Berlin Art Prize 2016

Berlin Art Prize, photo Anastasia Muna

The Berlin Art Prize is pleased to announce the list of nominated artists for the Berlin Art Prize 2016. Chosen from a pool of over 600 Berlin-based applicants through a multi-stage selection process, the nine nominees selected by the jury are:

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Martin John Callanan
Regina de Miguel
Stine Marie Jacobsen
Lindsay Lawson
Lotte Meret
Benedikt Partenheimer
Aurora Sander
Raul Walch
Lauryn Youden

Of the nine nominated artists selected by the jury (Karen Archey, Kito Nedo, Emeka Ogboh, Ahmet Öğüt and Susanne Winterling) and presented in the exhibition and catalog, three will be selected as winners of the Berlin Art Prize. The three winning artists will be awarded a trophy created for the occasion by Berlin-based artist Tomás Saraceno, prize money and a four-week residency in Georgia.

The exhibition will present a broad spectrum of artistic positions – including sculpture, installation, photography, performance and conceptual art. In contrast to previous years, the exhibition will focus on the nominee’s individual artistic positions, with multiple works from each artist.

The exhibition opening on November 11, 2016 will be followed by a special program of events, performances and lectures during the exhibition. All nine positions will also be documented in a publication which will be released on the occasion of the opening. The winners will be announced live for the first time at the awards ceremony at Kühlhaus Berlin on the evening of December 10, 2016 followed by an after party.

( Opening )
Friday, November 11, 2016, 7pm
After Party starting at 10pm

( Award Ceremony )
Saturday, December 10, 2016
8:30 p.m.
After Party starting at 10pm

( Location )
Kühlhaus Berlin
Luckenwalder Straße 3
10963 Berlin

The exhibition will be open November 12 – December 10, Tuesday through Saturday, 1 – 6pm.

http://berlinartprize.com

Data on View, Nanterre Art Space

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La Terrasse, Nanterre Art Space
exhibition from 7 October to 23 December 2016
Opening on Friday 7 October 6-9 pm

Data on view Curators: Sandrine Moreau and Thierry Fournier

Works by Martin John Callanan, Marie-Pierre Duquoc Hasan Elahi, Oyvind Fahlstrom, Ashley Hunt, Mark Lombardi, Philippe Mairesse, Claire Mairieux, Julien Prévieux, Ward Shelley, Ali Tnani and Lukas Truniger Publications by James Bridle, Bureau d’études, Eli Commins, Albertine Meunier, On Kawara, Jacopo da Pontormo, Erica Scourti

Performance by Magali Desbazeilles

La Terrasse window: work in situ by Thierry Fournier Documentation space created with Benoît Ferchaud, La Revue Créatique and L’Agora, Nanterre Centre for Citizen Projects, Nanterre

Digital network: websites and movies by Mark Boulas, Brian Knappenberger, Laura Poitras, Sandy Smolan, Mareike Wegener, etc.

The exhibition Data on view brings together a selection of works that offer interpretations of public or personal data through drawing or code: graphs, drawings, network installations, sculptures, publications… These works are addressing various stakes, sensitive and poetic but also critical or political. They question in particular what we expect from data, and how these expectations are likely to define our vision of the world. In this way, the exhibition offers a historical perspective, ranging from Oyvind Fahlström or Mark Lombardi to young international artists, some of whose works are being shown here for the first time in France. It is supplemented by film and web site documentations, which deals with the issues of empowerment and the appropriation of data by citizens.

LA TERRASSE : NANTERRE ART SPACE 57 Boulevard Pesaro 92000 Nanterre, France
press contact: Sandrine Moreau, sandrine.moreau@nanterre.fr
www.nanterre.fr

Exhibition invite (FR) [PDF]

Exhibition leaflet (FR) [PDF]

Exhibition press release (EN) [PDF]

Exhibition leaflet (EN) [PDF]

Photos Thierry Fournier 2016

New Materialisms, Institute for Contemporary Art, Zagreb

New Materialisms (Station 3)

Alexei Blinov, Martin Callanan, Vladislav Knežević, Špela Petrič / Miha Turšič, Goran Trbuljak
15 June 2016 – 9 July 2016
Institute for Contemporary Art, Zagreb
curator Darko Fritz

The New Materialisms series of exhibitions aims at reflexive production tackling historically divergent art practices and discursive fields of Concrete and Conceptual Art related to them, as defined in the 1960s (especially through the notions of modernity and postmodernity), but also with understanding of those practices via perspectives of post-media approaches to art and the post-digital condition of contemporary society. In that sense, the project’s intention is to formulate dialogues among important authors of these previous periods and contemporary practitioners who work within a post-media context, mirroring “organic” conditions while assuming the design of aesthetic experience as important mechanism which has its agency in the process of creating the physical world.

New Materialisms explores the German philosopher Max Bense’s identification of the ‘aesthetic condition’, and his proposition that ‘the aesthetic condition is as material as the physical condition of any observed object’. His analysis pursued the goal of ‘programs for the production of aesthetic conditions’, using early computing machines. Materials relating to the infamous clash at a 1970 panel discussion between Bense and Joseph Beuys, which has been described as ‘the visibly spectacular finale to the project of a rational, mathematically oriented aesthetics’, are included in the project.

New Materialisms is a long-term program of exhibitions conceptualized in a collaborative process that has been taking place among grey) (area – space for contemporary and media art from Korčula, Croatia and HICA (Highlands Institute for Contemporary Art) from Scotland.

Artworks

Alexei Blinov: Open Source Vostok, 2013, installation, 3 holograms
Open Source Vostok invites the viewer on a journey back over 400,000 years, through four kilometers of ice, and through almost cosmic cold, to “touch” the untouchable, to feel the real albeit immaterial, and to see an exact optical copy of the ice core and freshly frozen water in the ancient glacial body of water – Lake Vostok. There is not one laboratory in the world that could provide all the conditions found under its icy suit of armor.Open Source Vostok uses this holographic technique to offer the viewer immediate access to one of the least accessible places on Earth, isolated from the surface for more than 15 million years.The artwork in collaboration with Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (St.Petersburg) and Scientific-production holographic laboratory (St. Petersburg).

Text Trends by Martin John Callanan looks at our perception of words and data when displayed in graphical form. Text Trends deals with the spectacularization of information. Using Google data it explores the vast search data of its users. The animation takes the content generated by search queries and reduces this process to its essential elements: search terms vs. frequency searched for over time, presented in the form of a line graph. The viewer watches the animation plot out the ebb and flow of a series of search terms generated over the last four years by internet users around the world. Pairs of words such as ‘now and later’, ‘summer and winter’ play out matter-of-factly, with all the passion of a market index. Instead of the hyper-interactivity of emerging news aggregators and information readers, Text Trends explores our perception of words though topics like time and politics. The work is an investigation into data use, encouraging criticism on
how the data is generated; prompting the question what does the data actually represent?

Installation Voyager/ non-human agent by Špela Petrič and Miha Turšič uses algorithm and data collected from the instruments from the spacecraft Voyager, which since 1977 has been travelling across the universe. Existing space programs focus mainly on understanding the farthest of our surroundings and on developing technological solutions, but tend to overlook the importance of implementing artistic development practices and methodologies in the form of a basic question: What is it like to be a human in space? Voyager/ Non-human Agent project investigates the possible art forms in outer space, a composite of art and science, and the processes of science culturalization.

Goran Trbuljak: Untitled, 2004, Hand counter, pedestal
The total number of persons who have attended the openings of all my individual exhibitions (those who have attended more than one opening have been counted once), 1970 until now

Vladislav Knežević: Binary Pitch 2013, experimental film, 7’, HD
Architecture of the auditorium is a physical, institutional space and the space which generates meaning. The key ideas from Max Bense’s ‘Aesthetics and Programming’ (1968) are coded in zeros and ones and animated as lifting and lowering the seats. In the geometry of a static shot, elements of architecture and space become the subject of a visual experiment. The video consists of three parts: activation (drawing the auditorium out) – coding (central part) – deactivation (drawing the auditorium in).

http://sivazona.hr/exhibitions/new-materialsims-station-3

Works in series, noshow shop launch

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Tuesday 14 June 2016 6:30-8:30 pm

noshowspace is pleased to launch a gallery shop for Works in series, a collection of unique artworks made in series.

Works in series includes paintings, drawings, documents, artefacts and works on paper, often made in preparation of large-scale or site specific works. Derived from studio practice the works capture the thought processes and creative motivations of the artists involved.

Some works follow conceptual series, such as Martin John Callanan’s legal document that certifies his existence or David Cunningham’s use of an algorithm to arrange the alphabet out of sequence. Others are more loosely bound by preoccupations in the studio. Things to think about while looking at the sky by Shaan Syed are pure pigment screen prints which use the screen of the printing process as a palette to blend one pure hue into another. Caline Aoun also builds a colour field, by repeatedly overprinting onto digital transfer film she generates an unexpected painterly process from inky marks, drips, streaks and mis-registrations.

The shop launches with works by Caline Aoun, Matt Calderwood, Martin John Callanan, David Cunningham, Susanna Heron, Alistair McClymont, Rie Nakajima, Giorgio Sadotti, Daniel Sturgis, Shaan Syed and Serra Tansel. All can be viewed at noshow project space by request or online at www.noshowspace.com

As a small-scale arts organisation noshowspace works closely with artists and works are released for sale in order to help fund exhibitions. Sales from the series equally support the project and the artists, with prices ranging between £90 to £2500, discount rates are available on sets. The portfolio will continue to evolve and grow in response to the gallery programme.

http://www.noshowspace.com/exhibitions/works-series

Full PDF

5th Moscow International Biennale for Young Art – Departure of All

5th International Biennale of Young Art Moscow

5th International Biennale of Young Art Moscow

5th International Biennale of Young Art Moscow

87 young artists and art associations, representatives of 36 countries.

According to the curator, the artists’ touch the most important problem of our time – environmental crisis, blurring the boundaries between “nature” and technology, the interaction of transparency and lack of transparency in the information age. We live in an era of discontinuity. If modernism was trying to get to the bottom – zero of painting, the basic structures of human psychology, and historical laws of economics – that today we do not harbor such illusions. Naturally, now that artists find inspiration in the uncertainty, ambiguity, ciphers and conspiracies, talking about instability and multi-dimensional. ”

The main project of 5th Moscow Biennale of Young Art with the theme Deep inside will be shown from July 1 to August 10 Trekhgornij factory building, one of the oldest textile factories in Moscow. Moscow International Biennale for Young Art held since 2008, its founders and organizers – the Ministry of Culture, Department of Culture of Moscow, National Centre for Contemporary Arts and the Moscow Museum of Modern Art.

The participating artists in the main exhibition “Deep Inside” include:

Ozan Atalan, Turkey — USA
Stacy Belevicheva, Ukraine
Matilde Benmayor, Chile
Julius von Bismarck, Germany
Pamela Breda, Italy
Vladislav Brut, Russia / Alisa Beketova, Kazakhstan — Russia
Ekaterina Burlyga, Ukraine — Germany
Olga Butenop, Russia
Martin Callanan, Great Britain
Noor Ali Chagani, Pakistan
Julian Charrière, Switzerland — Germany
Revital Cohen, Israel / Tuur van Balen, Belgium — Great Britain
Juan Covelli, Colombia — Great Britain
Chris Coy, USA
María Dalberg, Iceland
Jasmin Daryani, Iran — Sweden
Petr Davydtchenko, Russia — Sweden — Great Britain
Jonathan Doweck, Israel
Liat Elbling, Israel
Hüseyin Mert Erverdi, Turkey
Karin Ferrari, Italy — Austria
Christian Fogarolli, Italy
Verena Friedrich, Germany
Veronika Geiger, Denmark — Switzerland
Adam Gibney, Ireland
Iuliana Golub, Ukraine
Florian Goldmann, Germany
Katharina Gruzei, Austria
Logi Leó Gunnarsson, Iceland
Ali Jan Haider, Pakistan
Elisabeth Haust, Russia — Czech Republic
Joey Holder, Great Britain
Marguerite Humeau, France — Great Britain
Marc Johnson, France
Graham Kelly, Great Britain — The Netherlands
Daria Khlapova, Russia
Felix Kiessling, Germany
Paul Kneale, Canada
Fabian Knecht, Germany
Darya Koltsova, Ukraine
Lilia Kosyreva, Russia
Egor Kraft, Russia — Great Britain — Austria
Ksenia Kuleva, Russia
Joshua Leary (Evian Christ), Great Britain / David Rudnick, Great Britain — USA
Juliana Cerqueira Leite, USA
Ekaterina Lukoshkova, Russia
Eli Maria Lundgaard, Norway
Vlad Lunin, Ukraine — Canada
Steve Maher, Ireland — Finland
Nadja Verena Marcin, Germany — USA
Maxime Marion, France / Émilie Brout, France
Zoë Claire Miller, USA — Germany
Alice Miceli, Brasil — The Netherlands
Marina Moskalenko, Russia / Tatiana Smirnova, Russia
Lee Nevo, Israel
Alisa Nikolaeva, Russia — France
Ismael Ogando, Dominican Rebulic
Tim Parchikov, Russia
Pau Pahana, USA — Germany
Claire Paugam, France — Iceland
Davide Quayola, Italy
Marina Ragozina, Russia
Martin Reiche, Germany
Rune Rasmussen, Denmark
Farid Rasulov, Azerbaijan
Paul Rosero Contreras, Ecuador
Vesna Rohaček, Croatia — Sweden
Jeremy Santiago-Horseman, USA
Hadas Satt, Israel
Dagmar Schürrer, Austria — Germany
Julia Selin, Sweden
Jura Shust, Belarus — Belgium
Rustan Söderling, Sweden — The Netherlands
Emmy Skensved, Canada — Germany / Grégoire Blunt, Canada — Germany
Joe Sobel, USA — France
Wilf Speller, Great Britain
Yulia Spiridonova, Russia
Arya Sukapura Putra, Indonesia
Natalia Tikhonova, Russia
Alvaro Urbano, Spain — Germany
Ivar Veermäe, Estonia — Germany
Martin Volman, Argentina — Germany
Addie Wagenknecht, USA — Austria
Beny Wagner, Germany — USA
Andrew Norman Wilson, Germany — USA
Helga Wretman, Sweden — Germany

The fifth Moscow Biennale for Young Art, taking place this summer for six weeks only from July 1-August 10, today announced the participants of the main project “Deep Inside,” curated by Berlin-based independent curator Nadim Samman, who co-organised the fourth Marrakech Biennale in 2012. More recently, Samman was also a curator at the TBA-21 Academy, a branch of the Thyssen-Bornemisza Contemporary foundation in Vienna, and oversaw the Antarctic Pavilion at the 14th Venice Architecture Biennale in 2014.

Taking place in the Trekhgornaya Manufaktura, one of Moscow’s oldest textile mills, the main exhibition will feature 87 works by 93 artists, selected from over 2000 applications, under the curatorial focus of tackling recent issues in ecology and economics. The project will also tackle questions regarding the dangers presented by new technologies and social instability.

“Ours is the time of fissures, of prying apart, of penetration and cavities,” Samman said in a statement. “We are climbing, or falling, ever deeper into a kind of black hole. As we do, it is perhaps to be expected that artists should be fascinated by opacities, by occultations, encryptions and conspiracies—the other side of the event horizon. Also, that they should rhapsodize about instability and polydimensionality. Deep Inside is a view from the chasm,” he explained.

The Moscow Biennale for Young Art was first held in 2008, and grew from the combined efforts of the National Centre for Contemporary Arts (NCCA) and the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (MMOMA) to offer a platform for emerging artists. Now in its fifth iteration, the biennale—commissioned by Ekaterina Kibovskaya—continues its mission to draw attention to a new generation of artists representing recent developments in the global art community.

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Press announcement
Artnet News article

Article in ArtForum

You Are Here, Broken Dimanche Press

You Are Here

Winner at the Prix Charlemagne pour la Jeunesse européennee 2010

An investigation into modes of artistic and political production in contemporary Europe, through an investigation of work being produced in the locus of East and West twenty years after the Mauerfall in Berlin. Using Berlin as a prism, a series of texts and artworks by some of Europe’s finest practitioners are presented in a unique book-object that works through its own layout and design as a physical exhibition.

You Are Here

Ann Cotten
Anna Bro
Agnieszka Drotkiewicz
Martin John Callanan
Volha Martynenka
Francesca Musiani
Christophe Van Gerrewey
Urszula Wozniak

Edited by John Holten & Line Madsen Simenstad

Design by FUK laboratories TM
11 November, 2009
English (with Polish, German, Belarussian, Danish)
ISBN 978-3-00-028868-5

Each and Every Command, Baltic39

Each and Every Command

Each and Every Command is a new artwork – twelve years in the making – on show for the first time this week at Baltic39, Newcastle.

Each and Every Command documents, as on ongoing archive, over twelve years of edits I have made in the popular image editing software Adobe Photoshop (from version 8). Presented in readable text, each and every action, edit, change, mistake, or creation that I have made to my own work, and on behalf of other people, on any computer, from 23 December 2003 until today is recorded in unredacted form. Printed as one complete copy over 15,873 pages on mid-grey A4 paper and bound within eleven archive folders, the 27,504,497 million characters comprise 4,114,676 words over 198,605 lines of text. Equivalent to eight times the Complete Works of William Shakespeare.

To celebrate the first exhibition of the archive, the full record is now available in the Amazon Kindle Store, as the largest ebook ever released. For the next five days, the duration of the Baltic 39 exhibition, the ebook will be free to download.

Real Time, Arts Santa Mònica, Barcelona

Real Time
Art en temps real
Exposició, Arts Santa Mònica
28.01 – 10.04.2016

Guillem Bayo, Clara Boj i Diego Díaz, Martin John Callanan, Grégory Chatonsky, Thierry Fournier, Varvara Guljajeva i Mar Canet, Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Nicolas Maigret, Katie Paterson, Antoine Schmitt, Thomson and Craighead, Addie Wagenknecht, Carlo Zanni

FULL EXHIBITION CATALOGUE PDF

real-time

In our society accelerated, time becomes a main concern as we try to keep abreast of major events taking place globally and react to events. We live in a state of permanent connection that leads to anxiety of being part of a present that is not his own, but describing the media and social networks.

The term real time (real time) refers to the ability to display, communicate or react to events when they occur. This term, which is commonly used in computer science, in the media and in all types of stories, denotes a process that occurs synchronously with time the viewer or user. This immediacy means, for example, the ability to interact with a virtual environment, reporting on current events or tell a story that develops over time naturally. This individual is connected with present external or shared driving part of this issue or present an answer. The “real time” is also linked to “be there” or Dasein in the interpretation of Martin Heidegger, which refers to the relationship between the individual and the environment, and indicates that we are all linked to the world we live in and in which we participate. The concept also leads us to question what is “real time” as we measure time and how this measure is relative, but determines our perception of reality.

In the art world, time is a crucial element in a fact often ignored: the length of contemplation of works of art by the viewer. As indicated by Boris Groys, while in traditional media the necessary time for contemplation is determined by the user, process-based temporary art (new media, video and performance) passes this control to work. Usually, the artworks are a special time or action bounded in time, but what happens when a work is developed in the “continuous present” constantly changing and subject to endless process?

“Real Time. Art Real time “presents a selection of contemporary art in which the concept of” real time “has a leading role, either by questioning the relativity of time, using data extracted in real time Internet or their intention to create a vision today, “realistic” and the ever-changing times in which we live. Some of the selected works are fed information that appears on the media, while others extract data from various sources, establish a production process in real time or propose a questioning of the way we measure time and to relate to the present. The technologies we use today in our everyday lives have a major role in these pieces, which brings reflections on time in an area very close to the audience, which in some cases can interact with the work and about others do not know. [Google Translate]

En la nostra societat accelerada, el temps es converteix en una preocupació principal a mesura que intentem mantenir-nos al dia dels grans esdeveniments que tenen lloc a escala global i reaccionar davant dels fets. Vivim en un estat de connexió permanent que ens porta a l’ansietat de formar part d’un present que no és el propi, sinó el que descriuen els mitjans de comunicació i les xarxes socials.

El terme real time (temps real) fa referència a la capacitat de mostrar, comunicar o reaccionar davant dels esdeveniments en el moment en què es produeixen. Aquest terme, que s’utilitza comunament en informàtica, en els mitjans de comunicació i en tot tipus de narracions, denota un procés que es dóna de manera sincronitzada amb el temps de l’espectador o usuari. Aquesta immediatesa es tradueix, per exemple, en la capacitat per interactuar amb un entorn virtual, informar sobre successos actuals o narrar una història en la qual el temps es desenvolupa de manera natural. El present individual es connecta amb un present extern o compartit, impulsant a formar part del dit present o a emetre una resposta. El «temps real» es vincula així amb «ser-aquí» o Dasein en la interpretació de Martin Heidegger, que fa referència a la relació entre l’individu i el seu entorn, i indica que tots estem lligats al món en què vivim i en què participem. El concepte també ens porta a qüestionar què és el «temps real», com mesurem el temps i de quina manera aquesta mesura és relativa, tot i que determina la nostra percepció de la realitat.

En el món de l’art, el temps és un element crucial en un fet sovint ignorat: la durada de la contemplació de l’obra d’art per part de l’espectador. Com indica Boris Groys, mentre que en els mitjans tradicionals el temps necessari per a la contemplació és determinat per l’usuari, l’art basat en processos temporals (nous mitjans, vídeo i performance) passa aquest control a l’obra. Habitualment, les obres d’art mostren un moment específic o una acció fitada en el temps, però què succeeix quan una obra es desenvolupa en el «present continu», en constant transformació i subjecta a un procés sense fi?

«Real Time. Art en temps real» presenta una selecció d’obres d’art contemporani en les quals el concepte de «temps real» té un paper principal, ja sigui pel qüestionament de la relativitat del temps, per l’ús de dades extretes en temps real d’Internet o per la seva intenció de crear una visió actual, «realista» i sempre canviant del temps en què vivim. Algunes de les obres seleccionades es nodreixen de la informació que apareix constantment en els mitjans de comunicació, mentre que altres extreuen dades de diverses fonts, estableixen un procés de producció en temps real o bé proposen un qüestionament de la nostra manera de mesurar el temps i de relacionar-nos amb el present. Les tecnologies que emprem actualment en la nostra vida quotidiana tenen un paper principal en aquestes peces, la qual cosa porta les reflexions sobre el temps a un àmbit molt proper a l’espectador, que en alguns casos pot interactuar amb l’obra i en uns altres ho fa sense saber-ho.

http://artssantamonica.gencat.cat/en/detall/Real-Time.-Art-en-temps-real

FULL EXHIBITION CATALOGUE PDF

Data in the 21st Century, V2 Rotterdam

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Data in the 21st Century explores the friction between the unpredictable reality that we live in and the desire to capture it in data.

19 December 2015 – 14 February 2016
V2_ Institute For The Unstable Media, Eendrachtsstraat 10, 3012 XL, Rotterdam

The capitalist belief that profit-seeking is the best way to manage and develop societies has sparked an unprecedented desire to abstract and quantify everything into data. In the pursuit of economic efficiency, data is money, data is power, data is everything and everything is data. Yet data is contingent on a world that is messy, irrational, unstable, and emotional. The rise of so-called big data and the emergence of technologies that are able to quantify our every move, preference and behaviour, have demonstrated where the friction lies between the unpredictable reality that we live in and the desire to capture it in data. The public program Data in the 21st Century will explore how this friction has changed and shaped our relationship to data and seeks to discuss how this relationship will develop in the future.

Featured Artists
Kyle McDonald
Lev Manovich, Daniel Goddemeyer, Moritz Stefaner & Dominikus Baur
Martin John Callanan
Timo Arnall
Informal Strategies
Lane/You/Debackere
PWR Studio
Max Dovey & Manetta Berends

http://v2.nl/events/data-in-the-21st-century

Discursive Objects, Van Abbe Museum, Eindhoven

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17-25 October 2015, 11h – 18h
Gagelstraat 44, 5616RR, EIndhoven

Aldo Bakker, Maarten Baas, David Bernstein, Martin John Callanan, Chmara Rosinke, Sarah Daher & guests, The Grantchester Pottery, Richard Healy, Anton Hjertstedt, Vincent Knopper, Pieteke Korte, Nynke Koster, Pottery Yacht Club, Corinne Mynatt, n-o-m-a-n, Studio Minale Maeda, Superstudio

The first exhibition for Work at Home situates art, design, and transdisciplinary practices in the home space. In what might be a likely setting for ‘design’, outside of the white cube it presents an alternate context for how we experience contemporary art today. The presentation of ‘art’ and ‘design’ suggests a mutual inclusion of both devices which we use to frame human experience.

Beyond ‘home exhibition’ histories, the structure of the visitor experience is as a lived-in space, and presents potentials of what a contemporary collection of art and design might look like today. Presenting in the home creates a new paradigm that explores the evolving publicisation of our private space.

Press release PDF

http://wah.gallery

I’M Ten exhibition and Paddle8 auction at IMT

4 September – 2 October 2015

Preview: Thursday 3 September 6 – 9pm
Auction launch: Thursday 17 September from 6pm GMT
Auction Ends: Friday 2 October at 9pm
Auction closing party: Friday 2 October 6 – 9pm

I’M Ten is a benefit auction and exhibition of over 150 emerging and established artists, brought together to celebrate IMT Gallery’s 10 year anniversary. All artworks will be auctioned off on Paddle8 at a starting price of £50 from the 17th of September – 2nd October 2015.

We are grateful to our I’M Ten nominators for their thoughtful artist selections. They include: Oreet Ashery (Artist), Stuart Brisley (Artist), Mark Doyle (Independent Art Consultant), Elisabetta Fabrizi (Curator, Tyneside Cinema), Kenneth Goldsmith (Poet and Founding Editor of UbuWeb), Sean Griffiths (Architect and Founder of FAT), Kelly Large (Curator, Zabludowicz Collection), Ana Ventura Miranda (Director, Arte Institute) and Aura Satz (Artist).

Since its opening as a non-profit gallery, IMT Gallery has built a reputation for its innovative site-specific installations as well as its championing of sound art and of artists working across media. The sale of works in I’M Ten, all of which have been kindly donated by participating artists, raises funds to continue to support IMT Gallery’s ambitious public and curatorial programming, as well as towards building new resources for supporting artists.

Follow the exhibition and auction on #IMTen2015

Artists included:
AAS, Larry Achiampong, Rupert Ackroyd, Thorbjørn Andersen, Daniela Antonelli, Sol Archer, Athanasios Argianas, Cristina Ataíde, Alex Baker, Alison Ballard, Darren Banks, Beagles and Ramsay, Felix Bernstein, Antoine Bertin, David Blandy, Aline Bouvy, Uma Breakdown, Nicholas Brooks, Harry Burke, David Burrows, Martin John Callanan, Sarah Carne, Marco Cazzella, Rómulo Celdrán, Adam Chodzko, Rachael Clewlow, Maia Conran, Cecilia Corrigan, John Cussans, Charles Danby, Matthew de Kersaint Giraudeau, Claire Dorsett, Luke Drozd, Graham Dunning, Simon Faithfull, Marcia Farquhar, Brian Fay, Joe Fletcher Orr, Beth Fox, Margarita Gluzberg, Katie Goodwin, Joe Graham, Oona Grimes, Tina Gverovic, Mark Harris, Joey Holder, Rowena Hughes, Helena Hunter, Atsuhide Ito, Mat Jenner, Sophie Jung, Nick Kennedy, Dean Kenning, Lotte Rose Kjær Skau, Kristen Kreider and James O’Leary, Kamil Kuskowski, Jessica Labatte, Dominique Lämmli, Rachel Lancaster, Sophia Le Fraga, Richard Squires, Sasha Litvintseva, Daniel Locke, Kevin Logan, Lynn Lu, Marcin Luczkowski, David Lytzhøft, Sally Madge, Martim Meirelles, Luke McCreadie, Aidan McNeill, Melanie Manchot, Harry Meadley, Lindsey Mendick, Rosa Menkman, Paulina Michnowska, Karen Mirza, Matt Moser-Clark, Harriet Murray, Idit Nathan, Natacha Nisic, Flore Nové-Josserand, Eva O’Leary, Aki Onda, 0rphan Drift, Tom O’Sullivan & Joanne Tatham, Miguel Palma, Maria Papadomanolaki, Mathew Parkin, Flora Parrott, Berry Patten, Isabel Pavão, Laura Pawela, Will Peck, Pil and Galia Kollectiv, Manuela Pimentel, Patricia Pinsker, Plastique Fantastique, Maeve Rendle, Hyun-Min Ryu, Andreas Rasmussen, Richard Rigg, Sam Risley Billingham, Florian Roithmayr, Caroline Rothstein, Giorgio Sadotti, Hannah Sawtell, Henrik Schrat, Erica Scourti, Dallas Seitz, Yinka Shonibare, Gordon Shrigley, Signal To Noise, DJ Simpson, Mark Scott-Wood, Thomas Skov, Amalie Smith, John Smith, Rob Smith, Evangelia Spiliopoulou, Marilia Stagkouraki, David Steans, Eva Stenam, Helen Stratford, NaoKo TakaHashi, Dafna Talmor, Vibeke Tandberg, Neil Taylor, Jennet Thomas, Thomson & Craigshead, John Timberlake, Emma Tod, Townley and Bradby, Suzanne Treister, Lorenzo Triburgo, Alexandra Urban, Pedro Valdez Cardoso, Markus Von Platen, Shen Xin, Tom White, Elizabeth Wright, Mark Peter Wright, Judith Zaugg, Eli Zafran, O Zhang

More info online

I Cannot Not Communicate at Vitsœ New York

I Cannot Not Communicate, Martin John Callanan at Vitsœ New York: 14–19 May
33 Bond Street
New York NY 10012
T 1 917 675 6990
newyork@vitsoe.com

At Vitsœ we like to share the work of creative people. So when Berlin and UK-based artist (and Vitsœ customer), Martin John Callanan, asked to show a new piece for the first time at our New York shop, we were happy to oblige.

I Cannot Not Communicate, consists of the top 100 books recommended to Callanan by Amazon, based on everything he read and bought since the online retail giant first launched its recommendation algorithm over 15 years ago.

The books are displayed on our trusted shelves, with chairs and tables to ensure your time interacting with the artwork is a comfortable one.

The event will take place during a busy time with New York design week and Frieze Art Fair New York occupying the city – all the more reason to take a moment to pause in comfort at our New York shop at 33 Bond Street.

To accompany the installation, Callanan has produced a pamphlet, including a text by Marialaura Ghidini. A limited number of copies are available free to visitors.

Martin John Callanan is an artist researching an individual’s place within systems. Recent solo exhibitions include Noshowspace, London, Horrach Moya, Palma and Or Gallery, Berlin. His work has been shown at White Cube, James Cohan Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Whitstable Biennale and Imperial War Museum. He is recipient of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Visual Art.

Screen Shot 2015-04-23 at 23.36.19

 

 

Die Zusammenarbeit mit kreativen Köpfen macht uns immer wieder Freude. Als uns der in Berlin und Großbritannien lebende Künstler (und Vitsœ Kunde) Martin John Callanan fragte, ob er seine neue Arbeit in unserem New Yorker Shop ausstellen könne, sagten wir ohne Zögern zu.

„I Cannot Not Communicate“ besteht aus den ersten 100 Büchern, die Callanan von Amazon vorgeschlagen wurden – basierend auf allem, was er gekauft und gelesen hatte, seit der Onlineshop-Gigant vor mehr als 15 Jahren seinen Algorithmus für Kaufempfehlungen einführte.

Ausgestellt werden die Bücher in unseren bewährten Regalen. Unsere Sessel und Tische sorgen dafür, dass es beim Kunstgenuss nicht an Komfort mangelt.

Die Ausstellung findet während der trubeligen Zeit der New York Design Week und der Kunstmesse Frieze statt – gönnen Sie sich eine kleine Auszeit von der Geschäftigkeit in unserem New Yorker Shop in der Bond Street 33.

Begleitend zur Ausstellung hat Callanan im Riso-Druckverfahren ein Pamphlet produziert, unter anderem mit einem Text von Marialaura Ghidini. Eine limitierte Auflage können geneigte Besucher kostenlos mitnehmen.

Martin John Callanan sucht nach individuellen Wegen im Kunstbetrieb. Seine jüngsten Solo-Ausstellungen fanden im Noshowspace, London, Horrach Moya, Palma und der Or Gallery, Berlin statt. Seine Werke wurden gezeigt von Institutionen wie White Cube, James Cohan Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Whitstable Biennale und dem Imperial War Museum. Er ist ausgezeichnet worden mit dem Philip Leverhulme Prize für Bildende Kunst.

Video DOC at Media Art Futures, Departure of All and Text Trends

Video DOC cinema programme at Media Art Futures, Murcia, 15-30 April 2015 features both Text Trends and documentary video of Departure of All.

In his book “The Imaginary Museum” (1965), André Malraux asserted that in the reproductions of artworks published in books and exhibition catalogues we can find more significant artworks that could be seen in the largest museum of the world. Internet has exponentially expanded Malraux’s Imaginary Museum and provided us with unprecedented access to a myriad of artworks. In digital art, the complexity or ephemerality of many artworks makes it difficult to see them in an exhibition and therefore it is the video documentation created by the artists themselves that allows us to discover their works. Two selections of documentation videos present an overview of the many faces of digital art today.

Abelardo Gil-Fournier
Alessandro Ludovico
Aram Bartholl
Aymeric Mansoux
Carlo Zanni
Chris Sugrue
Christa Sommerer
Clara Boj y Diego Díaz
Dave Griffiths
Evan Roth
F.A.T. Lab
Gordan Savicic
James Powderly
Laurent Mignonneau
Mar Canet
Marco Cadioli
Marloes de Valk
Martin John Callanan
Martina Höfflin
moddr_
Moisés Mañas
Paolo Cirio
Pascal Glissmann
Radamés Ajna
Sander Veenhof
Tempt1
Theo Watson
Thiago Hersan
Thierry Fournier
Tilman Reiff
Varvara Guljajeva
Volker Morawe
VR Urban
Zach Lieberman

Curated by Pau Waelder

See the whole film programme or the whole Festival programme or PDF

How to Construct a Time Machine – This is Tomorrow

How to Construct a Time Machine

How to Construct a Time Machine
MK Gallery Milton Keynes
23 January-22 March 2015
Review by Edwina Attlee

In his essay on the history of photography Walter Benjamin charges patent-law problems and a coincidence of industrious inventors as the cause for the accelerated development and misty history of the medium. Conditions were created ‘that for a long time ruled out any kind of looking back.’ (1) The irony is that photography created the conditions for a backwards-look, an arrest and exposure of the momentary that made looking back, both pastime and pleasure. What was it now possible to look back at? Nothing more than the optical unconscious. This was Benjamin’s term for the hitherto unseen, the blown up, the magnified, the halted and the reversed. After photography people could see, for the first time, ‘their posture in the split second of their stepping out’. It is its revelation of the split second that makes the camera a time machine. Obsession with the split second is not a new phenomenon as the 26 works on show here, spanning 1896 – 2014, make clear. Film, video and still-image animation make up the largest proportion of an exhibition that includes drawings, sculpture, musical scores and recordings. From the grainy magic of Georges Méliès and Louis Lumière to Teching Hsieh’s 8,627 single film frames depicting a year of clock-punching, the screen-based medium seems to be the one that is turned to and returned to for attention to the timely.

The show’s curator, Maquard Smith, set himself this question, ‘what is particular – historically, conceptually, aesthetically – to the recent temporal turn in contemporary art?’ He writes that each work ‘makes it possible to play around with, to transform and reinvent the ordering of the past, the present and the future’. What the works do side-by-side is in fact to reveal the opposite, they might desire to subvert and escape time but not a single one does. The medium of photography and film is satisfying because it can be manipulated; it permits the fantasy of slowing down, speeding up and holding still.

The art historian Carol Mavor has described her essay on nostology (the study of aging) as ‘an embarrassment of helplessness’. This exhibition reveals the construction of time machines to be a similar endeavor. The machines betray a discomforting obsession. Their makers are desperate, compulsive, and I suspect, always to be frustrated. On Kawara’s date paintings are only a more legible version of the lines scored into prison walls, made by a captive so as not to forget. But not to forget what? Are dates so important? Are times? As Martin John Callanan’s ‘real time’ departure board, for all the planes in the world, scrolls through an improbable spew of lift offs from Ho Chi Minh City, from Bradford, from Tibilisi, the effect is nonsensical. These events (flight, waking, falling asleep) are both countable and uncountable, or, counting them does not add up to an amount that contains or stands for what is ‘real’. An attention to time does not hold it still, nor does it empty it of its contents.

Which is not to say that this is a pessimistic exhibition. Although redolent of Samuel Beckett’s gallows humour, a lot of the works are extremely funny. After all, a good joke is all in the timing. Thomson & Craighead’s ‘The Time Machine in Alphabetical Order’ calls out ‘machine, machine, machine, man, man, man, Morlocks!’ A number of the pieces give glimpses of a technological unconsciousness, the unbidden pictures and patterns that emerge from automatic systems of ordering. Manfred Mohr’s programmed expressionism uses algorithms to make art. The humour of these pieces works side-by-side with the discomforting sensation of the inanimate made animate.

It is always funny (and tragic) to think about what is happening at the same time as something else. Upstairs from the exhibition, in an empty Video Room, I watch John Cage and Merce Cunningham dance and make sounds on the same stage. Purposely near to one another but conscientiously dislocated they try to make their work without influence from the other. Cage describes it as ‘two things going on at the same time, which is characteristic of life’. It is the ‘at the same time’ which is the most contemporary of concerns for the time machines whirring in the gallery below. Current technologies make simultaneity visible, splitting seconds and distributing their image. The desperate work of the self-consciously timed machines continues – and the clocks still work.

(1) Walter Benjamin, ‘Brief History of Photography’, One-way Street and Other Writings (London: Penguin, 2009) p.172

This is Tomorrow

Mapping Spaces book edited by Ulrike Gehring

Mapping Spaces

This large survey book builds on the ZKM Karlsruhe exhibition tracing the multifaceted relationship between art, science and technology in Dutch landscape art around 1650. Long before digital satellite imagery, Dutch artists used modern systems of remote sensing. Their art works provide valuable insights into past exchanges of knowledge that anticipate the techniques of mapping used today.

Includes A Planetary Order.

Hardcover: 500 pages
Publisher: Hirmer (1 Dec. 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-13: 978-3777422305
Dimensions: 25.5 x 3.8 x 29.4 cm

44th International Film Festival Rotterdam

The 44th International Film Festival Rotterdam will take place 21 January – 1 February 2015, and include Departure of All and Text Trends in the Signals: 24/7 programme.

24/7 will focus on the changing world & technology, and how the attention economy is affecting our lives, how we consume information and how it dominates not only our waking but also our sleeping moments. Our experience of time is mutating at the speed of light, due to the glass fibre and wireless networks that keep us entangled. How this affects our sense of reality now and its impact in the near future is one of the most important discussions in the world today.

In the late 1990s, when Google was barely one year old and was still a privately held company, its future CEO, Dr. Eric Schmidt was already articulating the context in which such a venture would flourish. Schmidt declared that the twenty-first century would be synonymous with what he called the ‘attention economy’, and that the dominant global corporations would be those that succeed in maximizing the number of ‘eyeballs’ they could consistently engage and control.

24/7 is focussed on stimulating discussion on this ‘attention economy’, the global thirst for information and the daily data consumption and mass synchronisation of work and leisure rhythms which are synonymous with this. We are working, communicating and consuming whenever and wherever we happen to be in the world. Divisions between night and day, between rest and work are gradually disappearing. Our experience of time is mutating at the speed of light, due to the glass fibre and wireless networks that keep us entangled.

Therefore 24/7 forces the audience to step out of the cinema, into hotels. A hotel is just like a cinema, a place where one checks in to step out of the daily routine. They are open 24/7 and strongly associated with our need for sleep. While examining the ever-changing world of the 21st Century, this programme challenges the traditional notion of a film ‘slot’ by raising the question of what we now class as a ‘normal duration’.

Films in Signals 24/7
Departure of All at IFFR
Text Trends at IFFR
Signals: 24/7 programme PDF

Made possible with support from the British Council Travel Grant Fund

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