Scaling the Sublime

art at the limits of landscape

Saturday 24 March – Sunday 17 June 2018
Djanogly Gallery
Free

This exhibition explores affinities with Romanticism in contemporary art practice, and the continuing fascination of the Landscape Sublime. Drawn to subjects such as mountains, glaciers, the icecaps, forests, the ocean, the moon and the remotest stars, the artists included have found new ways of reflecting on our relationship with the unimaginable forces of nature, even in our age of technological advance and the unprecedented expansion of knowledge.

Working across a variety of media and often drawing on expertise from other disciplines through collaboration, these artists embrace the newest processes and techniques as well as traditional methods of image making. The resulting works move through registers of wonder, melancholy, futility and absurdity.

Scaling the Sublime includes work by: Martin John Callanan, Simon Faithfull, Tim Knowles, Mariele Neudecker, Rebecca Partridge, Katie Paterson, and Richard T Walker. Curated by Nicholas Alfrey and Rebecca Partridge.

https://www.lakesidearts.org.uk/exhibitions/event/3700/scaling-the-sublime.html

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies
11th May – 10th June 2017

This exhibition comprises a trilogy of interconnected works that examines the role of technology and data and how it relates to the human condition in an age of hyper information. In a world dominated by digital media and the instant accessibility of information, his practice crosses the boundary between art and science to reveal the paradox of the promise of infinite knowledge and an absolute vision against its impossibility due to the transient nature of human perception.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

The Fundamental Units: The lowest denomination coin from each of the world’s 166 active currencies are photographed to vast scale using an infinite focus, optical 3D microscope. Printed to a size of 1.2 x 1.2 metres from files with over 400 million pixels, the hyper-real level of detail, beyond normal vision, reveals the material construction and make-up of the coin together with the marks and traces from their circulation and use as tokens of exchange.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

A Planetary Order: This is a 3D scale model of the earth showing cloud cover from one single moment in time. Raw information from one second’s worth of readings from all six cloud monitoring satellites overseen by NASA and ESA is transformed into a physical visualisation of real-time scientific data that delicately outlines and profiles the clouds emerging across the sphere. The sphere, or globe, has no added colour, only the sculpted whiteness of the raw material that throws a maze of faint shadows across the structure.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Text Trends: This looks at our perception of words and data when displayed in graphical form. Through animation, it uses Google data to explore the content generated by search queries and reduces this process to its essential elements: search terms -vs- frequency searched over time, presented in the form of a graph. The viewer watches the animation plot out the ebb and flow of search terms generated by internet users around the world. Pairs of words such as ‘now and later’ and ‘summer and winter’ play out matter-of-factly, with all the passion of a market index. Originally an animation, it has also been commissioned as a series of prints.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

I Wanted to See All of the News From Today: collects everyday over 600 front covers of newspapers from around the world.

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Data Soliloquies, solo exhibition at Argentea Gallery, Birmingham

Argentea Gallery

Data Soliloquies, exhibition. Essay by Thierry Fournier

Data Soliloquies, exposition. Essai par Thierry Fournier

Opening invite

Argentea Gallery
28 St Paul’s SquareBirmingham B3 1RB
United Kingdom

Data Soliloquies, exhibition. Essay by Thierry Fournier

Martin John Callanan, Data Soliloquies

en français

In his short story “The Library of Babel”, published in 1944, the Argentinian author Jorge Luis Borges imagines the whole of human culture brought together in a labyrinthine library. The books it contains represent the obsessive organisation of all conceivable human thought, in every language and from its beginnings. The concept harks back to the idea that knowledge could ultimately be grasped in its entirety, leading to mastery and omnipotence.

The artwork of Martin John Callanan (Birmingham, 1982) inevitably recalls this literary allusion, but it is immediately clear that it illustrates the way in which our relationship with technology has exactly reversed the terms of its argument. In contrast to Borges, who imagined that all knowledge could be made visible in one place, Callanan acknowledges that today we live in a decentralised information network that irrevocably determines the way we live. When he describes himself as “an artist researching an individual’s place within systems”, the “place” he refers to does not describe an aesthetic relationship in the traditional sense, in which the observer is dissociated from the things observed; it assumes that we are inextricably connected with them.

The exhibition Data Soliloquies establishes a relationship between three works that are clearly complementary in this way. The sculpture A Planetary Order features a 3D scale model of the earth, on which a series of satellite data is combined to show the exact state of the Earth’s cloud cover on a given date. It stands on the floor, making it seem vulnerable, and demonstrates that a phenomenon that is so transitory, while at the same time represented by “hard” data, is fundamentally impossible to grasp, and always beyond complete human perception: technology has not overridden what is incommensurable. The printed series Text Trends is a statistical comparison of Google searches for pairs of words, from 2004 to the present. The self-referential nature of the relationships between the chosen words (winter/summer, buy/sell, etc.) and the fierce humour that emerges from them, reflect the expectations embodied in these statistics: they represent actual searches of users. Something that might be taken as a single measurement reveals itself to be also an oracle, whose performativity determines our behaviour. Lastly, The Fundamental Units is a series of images each of which shows the smallest value coin used in various national currencies, photographed using a 3D optical microscope at the National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, UK. These images are then expanded and printed in extra-large formats, so that they show the all traces of the handling they have undergone, and thus the paradoxical physicality of money, whose exchange is now entirely dematerialised.

Despite their power and clear visual precision, these objects sometimes appear cold, as if placed at a distance: the white earth, statistics, coins. They are the product of a conceptual, minimalist approach that emphasises protocol. In addition, they contain no trace of the artist: unlike other recent conceptual works which compare human physicality with repetitive systems, as in the case of Roman Opalka or On Kawara, Martin John Callanan does not introduce his own actions into his work, or only very rarely. Moreover and strictly speaking, it hardly matters if we know the positions of the clouds on a given date, the development of Google searches or the way in which the coins in our pockets have aged: in themselves these facts and these objects include nothing that would give them the status of an artwork. In that case, where do we get the feeling that these works speak so profoundly about ourselves?

It is at once clear that what these artworks have in common is that they talk about value, and its direct connection with the way generalised quantification has become the dominant paradigm and the universal criterion for representing and evaluating human affairs. Callanan also addresses the idea of value from a very specific point of view, namely an almost deliberate focus on representing totalities. An overview of his work reveals the consistency of that approach, seen even in their titles: every flight departure, every internet search, every war waged during the artist’s lifetime, all his actions when using software, every telephone number, the number of people who have ever lived, the number of days of his life, every newspaper front-page, every cloud present above the earth at a given moment, to visit the whole of London, and so on. This approach may seem simplistic but it selects precisely those phenomena to which our sensory experience never gives us complete access. Given that the world of data is characterised by the very fact that the global calculations performed by systems are beyond human perception, can artworks reverse that relationship?

We then see that each of these artworks takes a specific physical form, which reflects a profound knowledge of coding, networks and computing, applied to a wide range of forms: sculptures, prints, artists’ books, objects or performances. Using this vocabulary, Callanan offers a parallel set of “aiming devices” that connect the various totalities in order to show more clearly that we can never have complete control over them: having departure times appear briefly on a screen or a town crier proclaim the dates of wars; printing the clouds on a 3D sculpture that cannot be seen as a whole; demonstrating the performative nature of statistics and opinion polls and the physicality of money, or creating a publication that cannot be read due to its enormous scale. Each of these situations creates a paradox: they open up a divide between, on the one hand, the promise of omniscience and a totalising vision, and on the other, its impossibility, due to the inevitably fugitive and local nature of human perception. It is in this gap, this falling-short, that the agency of Callanan’s works resides.

In this way, by creating a very specific relationship between these successive stages –value, totality, promise and falling-short – Callanan reveals what we expect from these representations. It is a question not so much of value itself, than the desire for value; less one of totality than the dream of totality, less one of control than of what eludes it. All of these issues bring us back to the human condition, its desires and its limitations. This is where we find the poetic but also the profoundly critical aspects of a body of work that brings us face to face with the multiple manifestations of the infinite, only to assert our inability to embrace it. The artwork also emphasises the radically futile nature of all approaches that place an excessive emphasis on technology. What differentiates us from the “systems” invoked by the artist is that we also find meaning in things we do not understand.

This brings to mind the writer and critic John Berger, who showed that one of the specific characteristics of art is not to represent things in themselves but to identify the way we see them, enabling us to interrogate the ways in which that experience is formed and determined, including politically. At a time when many projects facing the issues raised by digital cultures fall into the trap of the figuration (of data, artificial intelligence, surveillance and so on), Martin John Callanan assumes the vain character of such an approach and positions himself at a point where his research leads us to a vertigo. With his characteristic modesty, with his works, their “data soliloquies” and the way they suggest that we would never seize them, he illuminates the specificity of the human’s condition vis-à-vis the immensity of the world.

Thierry Fournier
Aubervilliers, April 2017

Thierry Fournier is a French artist and curator. He also co-directs the curatorial research group Ensad Lab Displays. He lives and works in Aubervilliers.

Translation Imogen Forster

en français

Data Soliloquies, exposition. Essai par Thierry Fournier

in English

Dans sa nouvelle La Bibliothèque de Babel publiée en 1944, l’écrivain argentin Jorge Luis Borges imagine la totalité de la culture humaine exposée dans une bibliothèque à l’architecture labyrinthique. Les livres qu’elle rassemble contiennent toute la pensée imaginable, dans toutes les langues et depuis les origines, obsessionnellement mis en ordre. L’ensemble évoque la promesse d’accéder enfin à la totalité de la connaissance, à travers le rêve d’une maîtrise et d’une toute-puissance du savoir.

Si le travail de Martin John Callanan (Birmingham, 1982) évoque immanquablement cette image littéraire, c’est pour constater aussitôt qu’il témoigne de la manière dont nos relations à la technologie en ont précisément renversé les termes. À l’inverse de Borges qui imaginait que l’ensemble du savoir puisse être visible en un seul lieu, Callanan prend acte que l’humain contemporain est pris dans un réseau d’informations décentralisées qui conditionnent en permanence son existence. Lorsqu’il se décrit comme « an artist researching an individual’s place within systems » (un artiste explorant la place de l’individu parmi des systèmes), la « place » qu’évoque l’artiste ne décrit pas une relation esthétique au sens classique qui dissocierait l’observateur des objets observés : elle prend acte que nous sommes pris dans leurs logiques.

L’exposition Data Soliloquies met ainsi en relation trois œuvres dont les propos sont particulièrement complémentaires à cet égard. La sculpture A Temporary Order figure le globe terrestre en impression 3D à petite échelle, sur lequel est gravé l’état exact des nuages à une date donnée, obtenue par la combinaison de séries d’images par satellite. Posée au sol, comme vulnérable, elle met en évidence qu’un phénomène aussi fugitif, même figé et représenté par ses données, demeure radicalement insaisissable et continue à échapper à notre perception : la technique n’a pas désactivé l’incommensurable. La série d’impressions Text Trends montre quant à elle des statistiques comparées de paires de mots issues des requêtes sur Google de 2004 à nos jours. Le caractère tautologique des associations de mots choisis et l’humour féroce qui s’en dégage (été-hiver, acheter-vendre, etc.) témoigne des attentes que reflètent ces statistiques : il s’agit bien de requêtes formulées par des utilisateurs. Ce que l’on pourrait prendre comme une seule mesure est aussi un oracle, dont la dimension performative conditionne nos comportements. Enfin, The Fondamental Units est une série d’images montrant chaque fois les plus petites unités de pièces de monnaies internationales, photographiées au microscope électronique au National Physical Laboratory de Teddington (Royaume-Uni). Ces images sont ensuite démesurément agrandies et imprimées sur de très grands formats, révélant alors toutes les traces des échanges dont elles ont été l’objet – et, par la même, la physicalité paradoxale d’une monnaie dont les échanges sont aujourd’hui entièrement dématérialisés.

Malgré leur force et leur précision plastique évidente, ces objets sont parfois froids, comme mis à distance : globe blanc, statistiques, pièces de monnaie. Ils héritent d’une approche conceptuelle et minimaliste qui privilégie les protocoles. En outre, toute trace de l’artiste en est absente : par opposition à des démarches qui, dans l’histoire de l’art récente, ont confronté l’humain et sa corporéité à des systèmes répétititifs, comme celles de Roman Opalka ou de On Kawara, Martin John Callanan – à de très rares exceptions – ne met pas en jeu ses propres actions. En outre, à strictement parler, peu nous importe de savoir quelles étaient les positions des nuages à une date donnée, de connaître l’évolution de requêtes sur Google ou encore comment vieillit la petite monnaie : ces faits ou ces objets en eux-mêmes n’évoquent rien qui les rapprocheraient du statut d’une œuvre. Comme extraits du monde, ils semblent être des objets trouvés dans un champ de données. D’où nous vient alors le sentiment que ces œuvres nous parlent aussi profondément de nous-mêmes ?

Le premier constat qui émerge alors est que ces œuvres ont toutes en commun de parler de la valeur, qui interroge directement la manière dont la quantification généralisée s’est imposée aujourd’hui comme paradigme dominant et comme critère omniprésent de représentation et d’évaluation de l’humain. Callanan convoque en outre cette notion de valeur à travers une perspective très spécifique, qui est de viser presque systématiquement la représentation de totalités. Un regard sur l’ensemble de ses œuvres témoigne de la constance de cette démarche, que l’on retrouve même dans leurs titres : toutes les partances de vols, toutes les recherches sur internet, toutes les guerres pendant ma vie, toutes mes commandes sur un logiciel, tous les numéros de téléphone, le nombre de tous ceux qui ont jamais vécu, le compte de tous les jours de ma vie, toutes les unes de la presse, tous les nuages présents en un instant au-dessus de la Terre, voir tout Londres, etc. Cette démarche de all-everything pourrait sembler simpliste mais elle sélectionne justement des phénomènes auquel notre expérience sensible ne nous donne jamais totalement accès. Alors que le régime des données se caractérise justement par le fait que des totalités calculées par des systèmes échappent à la perception humaine, des œuvres peuvent-elle renverser cette relation ?

On voit alors que ces projets déploient chaque fois une matérialité spécifique, qui témoigne d’une connaissance approfondie du code, du réseau et du numérique tout en embrassant un très large répertoire de formes : sculptures, impressions, livres d’artiste, objets, performances… À travers ce vocabulaire, Callanan propose autant de dispositifs de « visée », qui relatent des totalités pour mieux mettre en évidence l’impossibilité de leur maîtrise : faire fugitivement défiler les horaires de vols sur un écran, faire déclamer les dates des guerres par un crieur, imprimer les nuages sur une sculpture en 3D dont la perception globale est impossible, démontrer le caractère performatif des statistiques et des sondages, mettre en évidence la matérialité de la monnaie, créer une publication devenant illisible par son échelle gigantesque, etc. Chacune de ces situations crée alors un paradoxe : elle ouvre un gouffre entre d’une part la promesse d’une omniscience ou d’une vision totalisante, et d’autre part son impossibilité même, due au caractère irrémédiablement fugitif et local de notre perception. C’est dans cet écart, dans ce manque, que réside fondamentalement l’agentivité de ses œuvres.

Ainsi, par la relation très spécifique que Martin John Callanan élabore entre ces paliers successifs – la valeur, la totalité, la promesse et le manque – il met en évidence ce que nous attendons de ces représentations. Il ne s’agit pas tant de la valeur, que du désir de la valeur ; de la totalité, que du rêve de la totalité ; de la maîtrise, que de ce qui lui échappe. L’ensemble nous ramène à la condition humaine, à son désir et et à ses limites. Ici se revèle la dimension à la fois poétique et fondamentalement critique d’un travail qui nous place face à de multiples manifestations de l’infini pour pointer immédiatement notre impossibilité à l’embrasser, en même temps que le caractère radicalement vain à cet égard de toute démarche techniciste. Ce qui nous différencie des « systèmes » qu’évoque l’artiste est que nous trouvons aussi du sens dans ce que nous ne comprenons pas.

On peut penser ici enfin à l’auteur et critique John Berger, qui relevait qu’une des spécificités de l’art est de ne pas représenter les choses en elles-mêmes mais bien le regard que nous portons sur elles et, par la même, de pouvoir questionner les enjeux de sa formation et de sa détermination (y compris politique). Au moment où, en prise avec les questions ouvertes par la culture numérique, de nombreuses démarches tombent dans le piège de la figuration (des données, de l’intelligence artificielle, de la surveillance…), Martin John Callanan assume ici l’impossibilité radicale d’en venir à bout et s’installe là où cette recherche ouvre sur un vertige. Avec la pudeur qui le caractérise, par ses œuvres, leurs monologues de données et l’incapacité qu’elles évoquent de nous en emparer complètement, il éclaire ainsi la spécificité de la position humaine face à l’infini du monde.

Thierry Fournier
Aubervilliers, avril 2017

Thierry Fournier est un artiste et curateur français. Il co-dirige également le groupe de recherche curatorial EnsadLab Displays. Il vit et travaille à Aubervilliers.

in English

Data on View, Nanterre Art Space

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La Terrasse, Nanterre Art Space
exhibition from 7 October to 23 December 2016
Opening on Friday 7 October 6-9 pm

Data on view Curators: Sandrine Moreau and Thierry Fournier

Works by Martin John Callanan, Marie-Pierre Duquoc Hasan Elahi, Oyvind Fahlstrom, Ashley Hunt, Mark Lombardi, Philippe Mairesse, Claire Mairieux, Julien Prévieux, Ward Shelley, Ali Tnani and Lukas Truniger Publications by James Bridle, Bureau d’études, Eli Commins, Albertine Meunier, On Kawara, Jacopo da Pontormo, Erica Scourti

Performance by Magali Desbazeilles

La Terrasse window: work in situ by Thierry Fournier Documentation space created with Benoît Ferchaud, La Revue Créatique and L’Agora, Nanterre Centre for Citizen Projects, Nanterre

Digital network: websites and movies by Mark Boulas, Brian Knappenberger, Laura Poitras, Sandy Smolan, Mareike Wegener, etc.

The exhibition Data on view brings together a selection of works that offer interpretations of public or personal data through drawing or code: graphs, drawings, network installations, sculptures, publications… These works are addressing various stakes, sensitive and poetic but also critical or political. They question in particular what we expect from data, and how these expectations are likely to define our vision of the world. In this way, the exhibition offers a historical perspective, ranging from Oyvind Fahlström or Mark Lombardi to young international artists, some of whose works are being shown here for the first time in France. It is supplemented by film and web site documentations, which deals with the issues of empowerment and the appropriation of data by citizens.

LA TERRASSE : NANTERRE ART SPACE 57 Boulevard Pesaro 92000 Nanterre, France
press contact: Sandrine Moreau, sandrine.moreau@nanterre.fr
www.nanterre.fr

Exhibition invite (FR) [PDF]

Exhibition leaflet (FR) [PDF]

Exhibition press release (EN) [PDF]

Exhibition leaflet (EN) [PDF]

Photos Thierry Fournier 2016

Mapping Spaces book edited by Ulrike Gehring

Mapping Spaces

This large survey book builds on the ZKM Karlsruhe exhibition tracing the multifaceted relationship between art, science and technology in Dutch landscape art around 1650. Long before digital satellite imagery, Dutch artists used modern systems of remote sensing. Their art works provide valuable insights into past exchanges of knowledge that anticipate the techniques of mapping used today.

Includes A Planetary Order.

Hardcover: 500 pages
Publisher: Hirmer (1 Dec. 2014)
Language: English
ISBN-13: 978-3777422305
Dimensions: 25.5 x 3.8 x 29.4 cm

Visualization in the Age of Computerization (Routledge Studies in Science, Technology and Society)

Objectivity and Representative Practices chapter
Dr Chiara Ambrosio, UCL Department of Science and Technology Studies

Screen Shot 2014-09-05 at 21.32.37

Digitalization and computerization are now pervasive in science. This has deep consequences for our understanding of scientific knowledge and of the scientific process, and challenges longstanding assumptions and traditional frameworks of thinking of scientific knowledge. Digital media and computational processes challenge our conception of the way in which perception and cognition work in science, of the objectivity of science, and the nature of scientific objects. They bring about new relationships between science, art and other visual media, and new ways of practicing science and organizing scientific work, especially as new visual media are being adopted by science studies scholars in their own practice. This volume reflects on how scientists use images in the computerization age, and how digital technologies are affecting the study of science.

Hardcover: 292 pages
Publisher: Routledge (22 Oct 2014)
ISBN-13: 978-0415814454

Mapping Spaces: Networks of Knowledge in the Landscape Art of the 17th Century, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

Mapping Space, ZKM Karlsruhe

12 April – 13 July, 2014
An exhibition at the ZKM Museum of Contemporary Art
Opening: Fri, April 11, 2014, 7 p.m.

The ZKM throws new light on 17th century landscape painting. Comparable to modern satellite surveying (GPS), true to scale landscape representation is also indebted to the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge: the alliance of geodesists, mathematicians, instrument makers and painters. Artists had designed modern surveying systems long before new media drew on images from outer space.

The exhibition Mapping Spaces examines, for the first time ever on this scale, the influence of early modern guide books in geography, the science of surveying and the construction of fortification on Dutch painting around 1650. The prelude to the project, developed at the University of Trier, is Pieter Snayers‘ large-format depiction of historical battle scenes, in which maps and landscape paintings are projected over one another so as to document the most recent developments in modern engineering, ballistics and the fortification construction.

Over 220 exhibits, among them paintings, surveying instruments, graphics devices, books, maps and globes drawn from the most important collections of works, such as from the Prado (Madrid), the Louvre (Paris), the Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam) or the Kunsthistorischen Museum (Vienna) testify to these new theses in pictorial science. The new mapping of an early modern area of knowledge is accompanied by contemporary works of art that thematize the influence of technological developments on our present-day perception of space.

Das ZKM wirft einen neuen Blick auf die Landschaftsmalerei des 17. Jahrhunderts. Vergleichbar der modernen Satellitenvermessung (GPS) verdankt sich auch die maßstäbliche Landschaftsaufnahme einem verzweigten Netzwerk des Wissens: der Allianz von Geodäten, Mathematikern, Instrumentenbauern und Malern. Lange bevor die Neuen Medien sich also digitaler Bilder aus dem All bedienten, entwarfen Künstler moderne Fernerkundungssysteme.

Die Ausstellung „Mapping Spaces“ untersucht erstmals in diesem Umfang den Einfluss frühneuzeitlicher Handbücher zur Geographie, der Vermessungskunde und dem Festungsbau auf die niederländische Malerei um 1650. Den Auftakt des an der Universität Trier entwickelten Projektes bilden die großformatigen Kriegspanoramen Pieter Snayers, in denen Karten und Landschaftsbilder übereinander projiziert werden, um die neuesten Errungenschaften des modernen Ingenieurwesens, der Ballistik und des Festungsbaus zu dokumentieren.

Mehr als 220 Exponate, darunter Gemälde, Messinstrumente, Zeichengeräte, Bücher, Karten und Globen aus den bedeutendsten Sammlungen der Welt wie dem Prado (Madrid), dem Louvre (Paris), dem Rijksmuseum (Amsterdam) oder dem Kunsthistorischen Museum (Wien) belegen diese neue, bildwissenschaftliche These. Die Neu-Kartierung eines frühneuzeitlichen Wissensraumes wird begleitet von zeitgenössischen Kunstwerken, die den Einfluss technologischer Entwicklungen auf unsere heutige Raumwahrnehmung thematisieren.

500 page book accompanies the exhibition

Wie funktioniert Echtzeit, und wie fühlt sie sich an?

Taz.de

Das Irre an der Zeit ist, dass sie trotz eines wissenschaftlichen Einheitssystems eine überaus subjektive, stets changierende Größe ist. Etwa die, auf die Martin John Callanan aufmerksam macht. Sieben Jahre hat er ein Programm entwickelt und es mit Datenleitungen verknüpft, um in Echtzeit weltweit alle abgehenden Flüge komprimiert zu visualisieren. Aber wer mag wohl im Flieger nach Dubai auf Platz E 12 sitzen? Wie schaut er aus? Wie dem Datenmeer Sinnvolles entnehmen? Und was würde es bringen, so lange, wie es vermutlich dauern würde? Überlegungen, die in wenigen Sekunden aufblitzen. Anders Katie Patersons Skulptur nur wenige Meter entfernt: ein Plattenspieler, der in Erdrotationsgeschwindigkeit Vivaldis “Vier Jahreszeiten” abspielt – eine Runde am Tag. Aber Moment: Nach innen verjüngen sich die Kreise. Verlangsamt sich das Gerät? Dehnt sich die Zeit? Zeit ist eben relativ.
Bis 15. Februar, Di-Sa 11-18 Uhr, Friedrichstr. 123

article

A Planetary Order, Galerie Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin

A Planetary Order, Galerie Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin A Planetary Order, Galerie Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin A Planetary Order, Galerie Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin A Planetary Order, Galerie Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin A Planetary Order, Galerie Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin A Planetary Order, Galerie Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin

A Planetary Order
Martin John Callanan, Rebecca Partridge, Katie Paterson
Galerie Christian Ehrentraut, Berlin
10 January – 15 February 2014

Download the exhibition publication (PDF)

A Planetary Order brings together three artists who, though working in very different media, all explore meta-narratives of time, landscape and systematic abstraction with a combination of sincerity and playfulness. The juxtaposition of painting, sculpture and new media works emphasises the conceptual concerns of the artists who also share a meticulous minimalist aesthetic. The works hover between seriousness and humour, the romantic and the rational, reduction and sublime scale, all within a dialogue which encompasses works made both with highly traditional means and the most current new media technology. The exhibition reflects a growing interest in a return to metaphysical themes, which though sincere, is not without critical distance and awareness of the comical.

The exhibition found its name in Martin John Callanan’s A Planetary Order (Terrestrial Cloud Globe) a 3D printed globe which, sitting directly on the gallery floor, on close inspection reveals the cloud cover of one single moment in time. This inconspicuous piece is in fact an ambitious ‘physical visualisation of real-time scientific data’ taken from cloud monitoring satellites overseen by NASA and the European Space Agency. Callanan’s transformation of data into artworks which articulate both the enormity of interconnected global systems and our place within them, continues with his most recent work, Departure of All; a flight departure board displaying the flight information for every international airport around the world. Running in real time, the speed of global transit creates a dizzying account of single moments. Katie Paterson provides a counterpoint to this overwhelm with her imperceptibly slow work, As The World Turns; a record player which, rotating at the speed of the earth, plays Vivaldi’s Four Seasons audible through headphones to only the most attentive listener. As with Callanan, Paterson’s artwork occupies a space far greater than the actual work- activating an imaginative space which is both metaphysical and comic; the record player suggesting the turning earth which we are able to look down upon. Along the long wall of the gallery hangs Notes on The Sea, a (diptych in twelve parts) the series of twelve minimal photorealist paintings calmly depicts fog veiled seascapes as polarities of night and day. In this work the archetypal romantic image enters into a contradiction with itself as it becomes part of a system. Playing with notions of duration, mathematic abstraction, and the possibility of painting a beautiful landscape, Partridge’s attempt to rationalize the epitomised romantic landscape is both meditative and absurd.

Biographies

Martin John Callanan
1982, UK. Lives and works in Berlin and London

Martin John Callanan’s artwork has been exhibited and published internationally, he has recently been awarded the prestigious Philip Leverhulme Prize for outstanding research within visual arts. Recent solo exhibiitons include Departure of All, Noshowspace (UK) and Martin John Callanan, Horrach Moya (Spain). His work has been shown as part of Open Cube White Cube, (UK), Along Some Sympathetic Lines, Or Gallery (Germany), Es Baluard Modern and Contemporary Art Museum (Mallorca), Whitechapel Gallery (UK), Ars Electronic Centre (Austria), ISEA, Future,Everything, Riga Centre for New Media Culture (Latvia), Whitstable Biennale (UK),, and Imperial War Museum North (UK). Callanan graduated with an MFA from the Slade School of Fine Art, London in 2005, where he is currently Teaching Fellow in Fine Art Media.

Rebecca Partridge
1976, UK. Lives and works in Berlin and London

Rebecca Partridge gained an MA in Fine Art from the Royal Academy Schools, London in 2007, since which time she has been exhibiting internationally. Recent solo exhibitions include In The Daytime at Kunsthalle CCA Andratx (Spain), Cabinet Paintings at Newcastle University, (UK), as well as numerous international group exhibitions most recently Verstand und Gefühl, Landscape und der Zeitgenössiche Romantik at Springhornhof Neuenkirchen. In 2008 she was awarded a fellowship from Terra Foundation of American Art in Giverny (France). Other awarded residencies include the Sanskriti Foundation (New Dehli, India); Kunsthalle CCA (Spain); Nes residency (Iceland) and the TIPP Program for Contemporary Art (Hungary). She is currently working on several curatorial projects and is a Lecturer on both BA and MA Fine Art at West Dean College, UK.

Katie Paterson
1981, UK Lives and works in Berlin

Katie Paterson graduated from the Slade School of Fine Art, London in 2007. Paterson’s work is known internationally, recent solo exhibitions include In Another Time, Mead Gallery (University of Warwick, UK) Katie Paterson, Kettle’s Yard (Cambridge, UK) Inside This Desert, BAWAG Contemporary (Vienna) and 100 Billion Suns at Haunch of Venison (London). Her works have been exhibited in major exhibitions such as the Light Show at the Hayward Gallery (London); Dissident Futures, Yerba Buena Centre for the Arts (San Francisco); Light and Landscape at Storm King Art Centre (Hudson Valley, USA); Marking Time at MCA (Sydney) Continuum at James Cohan Gallery (New York) and Altermodern at Tate Britain (UK). She is represented in collections including the Guggenheim (New York) and Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art (Edinburgh).

Gallery info and plan PDF
Exhibition dossier
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Fakturen, Leuphana University of Lüneburg

fakturen, Martin John Callanan

Eine Ausstellung organisiert vom Leuphana Arts Program (LAP)

zu Gast im Kunstraum der Leuphana Universität Lüneburg

Kunst und Wissenschaft stehen in einem komplexen und spannungsreichen Verhältnis. Die Ausstellung des Leuphana Arts Program präsentiert fünf künstlerische Positionen, die mit ihren Methoden und Resultaten nicht wissenschaftliche Projekte oder Forschungsfelder visualisieren wollen, sondern die in ihrem je eigenen ästhetischen Modus über die Möglichkeiten von Wissen und Erkennen reflektieren und Interpretationen wissenschaftlicher Beobachtungen, Datensätze und Szenarien anbieten. Indem sie den Fokus auf Grauzonen wissenschaftlicher Wahrnehmung legen, schärfen die Werke und Projekte der Ausstellung den Blick für die medialen und epistemologischen Bedingungen wissenschaftlicher Praxis.

Mit Arbeiten von Martin John Callanan (UK), Driessens & Verstappen (NL), Sabrina Raaf (US), Jan-Peter E.R. Sonntag (D) und Herwig Turk (A/PT)

Kuratiert von Andreas Broeckmann und Alexandra Waligorski

im Rahmen der GfM Jahrestagung 2013

Ort: Kunstraum der Leuphana Universität Lüneburg, Campus Halle 25
Laufzeit: 3.10. – 9.11.2013
Öffnungszeiten: Mi – Sa 12-16 Uhr (am Do 3.10 und Fr 4.10. bis 22 Uhr)
Eröffnungsempfang: Do 3.10. 19-23 Uhr

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Night on the Brocken, Nicholas Alfrey

Martin John Callanan’s work engages most directly with scientific methods: his A Planetary Order (Terrestrial Cloud Globe) utilizes the complex apparatus of state-backed meteorological data collection to model a single moment in the atmospheric history of the planet. The cloud cover as recorded by six cloud-monitoring satellites is mapped on to a globe, a physical (rather than virtual) object created by means of cutting-edge digital manufacturing technology. It is the counterpart to Constable’s cloud studies for the age of IT, but whereas for Constable clouds were ‘the chief organ of sentiment’ in a picture, they can now be visualised as forming an entire global regime. The piece gains a touching, almost absurd, quality of understatement through the disparity of its unassuming physical presence and the prodigious depth and scope of the knowledge it encapsulates.

Extract from the essay Night on the Brocken, Nicholas Alfrey, to accompany the exhibition Reason and Emotion Landscape and the Contemporary Romantic, Springhornhof.

Purchase the book via Amazon.

Wir laden ein zu einem romantischen Sonntag auf dem Lande!

I shall be at Springhornhof this weekend 7 July 2013 for the current exhibition featuring of A Planetary Order and the exhibition book launch.

Am Sonntag, dem 7. Juli 2013

11 Uhr Fahrradtour zur Kunst in der Landschaft

mit den Kuratorinnen Rebecca Partridge, Randi Nygård und Bettina v. Dziembowski geht es zu Landschaftskunstwerken in der Umgebung des Dorfes, die besondere Bezüge zur Epoche der Romantik haben.

Teilnahme frei / Leihfahrrad € 5 (bitte reservieren!)

13 Uhr Zwiebelkuchen & Salat im Springhornhof

14 Uhr Rundgang mit den Kuratorinnen und anwesenden Künstlern durch die Ausstellung “Verstand & Gefühl – Landschaft und die zeitgenössische Romantik”

Wir freuen uns, an diesem Tag den druckfrischen Ausstellungskatalog mit zahlreichen Abbildungen und Texten von Rebecca Partridge, Randi Nygård und Nicholas Alfrey vorstellen zu können!

Die Ausstellung “Verstand & Gefühl – Landschaft und die zeitgenössische Romantik”, die noch bis zum 18. August im Springhornhof zu sehen ist, zeigt Arbeiten von elf internationalen Künstlern die einen Bezug zu Motiven, Gefühlslagen und Ideen der Epoche der Romantik haben. Ein Anliegen der Kunst der Romantik war die Vermittlung intensiver Gefühlszustände in Beziehung mit einer tiefen metaphysischen Verbundenheit zur Natur.
Die Werke in der Ausstellung können in Verbindung mit den Landschaftskunstwerken gelesen werden, die seit den 1970er Jahren rund um das Dorf Neuenkirchen entstanden sind. Die Geschichte der Land Art, ist mit den Fragestellungen der Romantik untrennbar verbunden. In den 1970er Jahren verliessen Künstler wie Walter de Maria und Richard Long die Museen und Galerien, um abgelegene Territorien als Schauplätze und Material für die Kunst zu erschliessen. Die Verbindung der Land Art zur Romantik wurde auch durch das wachsende Bewusstsein von der ökologischen Krise beeinflusst. Viele Künstlerinnen und Künstler haben versucht, die Verwundbarkeit der Natur ins Bild zu setzen, so wie Nils-Udo, der sich 1978 wie ein junger Vogel in ein riesiges, aus dichten Zweigen geflochtenes Nest in einem Waldstück nahe dem Springhornhof kauerte.

Wir danken dem Land Niedersachsen, dem Lüneburgischen Landschaftsverband, dem Office for Contemporary Arts Norway (OCA), der Königlich Norwegische Botschaft Berlin und dem Billedkunstnernes Vederlagsfond (Oslo) für die Förderung der Ausstellung, des Katalogs und der Begleitveranstaltungen.

Verstand und Gefühl, Landschaft und die Zeitgenössische Romantik, Kunstverein Springhornhof, Neuenkirchen, Germany

VERSTAND & GEFÜHL / Landschaft und die zeitgenössische Romantik

VERSTAND & GEFÜHL / Landschaft und die zeitgenössische Romantik

VERSTAND & GEFÜHL / Landschaft und die zeitgenössische Romantik
Kunstverein Springhornhof, Neuenkirchen, Germany
15. Juni – 18. August 2013

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Kuratiert von Rebecca Partridge und Bettina v. Dziembowski

Wohl kaum eine Epoche ist durch so viele Missverständnisse und Widersprüche geprägt wie die „sentimentale“ Romantik und wohl kaum eine Epoche hat unser nordeuropäisches Verhältnis zur Natur und zum Individuum so nachhaltig geprägt. Davon ausgehend setzt die Ausstellung „Verstand & Gefühl“ Motive und Ideenwelten der Romantik in Bezug zu den Arbeiten von elf zeitgenössischen Künstlerinnen und Künstlern.

Charakteristisch für die Romantik des 19. Jhdts. ist die Verlagerung des Interesses vom Verstand zum Gefühl, von der Berechnung zur Intuition, von objektiver Betrachtung zur subjektiven Wahrnehmung. Ein Anliegen der Kunst war der Ausdruck des Individuums, die Vermittlung intensiver Gefühlszustände insbesondere in Beziehung mit einer tiefen metaphysischen Verbundenheit zur Natur.

Die Romantik war jedoch nicht nur paradiesisch und schön, sie umfasste auch das Subversive von Entgrenzungserlebnissen. Künstler wie Delacroix oder Goya stellten in ihren Schreckensszenarien ungezügelte Gefühle dar. Bilder ruinösen Verfalls bei Caspar David Friedrich oder William Turner erinnerten an die Macht der Natur sich die Zivilisation zurückzuerobern.

Vorherrschend jedoch, insbesondere unter den Malern, war die Darstellung unermesslich weiter unzivilisierter Landstriche, deren idealisierte Erhabenenheit die unauflösliche Beziehung des Menschen zur Natur zum Ausdruck brachten. Ehrfurcht einflössend und beängstigend zugleich wird der Betrachter damit konfrontiert, seine eigene Position im Universum zu hinterfragen: Die äussere Landschaft dient als Metapher für eine innere Erfahrung.

In den im Springhornhof gezeigten Arbeiten erweist sich die Romantik als Weltanschauung, die in unterschiedlichsten Strategien der Aneignung aufgenommen, fortgeführt, kritisiert und transformiert wird. Dabei geht es um mehr als um die Wiederbelebung einer Skala von Motiven, die als wehmütige Versatzstücke einer glorreichen Vergangenheit in die zeitgenössische Kunst herübergerettet werden.

Die heutige Romantik ist eine Metaromantik, die nicht nur Schwermut und starke Empfindung zeigt, sondern auch ein Distanzbewusstsein, das sich in ironischen Brechungen äußert. So spielen die beteiligten Künstlerinnen und Künstler nicht nur auf den Topos der romantischen Sehnsucht nach der Natur-Idylle an, sondern auch auf die Umstände dieser Realitätsflucht. Hinter der Sehnsucht nach dem Paradiesischen, Schönen und Märchenhaften ist das Abgründige ebenso präsent wie das Wissen um das Scheitern von Utopien.

REASON & EMOTION / Landscape and the contemporary Romantic

Hardly any epoch has been marked by so many misunderstandings and contradictions as the “sentimental” Romantic era, just as hardly any epoch has so shaped our northern European relationship between nature and the indiviual. On this basis the exhibition “Reason and Emotion” explores ideas and motifs derived from Romanticism in relation to the work of eleven contemporary artists.

Characteristic of the Romanticism of the 19th Century is the shift of interest from reason to feeling, computation to intuition, objective observation to subjective perception. One aim of art at this time was the expression of the individual, the mediation of intense emotional states, particularly in relationship with a deep metaphysical connection to nature.

However, the Romantic was not only heavenly and beautiful, it also included the delineation of subversive experiences. Artists such as Delacroix and Goya presented scenarios of unbridled emotions in all their horror. Caspar David Friedrich and William Turner recalled the power of nature to regain civilisation through dark images of ruinous decay.

Predominantly, however, especially among the painters, was the presentation of immeasurably more uncivilised lands, whose idealised grandeur expressed the indissoluble relationship of man to nature. Awe-inspiring and frightening at the same time, the viewer is confronted with the question of his own position in the universe: the outer landscape serves as a metaphor for an inner experience.

In the works shown in Springhornhof the Romantic pervades, however not as a revival of a set of motifs sentimentally salvaged from a glorious past, but incorporated in a variety of strategies of appropriation, continuation, critique and transformation.

Today’s Romanticism is a Meta-Romantic showing not only melancholy and strong sensation, but also a distance, an awareness that manifests itself in ironic reflections. Thus, the participating artists play not only with the notion of romantic longing for nature-idyll, but also with the circumstances of this escapism. Behind the longing for the paradisiacal, the beautiful and fairy-tale, the abyss is just as present as the knowledge of the failure of utopias.

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Data Soliloquies book review on Furtherfield by Pau Waelder

Book review by Pau Waelder – 03/02/2010

Data Soliloquies is a book about the extraordinary cultural fluidity of scientific data

Data Soliloquies
Richard Hamblyn and Martin John Callanan
London: Slade Press, 2009
112 pages
ISBN 978-0903305044

Although much has been said about C.P. Snow’s concept of a “third culture”, we haven’t actually reached an understanding between the spheres of science and humanities. This is caused in part by the high degree of specialisation in each field, which usually prevents researchers from considering different perspectives, as well as the controversies that have arisen between academics, exemplified by publications such as Intellectual Impostures (1998) in which physicists Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont criticise the “abuse” of scientific terminology by sociologists and philosophers. Yet there is a growing mutual dependency of both fields of knowledge, as the one hand our society is facing new problems and questions for which the sciences have adequate answers and on the other scientific research can no longer remain isolated from society. Some scientists, such as the astronomer Roger Frank Malina, have even argued that a “better science” will result from the interaction between art, science and technology. Malina presents as an example the “success of the artist in residence and art-science collaboration programs currently being established” [1], and considers the possibility of a “scientist in residence” program in art labs.

Data Soliloquies

Our relationship with the environment is certainly one of the main problems we are going to face during this century and it is also a subject that brings up the necessary communication between science and society. The UCL Environment Institute [2] was established in 2003 to promote an interdisciplinary approach to environmental research and make it available to a wider audience. While being representative of almost every discipline in the University College London, it lacked an interaction with the arts and humanities. This gap has been bridged by establishing an artist and writer residency program in collaboration with the Slade School of Fine Arts and the English Department. Among 100 applications, writer Richard Hamblyn and artist Martin John Callanan were chosen for the 2008-2009 academic year: Data Soliloquies is the result of their work.

Despite “belonging” to the field of art and humanities, neither Hamblyn nor Callanan are strangers to science and technology. Richard Hamblyn is an environmental writer and historian who has developed a particular interest in clouds, and Martin John Callanan is an artist whose remarkably conceptual work merges art and different types of media. This may be the cause that Data Soliloquies is by no means a shy penetration into a foreign field of knowledge but a solid discourse which presents a richly documented critique of the apparently ineffective ways in which scientists have made society aware of such a crucial problem as that of climate change. The title of the book has been borrowed for a term that Jon Adams, researcher at the London School of Economics, coined to refer to Michael Crichton’s novels, who uses “scientific” facts to give his imaginative plots an aura of credibility. With this reference, the authors state that the way scientific data is presented actually constitutes a narrative, an uncontested monologue: “…scientific graphs and images have powerful stories to tell, carrying much in the way of overt and implied narrative content (…) these stories are rarely interrupted or interrogated.”[3]

As the amount of data regularly stored in all sorts of digital supports increases exponentially, and new forms of data visualisation are developed, these “data monologues” become ubiquitous, while remaining unquestioned. In his text, Hamblyn exposes the inexactitude in some popular visualisations of scientific data, which have set aside accuracy in favour of providing a more eloquent image of what the gathered evidences are supposed to tell. On the one hand, Charles D. Keeling’s upward trending graph of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, which according to Hamblyn is “probably the most important data set in environmental science, and has become something of a freestanding scientific icon”[4], or Michael Mann’s controversial “Hockey Stick” graph are illustrative examples of the way in which information displays have developed their own narratives. On the other, the manipulation of data in order to obtain a more visually effective presentation, such as NASA’s exaggeration of scale in their images of the landscape of Venus or the use of false colours in the reproductions of satellite images, call for a questioning of the supposed objectivity in the information provided by scientific institutions.

Data Soliloquies

In the field of climate science, the stories that graphs and other visualisations can tell have become of great importance, as human activity has a direct impact on global warming, but this relation of cause and effect cannot be easily determined. As Hamblyn states: “climate change is the first major environmental crisis in which the experts appear more alarmed than the public” [5]. The catastrophism with which environmental issues are presented to the public generate a feeling of impotence, and thus any action that an individual can undertake seems ineffective. The quick and resolute reaction of both the population and the governments in the case of the “ozone hole” in 1985 points in the direction of finding a clear and compelling image of the effects of climate change. As Hamblyn underscores, this is not only a subject for engineers: “the reality of ongoing climate change has yet to be embraced as a stimulus to creativity –in the arts as well as the sciences– or as a permanent and inescapable part of human societal development” [6].

Data Soliloquies

Martin John Callanan took upon himself to develop a creative response to this issue, and has done so, not simply by creating images or objects but by depicting processes. He states: “I’m more interested in systems –systems that define how we live our lives” [6]. A quick look at his previous work [7] will show how appropriate this statement is: he has visited each and every station of the London underground, collected every command of the Photoshop application in his computer, officially changed his name (to the same he already had), gathered the front page of hundreds of newspapers from around the world and engaged himself in many other activities that are as systematic and mechanical as ironic, poetic or simply nihilistic. During his residency, Callanan created to main projects. The first one, Planetary Order, is a globe in which the patterns of the clouds on a particular date (February 6th, 2009) have been sculpted. The artist composed the readings of NASA’s cloud monitoring satellites in a virtual 3D computer model, which was then laser melted on a compacted nylon powder sphere at the Digital Manufacturing Centre at the UCL Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment. The resulting object is a sculpture, an artwork more than any sort of model in the sense that it develops a discourse beyond the actual presentation of data. An impeccable white sphere textured by its subtle protuberances, the globe evokes the perfection of an ancient marble sculpture while presenting us with an uncommon view of the Earth, covered with clouds. The clouds, which are usually erased in the depictions of our planet in order to let us see the shapes of the continents (the land which is our dominion), become an icon of climate change and the image of an order which is, in all senses, above us. Callanan freezes the planetary order of clouds in an impossible map, a metaphorical object which appears to us as a faultless, yet fragile and inscrutable machine.

The second of Callanan’s artistic projects is the series Text Trends. Using Google data, the artist has collected the number of searches for selected terms related to climate change in a time range of several years (from 2004 to 2007-2008). With this data, he has generated a series of minimalistic graphs in which two jagged lines, one red and the other blue, cross the page describing the frequency of searches (or popularity) for two competing terms. The result resembles an electrocardiogram in which we can see the “life” of a particular word, as opposed to another, in a simple but eloquent dialogue of abstract forms. Callanan has chosen to confront terms in pairs such as “summer vs. winter”, “climate change vs. war on terror” or “global warming”. Simple as they may seem, the graphs are telling and constitute and visual summary of the book whilst suggesting many other reflections. The final conclusion is presented in the last graph, in which the perception of climate change is expressively described by the image of a vibrant line for the word “now”, much higher in the chart than the flat line for the word “later”.

Pau Waelder

[1] Roger Frank Malina, “Leonardo Timeshift“, Ars Electronica Catalog Archive.

[2] UCL Environment Institute.
[3] R. Hamblyn and M.J.Callanan. Data Soliloquies, 14.
[4] R. Hamblyn and M.J.Callanan. Data Soliloquies, 25.
[5] R. Hamblyn and M.J.Callanan. Data Soliloquies, 47.
[6] R. Hamblyn and M.J.Callanan. Data Soliloquies, 66.
[7] Martin John Callanan’s personal website. http://greyisgood.eu/

Review originally published on FurtherField

Martin John Callanan: On Systems and Processes (de sistemas y procesos)

art.es arte_contemporáneo_internacional a

Article and interview with Pau Waelder in Art.es #53

Download the full article as PDF

art.es international_contemporary_art announces the publication of its issue #53, with the following contents:

• art.es Project #44: Marina Núñez, Necrosis. (2013), digital image.
Cover and 22 inside pages. As always, an exclusive for the magazine (the originals belong to the art.es Collection).
Introductory text: Susana Cendán: Marina Núñez: “Everything has to do with the monsters”.

• Reflections:
– China’s Long March (4/10) (Zhang Fang).
– Meschac Gaba: Trying to change African society (Abdellah Karroum).
– A quantum reflection of Bakalhau (Cod Fish) (Fernando Galán).

• Media Art:
– Martin John Callanan: On Systems and Processes (Pau Waelder).

• Interview:
– Rafa Macarrón: “the solitude of man before the universe inmensity” (Fernando Galán).

• Film:
– Lipsett: a personal dilemma (Jorge D. González).

• Work_and_Word:
– Marco Ayres (Portugal)
– Simón Vega (El Salvador)
– Luis Gordillo (Spain)
– Pipo Hernández (Spain)
– Natxo Frisuelos (Spain)

• Exhibitions:
– The sublimation of detail: José Ferrero (Madrid) (Terry Berne).
– Bunga: beyond space: Carlos Bunga (Santa Mónica, California, USA) (Béatrice Chassepot).
– The descent into Marina Núñez’s hells (Valladolid, España) (Alfonso León).
– Reinterpreting art’s recent history: Roger Gustafsson (Madrid) (Fernando Galán).
– If you like small things: group show (A Coruña, España) (Nilo Casares).

• Museums
– Critical museology (2/2): On the limits of institutional art criticism (and critical museology as established discourse (Jesús Pedro Lorente)

• What’s going on in… Toronto? (John K. Grande).

• Books:
– “La Movida”, counterculture and normalization (La Movida, au nom du Père, des fils et du Todo Vale) (Juan Albarrán).

art.es is a 100 % bilingual magazine (English/Spanish) with contributions from the world over, and aimed at the entire world of genuinely contemporary art.

art.es focuses on established art as well as the latest creative iniciatives emerging from every corner of the planet. It informs and reflects on topics of interest, but with a fresh language and crisp design which are comprehensible to both specialists and amateurs. It has over 90 specialized collaborators and correspondents covering each and every geographical and thematic area of the contemporary art world.

Press release

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