I Cannot Not Communicate at Vitsœ New York

I Cannot Not Communicate, Martin John Callanan at Vitsœ New York: 14–19 May
33 Bond Street
New York NY 10012
T 1 917 675 6990
newyork@vitsoe.com

At Vitsœ we like to share the work of creative people. So when Berlin and UK-based artist (and Vitsœ customer), Martin John Callanan, asked to show a new piece for the first time at our New York shop, we were happy to oblige.

I Cannot Not Communicate, consists of the top 100 books recommended to Callanan by Amazon, based on everything he read and bought since the online retail giant first launched its recommendation algorithm over 15 years ago.

The books are displayed on our trusted shelves, with chairs and tables to ensure your time interacting with the artwork is a comfortable one.

The event will take place during a busy time with New York design week and Frieze Art Fair New York occupying the city – all the more reason to take a moment to pause in comfort at our New York shop at 33 Bond Street.

To accompany the installation, Callanan has produced a pamphlet, including a text by Marialaura Ghidini. A limited number of copies are available free to visitors.

Martin John Callanan is an artist researching an individual’s place within systems. Recent solo exhibitions include Noshowspace, London, Horrach Moya, Palma and Or Gallery, Berlin. His work has been shown at White Cube, James Cohan Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Whitstable Biennale and Imperial War Museum. He is recipient of the Philip Leverhulme Prize in Visual Art.

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Die Zusammenarbeit mit kreativen Köpfen macht uns immer wieder Freude. Als uns der in Berlin und Großbritannien lebende Künstler (und Vitsœ Kunde) Martin John Callanan fragte, ob er seine neue Arbeit in unserem New Yorker Shop ausstellen könne, sagten wir ohne Zögern zu.

„I Cannot Not Communicate“ besteht aus den ersten 100 Büchern, die Callanan von Amazon vorgeschlagen wurden – basierend auf allem, was er gekauft und gelesen hatte, seit der Onlineshop-Gigant vor mehr als 15 Jahren seinen Algorithmus für Kaufempfehlungen einführte.

Ausgestellt werden die Bücher in unseren bewährten Regalen. Unsere Sessel und Tische sorgen dafür, dass es beim Kunstgenuss nicht an Komfort mangelt.

Die Ausstellung findet während der trubeligen Zeit der New York Design Week und der Kunstmesse Frieze statt – gönnen Sie sich eine kleine Auszeit von der Geschäftigkeit in unserem New Yorker Shop in der Bond Street 33.

Begleitend zur Ausstellung hat Callanan im Riso-Druckverfahren ein Pamphlet produziert, unter anderem mit einem Text von Marialaura Ghidini. Eine limitierte Auflage können geneigte Besucher kostenlos mitnehmen.

Martin John Callanan sucht nach individuellen Wegen im Kunstbetrieb. Seine jüngsten Solo-Ausstellungen fanden im Noshowspace, London, Horrach Moya, Palma und der Or Gallery, Berlin statt. Seine Werke wurden gezeigt von Institutionen wie White Cube, James Cohan Gallery, Whitechapel Gallery, International Film Festival Rotterdam, Whitstable Biennale und dem Imperial War Museum. Er ist ausgezeichnet worden mit dem Philip Leverhulme Prize für Bildende Kunst.

Video DOC at Media Art Futures, Departure of All and Text Trends

Video DOC cinema programme at Media Art Futures, Murcia, 15-30 April 2015 features both Text Trends and documentary video of Departure of All.

In his book “The Imaginary Museum” (1965), André Malraux asserted that in the reproductions of artworks published in books and exhibition catalogues we can find more significant artworks that could be seen in the largest museum of the world. Internet has exponentially expanded Malraux’s Imaginary Museum and provided us with unprecedented access to a myriad of artworks. In digital art, the complexity or ephemerality of many artworks makes it difficult to see them in an exhibition and therefore it is the video documentation created by the artists themselves that allows us to discover their works. Two selections of documentation videos present an overview of the many faces of digital art today.

Abelardo Gil-Fournier
Alessandro Ludovico
Aram Bartholl
Aymeric Mansoux
Carlo Zanni
Chris Sugrue
Christa Sommerer
Clara Boj y Diego Díaz
Dave Griffiths
Evan Roth
F.A.T. Lab
Gordan Savicic
James Powderly
Laurent Mignonneau
Mar Canet
Marco Cadioli
Marloes de Valk
Martin John Callanan
Martina Höfflin
moddr_
Moisés Mañas
Paolo Cirio
Pascal Glissmann
Radamés Ajna
Sander Veenhof
Tempt1
Theo Watson
Thiago Hersan
Thierry Fournier
Tilman Reiff
Varvara Guljajeva
Volker Morawe
VR Urban
Zach Lieberman

Curated by Pau Waelder

See the whole film programme or the whole Festival programme or PDF

How to Construct a Time Machine – This is Tomorrow

How to Construct a Time Machine

How to Construct a Time Machine
MK Gallery Milton Keynes
23 January-22 March 2015
Review by Edwina Attlee

In his essay on the history of photography Walter Benjamin charges patent-law problems and a coincidence of industrious inventors as the cause for the accelerated development and misty history of the medium. Conditions were created ‘that for a long time ruled out any kind of looking back.’ (1) The irony is that photography created the conditions for a backwards-look, an arrest and exposure of the momentary that made looking back, both pastime and pleasure. What was it now possible to look back at? Nothing more than the optical unconscious. This was Benjamin’s term for the hitherto unseen, the blown up, the magnified, the halted and the reversed. After photography people could see, for the first time, ‘their posture in the split second of their stepping out’. It is its revelation of the split second that makes the camera a time machine. Obsession with the split second is not a new phenomenon as the 26 works on show here, spanning 1896 – 2014, make clear. Film, video and still-image animation make up the largest proportion of an exhibition that includes drawings, sculpture, musical scores and recordings. From the grainy magic of Georges Méliès and Louis Lumière to Teching Hsieh’s 8,627 single film frames depicting a year of clock-punching, the screen-based medium seems to be the one that is turned to and returned to for attention to the timely.

The show’s curator, Maquard Smith, set himself this question, ‘what is particular – historically, conceptually, aesthetically – to the recent temporal turn in contemporary art?’ He writes that each work ‘makes it possible to play around with, to transform and reinvent the ordering of the past, the present and the future’. What the works do side-by-side is in fact to reveal the opposite, they might desire to subvert and escape time but not a single one does. The medium of photography and film is satisfying because it can be manipulated; it permits the fantasy of slowing down, speeding up and holding still.

The art historian Carol Mavor has described her essay on nostology (the study of aging) as ‘an embarrassment of helplessness’. This exhibition reveals the construction of time machines to be a similar endeavor. The machines betray a discomforting obsession. Their makers are desperate, compulsive, and I suspect, always to be frustrated. On Kawara’s date paintings are only a more legible version of the lines scored into prison walls, made by a captive so as not to forget. But not to forget what? Are dates so important? Are times? As Martin John Callanan’s ‘real time’ departure board, for all the planes in the world, scrolls through an improbable spew of lift offs from Ho Chi Minh City, from Bradford, from Tibilisi, the effect is nonsensical. These events (flight, waking, falling asleep) are both countable and uncountable, or, counting them does not add up to an amount that contains or stands for what is ‘real’. An attention to time does not hold it still, nor does it empty it of its contents.

Which is not to say that this is a pessimistic exhibition. Although redolent of Samuel Beckett’s gallows humour, a lot of the works are extremely funny. After all, a good joke is all in the timing. Thomson & Craighead’s ‘The Time Machine in Alphabetical Order’ calls out ‘machine, machine, machine, man, man, man, Morlocks!’ A number of the pieces give glimpses of a technological unconsciousness, the unbidden pictures and patterns that emerge from automatic systems of ordering. Manfred Mohr’s programmed expressionism uses algorithms to make art. The humour of these pieces works side-by-side with the discomforting sensation of the inanimate made animate.

It is always funny (and tragic) to think about what is happening at the same time as something else. Upstairs from the exhibition, in an empty Video Room, I watch John Cage and Merce Cunningham dance and make sounds on the same stage. Purposely near to one another but conscientiously dislocated they try to make their work without influence from the other. Cage describes it as ‘two things going on at the same time, which is characteristic of life’. It is the ‘at the same time’ which is the most contemporary of concerns for the time machines whirring in the gallery below. Current technologies make simultaneity visible, splitting seconds and distributing their image. The desperate work of the self-consciously timed machines continues – and the clocks still work.

(1) Walter Benjamin, ‘Brief History of Photography’, One-way Street and Other Writings (London: Penguin, 2009) p.172

This is Tomorrow

Mapping Spaces book edited by Ulrike Gehring

Mapping Spaces

This large survey book builds on the ZKM Karlsruhe exhibition tracing the multifaceted relationship between art, science and technology in Dutch landscape art around 1650. Long before digital satellite imagery, Dutch artists used modern systems of remote sensing. Their art works provide valuable insights into past exchanges of knowledge that anticipate the techniques of mapping used today.

Includes A Planetary Order.

Hardcover: 500 pages
Publisher: Hirmer (1 Dec. 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-13: 978-3777422305
Dimensions: 25.5 x 3.8 x 29.4 cm

44th International Film Festival Rotterdam

The 44th International Film Festival Rotterdam will take place 21 January – 1 February 2015, and include Departure of All and Text Trends in the Signals: 24/7 programme.

24/7 will focus on the changing world & technology, and how the attention economy is affecting our lives, how we consume information and how it dominates not only our waking but also our sleeping moments. Our experience of time is mutating at the speed of light, due to the glass fibre and wireless networks that keep us entangled. How this affects our sense of reality now and its impact in the near future is one of the most important discussions in the world today.

In the late 1990s, when Google was barely one year old and was still a privately held company, its future CEO, Dr. Eric Schmidt was already articulating the context in which such a venture would flourish. Schmidt declared that the twenty-first century would be synonymous with what he called the ‘attention economy’, and that the dominant global corporations would be those that succeed in maximizing the number of ‘eyeballs’ they could consistently engage and control.

24/7 is focussed on stimulating discussion on this ‘attention economy’, the global thirst for information and the daily data consumption and mass synchronisation of work and leisure rhythms which are synonymous with this. We are working, communicating and consuming whenever and wherever we happen to be in the world. Divisions between night and day, between rest and work are gradually disappearing. Our experience of time is mutating at the speed of light, due to the glass fibre and wireless networks that keep us entangled.

Therefore 24/7 forces the audience to step out of the cinema, into hotels. A hotel is just like a cinema, a place where one checks in to step out of the daily routine. They are open 24/7 and strongly associated with our need for sleep. While examining the ever-changing world of the 21st Century, this programme challenges the traditional notion of a film ‘slot’ by raising the question of what we now class as a ‘normal duration’.

Films in Signals 24/7
Departure of All at IFFR
Text Trends at IFFR
Signals: 24/7 programme PDF

Made possible with support from the British Council Travel Grant Fund

The Routledge Companion to Remix Studies

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The Routledge Companion to Remix Studies
Chapter 31, Of Re/appropriations, Gustavo Romano

Hardcover: 556 pages
Publisher: Routledge (26 Jan 2015)
Language: English
ISBN-13: 978-0415716253
Product Dimensions: 22.9 x 17.5 x 3.6 cm

How to Construct a Time Machine, MK Gallery, Milton Keynes – Departure of All

		How to Construct a Time Machine, MK Gallery, Milton Keynes

23 January – 22 March 2015

Preview 22 January 2015 / 6-10pm

MK Gallery, 900 Midsummer Boulevard, Central Milton Keynes, MK9 3QA.
Admission is free

www.mkgallery.org

January 2015 MK Gallery presents How to Construct a Time Machine (23 January – 22 March 2015), an exhibition of over twenty-five historical and contemporary works that explore how artists play with media in innovative ways to transform our experience of time.

What is time? How do we order the past, the present, and the future? Why are artists interested in time? How is art a machine, vehicle, or device for exploring time? How is art a means by which time ‘travels’, and how does art permit us to travel in time? Consideration of these and other questions has provided the exhibition rationale for guest curator, Dr Marquard Smith, Head of Doctoral Studies/Research Leader in the School of Humanities at the Royal College of Art, London.

The show’s title is taken from an 1899 text by the avant-garde French writer, Alfred Jarry, written in direct response to H. G. Wells’ science fiction novel The Time Machine (1895). Wells invented and popularised a distinctively modern, fictional concept of time travel, with the time machine as a vehicle that could be operated ‘selectively’.Jarry’s response crafted a pseudo-scientific fiction that presents the time machine and time travel as an instance of ‘the science of imaginary solutions’.

Taking this idea of the time machine, time travel, and perhaps even time itself as an instance of ‘the science of imaginary solutions’, the exhibition is divided thematically across the galleries and includes works by John Cage, Martin John Callanan, Jim Campbell, Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher, Matt Collishaw, Ruth Ewan, Tehching Hsieh, the Lumière Brothers, Chris Marker, Kris Martin, Manfred Mohr, Melvin Moti, Nam June Paik, Katie Paterson, Elizabeth Price, The Otolith Group, Raqs Media Collective, Meekyoung Shin, Sun Ra, Thompson & Craighead, Mark Wallinger and Catherine Yass, amongst others.

Film work ranges from George Méliès’ A Trip to the Moon (1902), an iconic silent movie which follows a group of astronomers as they explore the moon, to Thomson & Craighead’s The Time Machine in alphabetical order (2010), a complete rendition of the 1960s film version of the Wells’ novella re-edited into alphabetical order.

Sculptural work includes Mark Wallinger’s Time and Relative Dimensions in Space (2001), an aluminium version of Dr Who’s ‘Tardis’ police box that simultaneously disappears into the space-time continuum and reflects its own surroundings, and Ruth Ewan’s We Could Have Been Anything That We Wanted to Be (2012), a decimal clock which divides the day into ten (rather than twenty-four) periods, echoing a bold 18th century French Republican attempt to redefine and rationalise the day.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue, designed by Herman Lelie, featuring an extended Introduction by the exhibition’s curator and a translation of Jarry’s How to Construct a Time Machine, together with essays by Dutch cultural theorist and video artist Mieke Bal and radical philosopher Peter Osborne. The exhibition will be supported by a range of related events including tours by the curator and artists, seminars, academic conferences, and film screenings.

MK Gallery exhibition page
List of works (PDF)
Installation images
Download PDF News Release
Download PDF invite

www.mkgallery.org

Visualization in the Age of Computerization (Routledge Studies in Science, Technology and Society)

Objectivity and Representative Practices chapter
Dr Chiara Ambrosio, UCL Department of Science and Technology Studies

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Digitalization and computerization are now pervasive in science. This has deep consequences for our understanding of scientific knowledge and of the scientific process, and challenges longstanding assumptions and traditional frameworks of thinking of scientific knowledge. Digital media and computational processes challenge our conception of the way in which perception and cognition work in science, of the objectivity of science, and the nature of scientific objects. They bring about new relationships between science, art and other visual media, and new ways of practicing science and organizing scientific work, especially as new visual media are being adopted by science studies scholars in their own practice. This volume reflects on how scientists use images in the computerization age, and how digital technologies are affecting the study of science.

Hardcover: 292 pages
Publisher: Routledge (22 Oct 2014)
ISBN-13: 978-0415814454

ממריאים גבוה

martin-john-CALLANAN_p-500x815

“Departure of All”, 2013, מסך LCD, מחשב ותוכנת מחשב,91.4×49.9×40 ס”מ

באדיבות האמן וגלריה James Cohan, ניו יורק/שנגחאי

האמן הבריטי הקונספטואליMartin John Callanan מושפע בעבודותיו ממערכות חברתיות ושלטוניות המעצבות את חיינו וחוקר את מקומו של הפרט בתוך המערכות האלה. לא אחת הוא מפנה בקשות מידע לשלטונות או לתאגידי ענק בינלאומיים, ואוסף הנתונים הרחב שהוא מפיק במחקריו משמש כבסיס לעבודותיו וכמראה המשקפת את העולם הרחב. בעבודה “Departure of All” (כל הטיסות היוצאות) נראה לוח טיסות המציג מידע חי על כל טיסה שממריאה מכל נמל תעופה בינלאומי בעולם בזמן תצוגתה של העבודה. המידע מתחלף על הלוח במהירות גבוהה, וההמתנה המוכרת מול לוח הטיסות בשדה התעופה מתחלפת בזרם מואץ ומסחרר של נתוני טיסות, המקבל תוקף מעצם הידיעה כי מדובר בטיסות אמיתיות הטסות ליעדים אמיתיים בזמן אמת. “בעבודה זו אני מתעניין במה שאינפורמציה זו מייצגת”, אומר האמן, “58 טיסות בכל דקה מייצגות כ־400,000 אנשים הממריאים לאוויר בחלקים שונים של העולם והוצאה של מאות מיליוני דולרים מדי רגע”. המידע, המופרד ממיקומו הטבעי על קיר שדה התעופה ומתחלף בקצב מסחרר, מייצר בעבודה סתירה פנימית, ומעורר שאלות על משמעותו. הצגת העבודה – שנראית כלוח טיסות לכל דבר – בתוך חלל של גלריה – שאף הוא בדומה לחלל שדה התעופה מתפקד כמרחב ניטרלי, זירה זמנית ומקום מעבר – עוטפת את העבודה בקשר הולם, טוענת אותה במשנה תוקף ומזמינה מחשבה על ההשפעה הפסיכולוגית של החוקיות והנהלים במקומות כאלה על המבקרים בהם.

http://atmag.co.il/

New Directions in the Philosophy of Science (The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective)

The Future of Objectivity
Dr Chiara Ambrosio, UCL Department of Science and Technology Studies

New Directions in the Philosophy of Science (The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective)

New Directions in the Philosophy of Science (The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective)

New Directions in the Philosophy of Science (The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective)

New Directions in the Philosophy of Science (The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective)

New Directions in the Philosophy of Science (The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective)

New Directions in the Philosophy of Science (The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective)

This volume sheds light on still unexplored issues and raises new questions in the main areas addressed by the philosophy of science. Bringing together selected papers from three main events, the book presents the most advanced scientific results in the field and suggests innovative lines for further investigation. It explores how discussions on several notions of the philosophy of science can help different scientific disciplines in learning from each other. Finally, it focuses on the relationship between Cambridge and Vienna in twentieth century philosophy of science. The areas examined in the book are: formal methods, the philosophy of the natural and life sciences, the cultural and social sciences, the physical sciences and the history of the philosophy of science.

Hardcover: 788 pages
Publisher: Springer; 2014 edition (20 Jun 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 3319043811
ISBN-13: 978-3319043814
Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 15.5 x 4.8 cm

Ecocinema Theory and Practice, Sean Cubitt

Ecocinema Theory and Practice

Ecocinema Theory and Practice

Ecocinema Theory and Practice

Ecocinema Theory and Practice

Ecocinema Theory and Practice is the first collection of its kind—an anthology that offers a comprehensive introduction to the rapidly growing field of eco-film criticism, a branch of critical scholarship that investigates cinema’s intersections with environmental understandings. It references seminal readings through cutting edge research and is designed as an introduction to the field as well as a sourcebook. It defines ecocinema studies, sketches its development over the past twenty years, provides theoretical frameworks for moving forward, and presents eloquent examples of the practice of eco-film criticism through essays written by the field’s leading and emerging scholars. From explicitly environmental films such as Werner Herzong’s Grizzly Man and Roland Emmerich’s The Day After Tomorrow to less obvious examples like Errol Morris’s Fast, Cheap & Out of Control and Christopher Nolan’s Inception, the pieces in this collection comprehensively interrogate the breadth of ecocinema. Ecocinema Theory and Practice also directs readers to further study through lists of recommended readings, professional organizations, and relevant periodicals.

Stephen Rust (Editor), Salma Monani (Editor), Sean Cubitt (Editor)
Hardcover: 344 pages
Publisher: Routledge (27 Sep 2012)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0415899427
ISBN-13: 978-0415899420
Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 24.1 cm

Image Politics of Climate Change: Visualizations, Imaginations, Documentations, Birgit Schneider, Thomas Nocke

Image Politics of Climate Change: Visualizations, Imaginations, Documentations [Paperback] Birgit Schneider (Editor), Thomas Nocke (Editor)

Image Politics of Climate Change: Visualizations, Imaginations, Documentations [Paperback] Birgit Schneider (Editor), Thomas Nocke (Editor)

Image Politics of Climate Change: Visualizations, Imaginations, Documentations [Paperback] Birgit Schneider (Editor), Thomas Nocke (Editor)

Scientific research on climate change has given rise to a variety of images picturing climate change. These range from colorful expert graphics, model visualizations, photographs of extreme weather events like floods, droughts or melting ice, symbols like polar bears, to animated and interactive visualizations. Climate change graphics have not only increased knowledge about the subject, they have begun to influence popular awareness of global weather events. The status of climate pictures today is particularly crucial, as global climate change as a long-term process cannot be seen. When images are widely distributed, they are able to shape how the world is thought about and seen. It is this implicit basic assumption of the power of images to influence reality that this book addresses: today’s images might become the blueprint for tomorrow’s realities. “Image Politics of Climate Change” combines a wide interdisciplinary range of perspectives and questions, treated here in sixteen interdisciplinary case studies. The author’s specializations include both visual practice and theory: in the fields of climate sciences, computer graphics, art, curating, art history and visual studies, communication and cultural science, environmental and science & technology studies. The close interlinking of these viewpoints promotes in-depth insights into issues of production and analysis of climate visualization.

Birgit Schneider (Editor), Thomas Nocke (Editor)
Paperback: 388 pages
Publisher: Transcript Verlag (15 Mar 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 3837626105
ISBN-13: 978-3837626100
Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 14.8 x 2.8 cm

The New Yorker, The Fifth Season, James Cohan Gallery

The New Yorker

To sum up the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change: we’re toast. The nearly two dozen participants in this terrific, if depressing, show propose an art for the Anthropocene, in which time has accelerated (Martin John Callanan’s airport departure board cycles eerily fast), the seasons are out of whack (Charles Burchfield’s “Summer” features a tree, December-bare), and no purchase of organic strawberries will outweigh the ten billion metric tons of carbon spewed forth each year. An eighteenth-century theatrical scene, featuring an artificial sun, leads all too inevitably to AlexisRockman’s trash-strewn seascape, featuring a drowning elephant and a capsizing container ship. The ever-sharp Pierre Huyghe and the young filmmaker Erin Shirreff also make strong contributions, but the most haunting work is an anonymous video from the destroyed power plant at Fukushima, in which a single man points his finger in silent accusation at the camera, at the polluters, at us. Through Aug. 8.

After The War & A Dream Turns Sour- BAC

Chris Hong writes:

There are more thoughtful pieces such as Wars During My Lifetime, which is a newspaper by Martin John Callanan listing all wars between 1982-2014 and read aloud by a town crier at various times throughout the day. It is a sobering and thoughtfully simple piece that highlights the number of conflicts and the lack of progress we have made in reducing them.

full review here.

Make the Living Look Dead

Book Works
Make the Living Look Dead
June 7 – July 26, 2014

bookworks_cannons

Opening reception Saturday June 7, 3-6pm

For Make the Living Look Dead, Book Works invited a selection of artists it has previously worked with over the last 30 years to make a new work on A4 paper as a contribution, intervention or fictionalization for its archive. Each work plays with notions of time and exposes the fragility of coherence inherent in the archive. Contributions range from original discarded material to found objects or fabricated letters, as well as new work masquerading as past proposals or future projections of sequels, panegyrics or unfinished work.

Participating artists are: An Endless Supply, Steve Beard and Victoria Halford, Pavel Büchler, Martin John Callanan, Brian Catling, Adam Chodzko, Jeremy Deller, Mark Dion, Giles Eldridge, Ruth Ewan, Luca Frei, Dora García, Beatrice Gibson and Will Holder, Liam Gillick, Susan Hiller, Karl Holmqvist, Stewart Home, Hanne Lippard, Jonathan Monk, Bridget Penney, Sarah Pierce, Elizabeth Price, Laure Prouvost, Clunie Reid, John Russell, Slavs and Tatars, NaoKo TakaHashi, Nick Thurston, Lynne Tillman, Mark Titchner, Alison Turnbull, Eva Weinmayr, and Neal White.

This project will be shown alongside recent publications commissioned by Book Works and a series of poster projects by: Fabienne Audéoud and John Russell, Stewart Home, Inventory, Jonathan Monk.

Live Events with HEAD Gallery, Jarett Kobek, Maxi Kim and others to be announced.

2nd Cannons project space
2245 E Washington Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90021

Distribution as a Process for Online Technology

Pauline de Souza
GSTF Journal on Computing (JoC) Vol.3 No.4, April 2014

This article considers how distribution as a process interacts with technology and how users engage with distribution. It is not the first time that the relationship between distribution and technology has been discussed. It was discussed a curatorial practice for online technologies by CRUMB (Curatorial Resource for Upstart Media Bliss) on its 2012-2013 list. some of the discussions about distribution relate it to the visualisation of data within curatorial practice locating it within social and cultural debates. CRUMBS’s online group discussions looked at how the actions of curators, artists and gamers created social environments for people to interact with. Also Furtherfield art projects looked at the accessibility of online technology for people from low economic backgrounds. While mapping projects relate different data to other sources. However, this is not the only way to consider distribution. To comprehend distribution as a process this article discusses the different levels of distribution.

Departure of All cited as example.

Read full paper [PDF]

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