occurred, for example, with the eruptions of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in 2010) is chaotic, and therefore it can not be stopped, as the endless list on the screen never stops.

Designing The One Minute, Het Nieuwe Instituut

Het Nieuwe Instituut presents Designing The One Minute

From 16 until 23 March 2017, Designing The One Minute, curated by Yin Aiwen will be exhibited at Het Nieuwe Instituut.

Yin Aiwen started a design investigation of The One Minutes chronicle 1998-2016. The series consists of 36 One Minutes by designers and artists revealing how technology changes aesthetics, perception and reflection; an experiment where technology becomes poetry.

In March, the series tours museums and cultural organisations with a subscription to The One Minutes Series.

Participating artists:

Joris Nouwens
Hendrik Niefeld
Antonis Pittas
Persijn Broersen
Margit Lukács
Dario Bardic
Heerko van der Kooij
Bart Stolle
Su Tomesen
Matthias Hederer
Ryan Oduber
Mitsuharu Nakagawa
Patrick Doan
Gijs van der Lelij
Thijs Geritz
Sagi Groner
Gaston Slaets
Vassilis Noulas and Manolis Tsipos
Lauren Alexander
Eng Chuen Chuah
Omar Ahmed Awad
Martin John Callanan
Arno Coenen
Alisha Frijters
Lauren Grusenmeyer
Donna Verheijden
Stëfan Schäfer
Persijn Broersen, Margit Lukács and Zahid Jaffar
Fons Schiedon
Kevin Bray
Maartje Smits
Andrea Karch
Minhong Yu
Arthur Röing Baer
Cyanne van den Houten
Agnieszka Zimolag

Yin Aiwen is a designer and researcher based in Amsterdam. She graduated from Design Department of Sandberg Instituut Amsterdam in 2013. Her work focuses on new possibilities of design practice in the ever-changing technological and political environment. Her recent research on ‘designer films’ investigates the new position of design thinking in filmmaking, resulting in a series of writings and events.

The One Minutes is a global network devoted to moving image.

Every month, a different artist is asked to put together a new series of 60-second films that investigate how we perceive and engage with moving image. Museums and cultural organisations around the world subscribe to the series.

Press Release PDF

Het Nieuwe Instituut
Overschiestraat 188
1062 XK Amsterdam NL
info@theoneminutes.org

theoneminutes.org

Real time. Art en temps real

Lo Pati – Centre d’Art
del 27 de gener al 19 de març de 2017

En la nostra societat accelerada, lo temps esdevé una preocupació principal a mesura que intentem mantenir-nos al corrent dels grans esdeveniments que tenen lloc a escala global, intentem ser competitius fent més en menys temps, i vivim en un estat de connexió permanent. Lo terme “realtime” (temps real) s’ha convertit en un terme d’ús comú que fa referència a qualsevol procés que es produix de forma sincronitzada amb lo temps de l’usuari, al fer de “ser allà” i “ser present” en una era que no permet lo més mínim retard en la reacció.

Lo terme “realtime” (temps real), provinent de la informàtica, s’ha convertit en un terme d’ús comú: sovint fa referència, no només a la computació reactiva, sinó també a qualsevol procés que es produix de forma sincronitzada amb lo temps de l’usuari, al fer de “ser allà” i “ser present” en una era que no permet lo més mínim retard en la reacció.

En lo món de l’art, lo temps és un element crucial en un fet sovint ignorat: la duració de la contemplació de l’obra d’art per part de l’espectador. Com indica Boris Groys, mentre que en los mitjans tradicionals lo temps necessari per a la contemplació és determinat per l’usuari, l’art basat en processos temporals (nous mitjans i performance) passa este control a l’obra. Hi ha, així, un temps de l’obra al qual l’espectador ha d’adaptar el seu propi temps. En la majoria de les obres de cinema i video, lo temps de la ficció se comprimix per a permetre a l’espectador observar els esdeveniments que tindrien lloc durant un llarg període de temps en uns pocs minuts. Però, què succeix quan una obra d’art té lloc en “temps real”, desenvolupant la seua història al llarg de diverses hores, mesos o dècades?

Comissariada per Pau Waelder, Real time. Art en temps real és una exposició col·lectiva que explora l’ús del temps en l’art contemporani presentant una selecció d’obres d’art en les quals lo concepte de “temps real” té un paper principal, ja sigue pel qüestionament de la relativitat del temps, l’ús de dades extretes en temps real d’Internet o per la seua intenció de crear una visió actual, “realista” i sempre canviant del temps en què vivim. Amb obres de Guillem Bayo, Clara Boj i Diego Díaz, Martin John Callanan, Thierry Fournier, Nicolas Maigret, Antoine Schmitt, Thomson and Craighead, Addie Wagenknecht i Carlo Zanni, algunes de les peces seleccionades se nodrixen de la informació que apareix constantment als mitjans de comunicació, mentre altres extreuen dades de diferents fonts, establixen un procés de producció en temps real o bé proposen un qüestionament de la nostra manera de mesurar el temps i relacionar-nos amb lo present. Les tecnologies que utilitzem actualment en la nostra vida quotidiana tenen un paper principal en estes peces, portant estes reflexions sobre el temps a un àmbit molt proper al públic, que en alguns casos pot interactuar amb l’obra i en d’altres ho fa sense saber-ho.
La inauguració de l’exposició serà el divendres 27 de gener a les 20:00h.

http://www.lopati.cat/ca/informacio/exposicions/real-time-art-en-temps-real/351/

Berlin Art Prize 2016

Berlin Art Prize, photo Anastasia Muna

The Berlin Art Prize is pleased to announce the list of nominated artists for the Berlin Art Prize 2016. Chosen from a pool of over 600 Berlin-based applicants through a multi-stage selection process, the nine nominees selected by the jury are:

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Martin John Callanan
Regina de Miguel
Stine Marie Jacobsen
Lindsay Lawson
Lotte Meret
Benedikt Partenheimer
Aurora Sander
Raul Walch
Lauryn Youden

Of the nine nominated artists selected by the jury (Karen Archey, Kito Nedo, Emeka Ogboh, Ahmet Öğüt and Susanne Winterling) and presented in the exhibition and catalog, three will be selected as winners of the Berlin Art Prize. The three winning artists will be awarded a trophy created for the occasion by Berlin-based artist Tomás Saraceno, prize money and a four-week residency in Georgia.

The exhibition will present a broad spectrum of artistic positions – including sculpture, installation, photography, performance and conceptual art. In contrast to previous years, the exhibition will focus on the nominee’s individual artistic positions, with multiple works from each artist.

The exhibition opening on November 11, 2016 will be followed by a special program of events, performances and lectures during the exhibition. All nine positions will also be documented in a publication which will be released on the occasion of the opening. The winners will be announced live for the first time at the awards ceremony at Kühlhaus Berlin on the evening of December 10, 2016 followed by an after party.

( Opening )
Friday, November 11, 2016, 7pm
After Party starting at 10pm

( Award Ceremony )
Saturday, December 10, 2016
8:30 p.m.
After Party starting at 10pm

( Location )
Kühlhaus Berlin
Luckenwalder Straße 3
10963 Berlin

The exhibition will be open November 12 – December 10, Tuesday through Saturday, 1 – 6pm.

http://berlinartprize.com

Data on View, Nanterre Art Space

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La Terrasse, Nanterre Art Space
exhibition from 7 October to 23 December 2016
Opening on Friday 7 October 6-9 pm

Data on view Curators: Sandrine Moreau and Thierry Fournier

Works by Martin John Callanan, Marie-Pierre Duquoc Hasan Elahi, Oyvind Fahlstrom, Ashley Hunt, Mark Lombardi, Philippe Mairesse, Claire Mairieux, Julien Prévieux, Ward Shelley, Ali Tnani and Lukas Truniger Publications by James Bridle, Bureau d’études, Eli Commins, Albertine Meunier, On Kawara, Jacopo da Pontormo, Erica Scourti

Performance by Magali Desbazeilles

La Terrasse window: work in situ by Thierry Fournier Documentation space created with Benoît Ferchaud, La Revue Créatique and L’Agora, Nanterre Centre for Citizen Projects, Nanterre

Digital network: websites and movies by Mark Boulas, Brian Knappenberger, Laura Poitras, Sandy Smolan, Mareike Wegener, etc.

The exhibition Data on view brings together a selection of works that offer interpretations of public or personal data through drawing or code: graphs, drawings, network installations, sculptures, publications… These works are addressing various stakes, sensitive and poetic but also critical or political. They question in particular what we expect from data, and how these expectations are likely to define our vision of the world. In this way, the exhibition offers a historical perspective, ranging from Oyvind Fahlström or Mark Lombardi to young international artists, some of whose works are being shown here for the first time in France. It is supplemented by film and web site documentations, which deals with the issues of empowerment and the appropriation of data by citizens.

LA TERRASSE : NANTERRE ART SPACE 57 Boulevard Pesaro 92000 Nanterre, France
press contact: Sandrine Moreau, sandrine.moreau@nanterre.fr
www.nanterre.fr

Exhibition invite (FR) [PDF]

Exhibition leaflet (FR) [PDF]

Exhibition press release (EN) [PDF]

Exhibition leaflet (EN) [PDF]

Photos Thierry Fournier 2016

Versions conference, EnsadLab, Paris, September 2016

On Wednesday, September 7th and 14th, between 10 am and 7 pm, Thierry Fournier, J. Emil Sennewald and the research group Displays – EnsadLab, EnsAD research Laboratory, Paris, invite you to take part in the discussions: “What do we expect of exhibitions?” as part of the international workshop-conference Versions which will be held at the Maison Populaire de Montreuil.

What becomes of the exhibition, especially in the context of post-digital cultures?Versions, which will take place over the course of two weeks (Sept 5th – 16th), is an international practice, debate and critique workshop-conference to experiment and discuss exhibition forms. It is organized by the Displays research group led by Thierry Fournier and J. Emil Sennewald at EnsadLab, research laboratory of the École nationale supérieure des Arts Décoratifs, Paris – which addresses the exhibition itself as a research situation.

Unlike a curatorial approach starting from a given project to organize works, Versions will take as its starting point suggestions made by stakeholders themselves, in order to reveal an experimentation of the exhibition’s “conditions of possibility”. Participants will work in groups of three for three days: two workshop days and one day of public debates. The process will be documented in real time and a publication will be edited after the event, in late 2016.

Fourteen guests will occupy a single space to conduct experiments in situ, and participate in public meetings and demonstrations: Martin John Callanan, artist, Eli Commins, artist, coordinator for digital policy at French Culture Ministry, Jean Cristofol, philosopher and teacher-researcher at Ecole Supérieure d’Art d’Aix en Provence, Milad Doueihi, historian and chairman for Digital humanities at University Paris-Sorbonne, Laura Gozlan, artist, Yuk Hui, philosopher, associated researcher at the Center for Digital Cultures, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Jan Kopp, artist, teacher (Esacm Clermont-Ferrand), Claire Malrieux, artist, teacher (Ensci, Beaux-arts Hauts-de France) and researcher at EnsadLab, Guilhem Pratz, director and producer, Gaïaland, Mathilde Roman, art critic, curator and teacher-researcher at Pavillon Bosio, Ecole supérieure d’Art de Monaco, Véronique Souben, curator and head of FRAC Haute-Normandie, Ann Stouvenel, curator and head for visual arts at Mains d’Œuvres, Pau Waelder, art critic and curator, Marion Zilio, art critic, curator and head of Young International Artists art fair. This workshop will be held at Maison Populaire de Montreuil, in dialogue with the venue’s team and with Vladimir Demoule and Marie Koch, the 2016 season exhibition curators.We would be delighted if you would consider your participation in this workshop conference’s public meetings on Wednesdays, September 7th and 16th, between 10 am and 7pm. You are cordially invited to weigh in on what you expect of exhibitions today. Please note: your RSVP is required at displays@ensad.fr

More info about Displays and the participants: www.displays.ensadlab.fr
Maison Populaire de Montreuil, 9 bis rue Dombasle 93100 Montreuil, France: map
EnsadLab: www.ensadlab.fr

An event co-organized by the Displays research group, EnsadLab Research Laboratory, coordinated by Thierry Fournier (artist and curator, EnsadLab, Endsad Nancy) and J. Emil Sennewald (art critic and journalist, Esacm, EnsadLab) and the ICCA Labex. EnsadLab / Displays researchers: Gaspard Bébié-Valérian, Thomas Cheneseau, Dorian Reunkrilerk, associated researcher Pauline Gourlet (designer and postgraduate Université Paris 8) and Rahaf Demaskhi (artiste et doctorante University Rennes 2). Thanks to Annie Agopian, Floriane Benjamin, Marie Koch, Vladimir Demoule and the Maison Populaire de Montreuil team.

New Materialisms, Institute for Contemporary Art, Zagreb

New Materialisms (Station 3)

Alexei Blinov, Martin Callanan, Vladislav Knežević, Špela Petrič / Miha Turšič, Goran Trbuljak
15 June 2016 – 9 July 2016
Institute for Contemporary Art, Zagreb
curator Darko Fritz

The New Materialisms series of exhibitions aims at reflexive production tackling historically divergent art practices and discursive fields of Concrete and Conceptual Art related to them, as defined in the 1960s (especially through the notions of modernity and postmodernity), but also with understanding of those practices via perspectives of post-media approaches to art and the post-digital condition of contemporary society. In that sense, the project’s intention is to formulate dialogues among important authors of these previous periods and contemporary practitioners who work within a post-media context, mirroring “organic” conditions while assuming the design of aesthetic experience as important mechanism which has its agency in the process of creating the physical world.

New Materialisms explores the German philosopher Max Bense’s identification of the ‘aesthetic condition’, and his proposition that ‘the aesthetic condition is as material as the physical condition of any observed object’. His analysis pursued the goal of ‘programs for the production of aesthetic conditions’, using early computing machines. Materials relating to the infamous clash at a 1970 panel discussion between Bense and Joseph Beuys, which has been described as ‘the visibly spectacular finale to the project of a rational, mathematically oriented aesthetics’, are included in the project.

New Materialisms is a long-term program of exhibitions conceptualized in a collaborative process that has been taking place among grey) (area – space for contemporary and media art from Korčula, Croatia and HICA (Highlands Institute for Contemporary Art) from Scotland.

Artworks

Alexei Blinov: Open Source Vostok, 2013, installation, 3 holograms
Open Source Vostok invites the viewer on a journey back over 400,000 years, through four kilometers of ice, and through almost cosmic cold, to “touch” the untouchable, to feel the real albeit immaterial, and to see an exact optical copy of the ice core and freshly frozen water in the ancient glacial body of water – Lake Vostok. There is not one laboratory in the world that could provide all the conditions found under its icy suit of armor.Open Source Vostok uses this holographic technique to offer the viewer immediate access to one of the least accessible places on Earth, isolated from the surface for more than 15 million years.The artwork in collaboration with Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (St.Petersburg) and Scientific-production holographic laboratory (St. Petersburg).

Text Trends by Martin John Callanan looks at our perception of words and data when displayed in graphical form. Text Trends deals with the spectacularization of information. Using Google data it explores the vast search data of its users. The animation takes the content generated by search queries and reduces this process to its essential elements: search terms vs. frequency searched for over time, presented in the form of a line graph. The viewer watches the animation plot out the ebb and flow of a series of search terms generated over the last four years by internet users around the world. Pairs of words such as ‘now and later’, ‘summer and winter’ play out matter-of-factly, with all the passion of a market index. Instead of the hyper-interactivity of emerging news aggregators and information readers, Text Trends explores our perception of words though topics like time and politics. The work is an investigation into data use, encouraging criticism on
how the data is generated; prompting the question what does the data actually represent?

Installation Voyager/ non-human agent by Špela Petrič and Miha Turšič uses algorithm and data collected from the instruments from the spacecraft Voyager, which since 1977 has been travelling across the universe. Existing space programs focus mainly on understanding the farthest of our surroundings and on developing technological solutions, but tend to overlook the importance of implementing artistic development practices and methodologies in the form of a basic question: What is it like to be a human in space? Voyager/ Non-human Agent project investigates the possible art forms in outer space, a composite of art and science, and the processes of science culturalization.

Goran Trbuljak: Untitled, 2004, Hand counter, pedestal
The total number of persons who have attended the openings of all my individual exhibitions (those who have attended more than one opening have been counted once), 1970 until now

Vladislav Knežević: Binary Pitch 2013, experimental film, 7’, HD
Architecture of the auditorium is a physical, institutional space and the space which generates meaning. The key ideas from Max Bense’s ‘Aesthetics and Programming’ (1968) are coded in zeros and ones and animated as lifting and lowering the seats. In the geometry of a static shot, elements of architecture and space become the subject of a visual experiment. The video consists of three parts: activation (drawing the auditorium out) – coding (central part) – deactivation (drawing the auditorium in).

http://sivazona.hr/exhibitions/new-materialsims-station-3

Catalogue PDF

Works in series, noshow shop launch

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Tuesday 14 June 2016 6:30-8:30 pm

noshowspace is pleased to launch a gallery shop for Works in series, a collection of unique artworks made in series.

Works in series includes paintings, drawings, documents, artefacts and works on paper, often made in preparation of large-scale or site specific works. Derived from studio practice the works capture the thought processes and creative motivations of the artists involved.

Some works follow conceptual series, such as Martin John Callanan’s legal document that certifies his existence or David Cunningham’s use of an algorithm to arrange the alphabet out of sequence. Others are more loosely bound by preoccupations in the studio. Things to think about while looking at the sky by Shaan Syed are pure pigment screen prints which use the screen of the printing process as a palette to blend one pure hue into another. Caline Aoun also builds a colour field, by repeatedly overprinting onto digital transfer film she generates an unexpected painterly process from inky marks, drips, streaks and mis-registrations.

The shop launches with works by Caline Aoun, Matt Calderwood, Martin John Callanan, David Cunningham, Susanna Heron, Alistair McClymont, Rie Nakajima, Giorgio Sadotti, Daniel Sturgis, Shaan Syed and Serra Tansel. All can be viewed at noshow project space by request or online at www.noshowspace.com

As a small-scale arts organisation noshowspace works closely with artists and works are released for sale in order to help fund exhibitions. Sales from the series equally support the project and the artists, with prices ranging between £90 to £2500, discount rates are available on sets. The portfolio will continue to evolve and grow in response to the gallery programme.

http://www.noshowspace.com/exhibitions/works-series

Full PDF

5th Moscow International Biennale for Young Art – Departure of All

5th International Biennale of Young Art Moscow

5th International Biennale of Young Art Moscow

5th International Biennale of Young Art Moscow

87 young artists and art associations, representatives of 36 countries.

According to the curator, the artists’ touch the most important problem of our time – environmental crisis, blurring the boundaries between “nature” and technology, the interaction of transparency and lack of transparency in the information age. We live in an era of discontinuity. If modernism was trying to get to the bottom – zero of painting, the basic structures of human psychology, and historical laws of economics – that today we do not harbor such illusions. Naturally, now that artists find inspiration in the uncertainty, ambiguity, ciphers and conspiracies, talking about instability and multi-dimensional. ”

The main project of 5th Moscow Biennale of Young Art with the theme Deep inside will be shown from July 1 to August 10 Trekhgornij factory building, one of the oldest textile factories in Moscow. Moscow International Biennale for Young Art held since 2008, its founders and organizers – the Ministry of Culture, Department of Culture of Moscow, National Centre for Contemporary Arts and the Moscow Museum of Modern Art.

The participating artists in the main exhibition “Deep Inside” include:

Ozan Atalan, Turkey — USA
Stacy Belevicheva, Ukraine
Matilde Benmayor, Chile
Julius von Bismarck, Germany
Pamela Breda, Italy
Vladislav Brut, Russia / Alisa Beketova, Kazakhstan — Russia
Ekaterina Burlyga, Ukraine — Germany
Olga Butenop, Russia
Martin Callanan, Great Britain
Noor Ali Chagani, Pakistan
Julian Charrière, Switzerland — Germany
Revital Cohen, Israel / Tuur van Balen, Belgium — Great Britain
Juan Covelli, Colombia — Great Britain
Chris Coy, USA
María Dalberg, Iceland
Jasmin Daryani, Iran — Sweden
Petr Davydtchenko, Russia — Sweden — Great Britain
Jonathan Doweck, Israel
Liat Elbling, Israel
Hüseyin Mert Erverdi, Turkey
Karin Ferrari, Italy — Austria
Christian Fogarolli, Italy
Verena Friedrich, Germany
Veronika Geiger, Denmark — Switzerland
Adam Gibney, Ireland
Iuliana Golub, Ukraine
Florian Goldmann, Germany
Katharina Gruzei, Austria
Logi Leó Gunnarsson, Iceland
Ali Jan Haider, Pakistan
Elisabeth Haust, Russia — Czech Republic
Joey Holder, Great Britain
Marguerite Humeau, France — Great Britain
Marc Johnson, France
Graham Kelly, Great Britain — The Netherlands
Daria Khlapova, Russia
Felix Kiessling, Germany
Paul Kneale, Canada
Fabian Knecht, Germany
Darya Koltsova, Ukraine
Lilia Kosyreva, Russia
Egor Kraft, Russia — Great Britain — Austria
Ksenia Kuleva, Russia
Joshua Leary (Evian Christ), Great Britain / David Rudnick, Great Britain — USA
Juliana Cerqueira Leite, USA
Ekaterina Lukoshkova, Russia
Eli Maria Lundgaard, Norway
Vlad Lunin, Ukraine — Canada
Steve Maher, Ireland — Finland
Nadja Verena Marcin, Germany — USA
Maxime Marion, France / Émilie Brout, France
Zoë Claire Miller, USA — Germany
Alice Miceli, Brasil — The Netherlands
Marina Moskalenko, Russia / Tatiana Smirnova, Russia
Lee Nevo, Israel
Alisa Nikolaeva, Russia — France
Ismael Ogando, Dominican Rebulic
Tim Parchikov, Russia
Pau Pahana, USA — Germany
Claire Paugam, France — Iceland
Davide Quayola, Italy
Marina Ragozina, Russia
Martin Reiche, Germany
Rune Rasmussen, Denmark
Farid Rasulov, Azerbaijan
Paul Rosero Contreras, Ecuador
Vesna Rohaček, Croatia — Sweden
Jeremy Santiago-Horseman, USA
Hadas Satt, Israel
Dagmar Schürrer, Austria — Germany
Julia Selin, Sweden
Jura Shust, Belarus — Belgium
Rustan Söderling, Sweden — The Netherlands
Emmy Skensved, Canada — Germany / Grégoire Blunt, Canada — Germany
Joe Sobel, USA — France
Wilf Speller, Great Britain
Yulia Spiridonova, Russia
Arya Sukapura Putra, Indonesia
Natalia Tikhonova, Russia
Alvaro Urbano, Spain — Germany
Ivar Veermäe, Estonia — Germany
Martin Volman, Argentina — Germany
Addie Wagenknecht, USA — Austria
Beny Wagner, Germany — USA
Andrew Norman Wilson, Germany — USA
Helga Wretman, Sweden — Germany

The fifth Moscow Biennale for Young Art, taking place this summer for six weeks only from July 1-August 10, today announced the participants of the main project “Deep Inside,” curated by Berlin-based independent curator Nadim Samman, who co-organised the fourth Marrakech Biennale in 2012. More recently, Samman was also a curator at the TBA-21 Academy, a branch of the Thyssen-Bornemisza Contemporary foundation in Vienna, and oversaw the Antarctic Pavilion at the 14th Venice Architecture Biennale in 2014.

Taking place in the Trekhgornaya Manufaktura, one of Moscow’s oldest textile mills, the main exhibition will feature 87 works by 93 artists, selected from over 2000 applications, under the curatorial focus of tackling recent issues in ecology and economics. The project will also tackle questions regarding the dangers presented by new technologies and social instability.

“Ours is the time of fissures, of prying apart, of penetration and cavities,” Samman said in a statement. “We are climbing, or falling, ever deeper into a kind of black hole. As we do, it is perhaps to be expected that artists should be fascinated by opacities, by occultations, encryptions and conspiracies—the other side of the event horizon. Also, that they should rhapsodize about instability and polydimensionality. Deep Inside is a view from the chasm,” he explained.

The Moscow Biennale for Young Art was first held in 2008, and grew from the combined efforts of the National Centre for Contemporary Arts (NCCA) and the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (MMOMA) to offer a platform for emerging artists. Now in its fifth iteration, the biennale—commissioned by Ekaterina Kibovskaya—continues its mission to draw attention to a new generation of artists representing recent developments in the global art community.

Trehgornaya_manufacture_bldg-5

Press announcement
Artnet News article

Article in ArtForum

You Are Here, Broken Dimanche Press

You Are Here

Winner at the Prix Charlemagne pour la Jeunesse européennee 2010

An investigation into modes of artistic and political production in contemporary Europe, through an investigation of work being produced in the locus of East and West twenty years after the Mauerfall in Berlin. Using Berlin as a prism, a series of texts and artworks by some of Europe’s finest practitioners are presented in a unique book-object that works through its own layout and design as a physical exhibition.

You Are Here

Ann Cotten
Anna Bro
Agnieszka Drotkiewicz
Martin John Callanan
Volha Martynenka
Francesca Musiani
Christophe Van Gerrewey
Urszula Wozniak

Edited by John Holten & Line Madsen Simenstad

Design by FUK laboratories TM
11 November, 2009
English (with Polish, German, Belarussian, Danish)
ISBN 978-3-00-028868-5

Each and Every Command, Baltic39

Each and Every Command

Each and Every Command is a new artwork – twelve years in the making – on show for the first time this week at Baltic39, Newcastle.

Each and Every Command documents, as on ongoing archive, over twelve years of edits I have made in the popular image editing software Adobe Photoshop (from version 8). Presented in readable text, each and every action, edit, change, mistake, or creation that I have made to my own work, and on behalf of other people, on any computer, from 23 December 2003 until today is recorded in unredacted form. Printed as one complete copy over 15,873 pages on mid-grey A4 paper and bound within eleven archive folders, the 27,504,497 million characters comprise 4,114,676 words over 198,605 lines of text. Equivalent to eight times the Complete Works of William Shakespeare.

To celebrate the first exhibition of the archive, the full record is now available in the Amazon Kindle Store, as the largest ebook ever released. For the next five days, the duration of the Baltic 39 exhibition, the ebook will be free to download.

Real Time, Arts Santa Mònica, Barcelona

Real Time
Art en temps real
Exposició, Arts Santa Mònica
28.01 – 10.04.2016

Guillem Bayo, Clara Boj i Diego Díaz, Martin John Callanan, Grégory Chatonsky, Thierry Fournier, Varvara Guljajeva i Mar Canet, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Nicolas Maigret, Katie Paterson, Antoine Schmitt, Thomson and Craighead, Addie Wagenknecht, Carlo Zanni

FULL EXHIBITION CATALOGUE PDF

real-time

In our society accelerated, time becomes a main concern as we try to keep abreast of major events taking place globally and react to events. We live in a state of permanent connection that leads to anxiety of being part of a present that is not his own, but describing the media and social networks.

The term real time (real time) refers to the ability to display, communicate or react to events when they occur. This term, which is commonly used in computer science, in the media and in all types of stories, denotes a process that occurs synchronously with time the viewer or user. This immediacy means, for example, the ability to interact with a virtual environment, reporting on current events or tell a story that develops over time naturally. This individual is connected with present external or shared driving part of this issue or present an answer. The “real time” is also linked to “be there” or Dasein in the interpretation of Martin Heidegger, which refers to the relationship between the individual and the environment, and indicates that we are all linked to the world we live in and in which we participate. The concept also leads us to question what is “real time” as we measure time and how this measure is relative, but determines our perception of reality.

In the art world, time is a crucial element in a fact often ignored: the length of contemplation of works of art by the viewer. As indicated by Boris Groys, while in traditional media the necessary time for contemplation is determined by the user, process-based temporary art (new media, video and performance) passes this control to work. Usually, the artworks are a special time or action bounded in time, but what happens when a work is developed in the “continuous present” constantly changing and subject to endless process?

“Real Time. Art Real time “presents a selection of contemporary art in which the concept of” real time “has a leading role, either by questioning the relativity of time, using data extracted in real time Internet or their intention to create a vision today, “realistic” and the ever-changing times in which we live. Some of the selected works are fed information that appears on the media, while others extract data from various sources, establish a production process in real time or propose a questioning of the way we measure time and to relate to the present. The technologies we use today in our everyday lives have a major role in these pieces, which brings reflections on time in an area very close to the audience, which in some cases can interact with the work and about others do not know. [Google Translate]

En la nostra societat accelerada, el temps es converteix en una preocupació principal a mesura que intentem mantenir-nos al dia dels grans esdeveniments que tenen lloc a escala global i reaccionar davant dels fets. Vivim en un estat de connexió permanent que ens porta a l’ansietat de formar part d’un present que no és el propi, sinó el que descriuen els mitjans de comunicació i les xarxes socials.

El terme real time (temps real) fa referència a la capacitat de mostrar, comunicar o reaccionar davant dels esdeveniments en el moment en què es produeixen. Aquest terme, que s’utilitza comunament en informàtica, en els mitjans de comunicació i en tot tipus de narracions, denota un procés que es dóna de manera sincronitzada amb el temps de l’espectador o usuari. Aquesta immediatesa es tradueix, per exemple, en la capacitat per interactuar amb un entorn virtual, informar sobre successos actuals o narrar una història en la qual el temps es desenvolupa de manera natural. El present individual es connecta amb un present extern o compartit, impulsant a formar part del dit present o a emetre una resposta. El «temps real» es vincula així amb «ser-aquí» o Dasein en la interpretació de Martin Heidegger, que fa referència a la relació entre l’individu i el seu entorn, i indica que tots estem lligats al món en què vivim i en què participem. El concepte també ens porta a qüestionar què és el «temps real», com mesurem el temps i de quina manera aquesta mesura és relativa, tot i que determina la nostra percepció de la realitat.

En el món de l’art, el temps és un element crucial en un fet sovint ignorat: la durada de la contemplació de l’obra d’art per part de l’espectador. Com indica Boris Groys, mentre que en els mitjans tradicionals el temps necessari per a la contemplació és determinat per l’usuari, l’art basat en processos temporals (nous mitjans, vídeo i performance) passa aquest control a l’obra. Habitualment, les obres d’art mostren un moment específic o una acció fitada en el temps, però què succeeix quan una obra es desenvolupa en el «present continu», en constant transformació i subjecta a un procés sense fi?

«Real Time. Art en temps real» presenta una selecció d’obres d’art contemporani en les quals el concepte de «temps real» té un paper principal, ja sigui pel qüestionament de la relativitat del temps, per l’ús de dades extretes en temps real d’Internet o per la seva intenció de crear una visió actual, «realista» i sempre canviant del temps en què vivim. Algunes de les obres seleccionades es nodreixen de la informació que apareix constantment en els mitjans de comunicació, mentre que altres extreuen dades de diverses fonts, estableixen un procés de producció en temps real o bé proposen un qüestionament de la nostra manera de mesurar el temps i de relacionar-nos amb el present. Les tecnologies que emprem actualment en la nostra vida quotidiana tenen un paper principal en aquestes peces, la qual cosa porta les reflexions sobre el temps a un àmbit molt proper a l’espectador, que en alguns casos pot interactuar amb l’obra i en uns altres ho fa sense saber-ho.

http://artssantamonica.gencat.cat/en/detall/Real-Time.-Art-en-temps-real

FULL EXHIBITION CATALOGUE PDF

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