Data on View, Nanterre Art Space

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La Terrasse, Nanterre Art Space
exhibition from 7 October to 23 December 2016
Opening on Friday 7 October 6-9 pm

Data on view Curators: Sandrine Moreau and Thierry Fournier

Works by Martin John Callanan, Marie-Pierre Duquoc Hasan Elahi, Oyvind Fahlstrom, Ashley Hunt, Mark Lombardi, Philippe Mairesse, Claire Mairieux, Julien Prévieux, Ward Shelley, Ali Tnani and Lukas Truniger Publications by James Bridle, Bureau d’études, Eli Commins, Albertine Meunier, On Kawara, Jacopo da Pontormo, Erica Scourti

Performance by Magali Desbazeilles

La Terrasse window: work in situ by Thierry Fournier Documentation space created with Benoît Ferchaud, La Revue Créatique and L’Agora, Nanterre Centre for Citizen Projects, Nanterre

Digital network: websites and movies by Mark Boulas, Brian Knappenberger, Laura Poitras, Sandy Smolan, Mareike Wegener, etc.

The exhibition Data on view brings together a selection of works that offer interpretations of public or personal data through drawing or code: graphs, drawings, network installations, sculptures, publications… These works are addressing various stakes, sensitive and poetic but also critical or political. They question in particular what we expect from data, and how these expectations are likely to define our vision of the world. In this way, the exhibition offers a historical perspective, ranging from Oyvind Fahlström or Mark Lombardi to young international artists, some of whose works are being shown here for the first time in France. It is supplemented by film and web site documentations, which deals with the issues of empowerment and the appropriation of data by citizens.

LA TERRASSE : NANTERRE ART SPACE 57 Boulevard Pesaro 92000 Nanterre, France
press contact: Sandrine Moreau, sandrine.moreau@nanterre.fr
www.nanterre.fr

Exhibition invite (FR) [PDF]

Exhibition leaflet (FR) [PDF]

Exhibition press release (EN) [PDF]

Exhibition leaflet (EN) [PDF]

Photos Thierry Fournier 2016

New Materialisms, Institute for Contemporary Art, Zagreb

New Materialisms (Station 3)

Alexei Blinov, Martin Callanan, Vladislav Knežević, Špela Petrič / Miha Turšič, Goran Trbuljak
15 June 2016 – 9 July 2016
Institute for Contemporary Art, Zagreb
curator Darko Fritz

The New Materialisms series of exhibitions aims at reflexive production tackling historically divergent art practices and discursive fields of Concrete and Conceptual Art related to them, as defined in the 1960s (especially through the notions of modernity and postmodernity), but also with understanding of those practices via perspectives of post-media approaches to art and the post-digital condition of contemporary society. In that sense, the project’s intention is to formulate dialogues among important authors of these previous periods and contemporary practitioners who work within a post-media context, mirroring “organic” conditions while assuming the design of aesthetic experience as important mechanism which has its agency in the process of creating the physical world.

New Materialisms explores the German philosopher Max Bense’s identification of the ‘aesthetic condition’, and his proposition that ‘the aesthetic condition is as material as the physical condition of any observed object’. His analysis pursued the goal of ‘programs for the production of aesthetic conditions’, using early computing machines. Materials relating to the infamous clash at a 1970 panel discussion between Bense and Joseph Beuys, which has been described as ‘the visibly spectacular finale to the project of a rational, mathematically oriented aesthetics’, are included in the project.

New Materialisms is a long-term program of exhibitions conceptualized in a collaborative process that has been taking place among grey) (area – space for contemporary and media art from Korčula, Croatia and HICA (Highlands Institute for Contemporary Art) from Scotland.

Artworks

Alexei Blinov: Open Source Vostok, 2013, installation, 3 holograms
Open Source Vostok invites the viewer on a journey back over 400,000 years, through four kilometers of ice, and through almost cosmic cold, to “touch” the untouchable, to feel the real albeit immaterial, and to see an exact optical copy of the ice core and freshly frozen water in the ancient glacial body of water – Lake Vostok. There is not one laboratory in the world that could provide all the conditions found under its icy suit of armor.Open Source Vostok uses this holographic technique to offer the viewer immediate access to one of the least accessible places on Earth, isolated from the surface for more than 15 million years.The artwork in collaboration with Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (St.Petersburg) and Scientific-production holographic laboratory (St. Petersburg).

Text Trends by Martin John Callanan looks at our perception of words and data when displayed in graphical form. Text Trends deals with the spectacularization of information. Using Google data it explores the vast search data of its users. The animation takes the content generated by search queries and reduces this process to its essential elements: search terms vs. frequency searched for over time, presented in the form of a line graph. The viewer watches the animation plot out the ebb and flow of a series of search terms generated over the last four years by internet users around the world. Pairs of words such as ‘now and later’, ‘summer and winter’ play out matter-of-factly, with all the passion of a market index. Instead of the hyper-interactivity of emerging news aggregators and information readers, Text Trends explores our perception of words though topics like time and politics. The work is an investigation into data use, encouraging criticism on
how the data is generated; prompting the question what does the data actually represent?

Installation Voyager/ non-human agent by Špela Petrič and Miha Turšič uses algorithm and data collected from the instruments from the spacecraft Voyager, which since 1977 has been travelling across the universe. Existing space programs focus mainly on understanding the farthest of our surroundings and on developing technological solutions, but tend to overlook the importance of implementing artistic development practices and methodologies in the form of a basic question: What is it like to be a human in space? Voyager/ Non-human Agent project investigates the possible art forms in outer space, a composite of art and science, and the processes of science culturalization.

Goran Trbuljak: Untitled, 2004, Hand counter, pedestal
The total number of persons who have attended the openings of all my individual exhibitions (those who have attended more than one opening have been counted once), 1970 until now

Vladislav Knežević: Binary Pitch 2013, experimental film, 7’, HD
Architecture of the auditorium is a physical, institutional space and the space which generates meaning. The key ideas from Max Bense’s ‘Aesthetics and Programming’ (1968) are coded in zeros and ones and animated as lifting and lowering the seats. In the geometry of a static shot, elements of architecture and space become the subject of a visual experiment. The video consists of three parts: activation (drawing the auditorium out) – coding (central part) – deactivation (drawing the auditorium in).

http://sivazona.hr/exhibitions/new-materialsims-station-3

Video DOC at Media Art Futures, Departure of All and Text Trends

Video DOC cinema programme at Media Art Futures, Murcia, 15-30 April 2015 features both Text Trends and documentary video of Departure of All.

In his book “The Imaginary Museum” (1965), André Malraux asserted that in the reproductions of artworks published in books and exhibition catalogues we can find more significant artworks that could be seen in the largest museum of the world. Internet has exponentially expanded Malraux’s Imaginary Museum and provided us with unprecedented access to a myriad of artworks. In digital art, the complexity or ephemerality of many artworks makes it difficult to see them in an exhibition and therefore it is the video documentation created by the artists themselves that allows us to discover their works. Two selections of documentation videos present an overview of the many faces of digital art today.

Abelardo Gil-Fournier
Alessandro Ludovico
Aram Bartholl
Aymeric Mansoux
Carlo Zanni
Chris Sugrue
Christa Sommerer
Clara Boj y Diego Díaz
Dave Griffiths
Evan Roth
F.A.T. Lab
Gordan Savicic
James Powderly
Laurent Mignonneau
Mar Canet
Marco Cadioli
Marloes de Valk
Martin John Callanan
Martina Höfflin
moddr_
Moisés Mañas
Paolo Cirio
Pascal Glissmann
Radamés Ajna
Sander Veenhof
Tempt1
Theo Watson
Thiago Hersan
Thierry Fournier
Tilman Reiff
Varvara Guljajeva
Volker Morawe
VR Urban
Zach Lieberman

Curated by Pau Waelder

See the whole film programme or the whole Festival programme or PDF

44th International Film Festival Rotterdam

The 44th International Film Festival Rotterdam will take place 21 January – 1 February 2015, and include Departure of All and Text Trends in the Signals: 24/7 programme.

24/7 will focus on the changing world & technology, and how the attention economy is affecting our lives, how we consume information and how it dominates not only our waking but also our sleeping moments. Our experience of time is mutating at the speed of light, due to the glass fibre and wireless networks that keep us entangled. How this affects our sense of reality now and its impact in the near future is one of the most important discussions in the world today.

In the late 1990s, when Google was barely one year old and was still a privately held company, its future CEO, Dr. Eric Schmidt was already articulating the context in which such a venture would flourish. Schmidt declared that the twenty-first century would be synonymous with what he called the ‘attention economy’, and that the dominant global corporations would be those that succeed in maximizing the number of ‘eyeballs’ they could consistently engage and control.

24/7 is focussed on stimulating discussion on this ‘attention economy’, the global thirst for information and the daily data consumption and mass synchronisation of work and leisure rhythms which are synonymous with this. We are working, communicating and consuming whenever and wherever we happen to be in the world. Divisions between night and day, between rest and work are gradually disappearing. Our experience of time is mutating at the speed of light, due to the glass fibre and wireless networks that keep us entangled.

Therefore 24/7 forces the audience to step out of the cinema, into hotels. A hotel is just like a cinema, a place where one checks in to step out of the daily routine. They are open 24/7 and strongly associated with our need for sleep. While examining the ever-changing world of the 21st Century, this programme challenges the traditional notion of a film ‘slot’ by raising the question of what we now class as a ‘normal duration’.

Films in Signals 24/7
Departure of All at IFFR
Text Trends at IFFR
Signals: 24/7 programme PDF

Made possible with support from the British Council Travel Grant Fund

Data Soliloquies book review on Furtherfield by Pau Waelder

Book review by Pau Waelder – 03/02/2010

Data Soliloquies is a book about the extraordinary cultural fluidity of scientific data

Data Soliloquies
Richard Hamblyn and Martin John Callanan
London: Slade Press, 2009
112 pages
ISBN 978-0903305044

Although much has been said about C.P. Snow’s concept of a “third culture”, we haven’t actually reached an understanding between the spheres of science and humanities. This is caused in part by the high degree of specialisation in each field, which usually prevents researchers from considering different perspectives, as well as the controversies that have arisen between academics, exemplified by publications such as Intellectual Impostures (1998) in which physicists Alan Sokal and Jean Bricmont criticise the “abuse” of scientific terminology by sociologists and philosophers. Yet there is a growing mutual dependency of both fields of knowledge, as the one hand our society is facing new problems and questions for which the sciences have adequate answers and on the other scientific research can no longer remain isolated from society. Some scientists, such as the astronomer Roger Frank Malina, have even argued that a “better science” will result from the interaction between art, science and technology. Malina presents as an example the “success of the artist in residence and art-science collaboration programs currently being established” [1], and considers the possibility of a “scientist in residence” program in art labs.

Data Soliloquies

Our relationship with the environment is certainly one of the main problems we are going to face during this century and it is also a subject that brings up the necessary communication between science and society. The UCL Environment Institute [2] was established in 2003 to promote an interdisciplinary approach to environmental research and make it available to a wider audience. While being representative of almost every discipline in the University College London, it lacked an interaction with the arts and humanities. This gap has been bridged by establishing an artist and writer residency program in collaboration with the Slade School of Fine Arts and the English Department. Among 100 applications, writer Richard Hamblyn and artist Martin John Callanan were chosen for the 2008-2009 academic year: Data Soliloquies is the result of their work.

Despite “belonging” to the field of art and humanities, neither Hamblyn nor Callanan are strangers to science and technology. Richard Hamblyn is an environmental writer and historian who has developed a particular interest in clouds, and Martin John Callanan is an artist whose remarkably conceptual work merges art and different types of media. This may be the cause that Data Soliloquies is by no means a shy penetration into a foreign field of knowledge but a solid discourse which presents a richly documented critique of the apparently ineffective ways in which scientists have made society aware of such a crucial problem as that of climate change. The title of the book has been borrowed for a term that Jon Adams, researcher at the London School of Economics, coined to refer to Michael Crichton’s novels, who uses “scientific” facts to give his imaginative plots an aura of credibility. With this reference, the authors state that the way scientific data is presented actually constitutes a narrative, an uncontested monologue: “…scientific graphs and images have powerful stories to tell, carrying much in the way of overt and implied narrative content (…) these stories are rarely interrupted or interrogated.”[3]

As the amount of data regularly stored in all sorts of digital supports increases exponentially, and new forms of data visualisation are developed, these “data monologues” become ubiquitous, while remaining unquestioned. In his text, Hamblyn exposes the inexactitude in some popular visualisations of scientific data, which have set aside accuracy in favour of providing a more eloquent image of what the gathered evidences are supposed to tell. On the one hand, Charles D. Keeling’s upward trending graph of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, which according to Hamblyn is “probably the most important data set in environmental science, and has become something of a freestanding scientific icon”[4], or Michael Mann’s controversial “Hockey Stick” graph are illustrative examples of the way in which information displays have developed their own narratives. On the other, the manipulation of data in order to obtain a more visually effective presentation, such as NASA’s exaggeration of scale in their images of the landscape of Venus or the use of false colours in the reproductions of satellite images, call for a questioning of the supposed objectivity in the information provided by scientific institutions.

Data Soliloquies

In the field of climate science, the stories that graphs and other visualisations can tell have become of great importance, as human activity has a direct impact on global warming, but this relation of cause and effect cannot be easily determined. As Hamblyn states: “climate change is the first major environmental crisis in which the experts appear more alarmed than the public” [5]. The catastrophism with which environmental issues are presented to the public generate a feeling of impotence, and thus any action that an individual can undertake seems ineffective. The quick and resolute reaction of both the population and the governments in the case of the “ozone hole” in 1985 points in the direction of finding a clear and compelling image of the effects of climate change. As Hamblyn underscores, this is not only a subject for engineers: “the reality of ongoing climate change has yet to be embraced as a stimulus to creativity –in the arts as well as the sciences– or as a permanent and inescapable part of human societal development” [6].

Data Soliloquies

Martin John Callanan took upon himself to develop a creative response to this issue, and has done so, not simply by creating images or objects but by depicting processes. He states: “I’m more interested in systems –systems that define how we live our lives” [6]. A quick look at his previous work [7] will show how appropriate this statement is: he has visited each and every station of the London underground, collected every command of the Photoshop application in his computer, officially changed his name (to the same he already had), gathered the front page of hundreds of newspapers from around the world and engaged himself in many other activities that are as systematic and mechanical as ironic, poetic or simply nihilistic. During his residency, Callanan created to main projects. The first one, Planetary Order, is a globe in which the patterns of the clouds on a particular date (February 6th, 2009) have been sculpted. The artist composed the readings of NASA’s cloud monitoring satellites in a virtual 3D computer model, which was then laser melted on a compacted nylon powder sphere at the Digital Manufacturing Centre at the UCL Bartlett Faculty of the Built Environment. The resulting object is a sculpture, an artwork more than any sort of model in the sense that it develops a discourse beyond the actual presentation of data. An impeccable white sphere textured by its subtle protuberances, the globe evokes the perfection of an ancient marble sculpture while presenting us with an uncommon view of the Earth, covered with clouds. The clouds, which are usually erased in the depictions of our planet in order to let us see the shapes of the continents (the land which is our dominion), become an icon of climate change and the image of an order which is, in all senses, above us. Callanan freezes the planetary order of clouds in an impossible map, a metaphorical object which appears to us as a faultless, yet fragile and inscrutable machine.

The second of Callanan’s artistic projects is the series Text Trends. Using Google data, the artist has collected the number of searches for selected terms related to climate change in a time range of several years (from 2004 to 2007-2008). With this data, he has generated a series of minimalistic graphs in which two jagged lines, one red and the other blue, cross the page describing the frequency of searches (or popularity) for two competing terms. The result resembles an electrocardiogram in which we can see the “life” of a particular word, as opposed to another, in a simple but eloquent dialogue of abstract forms. Callanan has chosen to confront terms in pairs such as “summer vs. winter”, “climate change vs. war on terror” or “global warming”. Simple as they may seem, the graphs are telling and constitute and visual summary of the book whilst suggesting many other reflections. The final conclusion is presented in the last graph, in which the perception of climate change is expressively described by the image of a vibrant line for the word “now”, much higher in the chart than the flat line for the word “later”.

Pau Waelder

[1] Roger Frank Malina, “Leonardo Timeshift“, Ars Electronica Catalog Archive.

[2] UCL Environment Institute.
[3] R. Hamblyn and M.J.Callanan. Data Soliloquies, 14.
[4] R. Hamblyn and M.J.Callanan. Data Soliloquies, 25.
[5] R. Hamblyn and M.J.Callanan. Data Soliloquies, 47.
[6] R. Hamblyn and M.J.Callanan. Data Soliloquies, 66.
[7] Martin John Callanan’s personal website. http://greyisgood.eu/

Review originally published on FurtherField

Data as Culture: Open Day 16 March

Data as Culture: Open Day

 

Your chance to get hold of issue #3 of Text Trends newspaper.

The Open Data Institute (ODI) and MzTEK invite you to the Data as Culture Open Day.

The Data as Culture collection is set in the offices of the ODI, and aims to bring tangible interventions into the
mass accretion of data around us. This is an opportunity to see the artworks in the collection and speak to the curators and some of the artists.

Informal presentations from 2.30pm – 4pm, refreshments provided.

Find out more about the artists and the collection visit: theodi.org/culture/collection

Data as Culture: Open Day
16 March 2013, 12pm – 6pm.
Open Data Institute, 3rd Floor, 65 Clifton Street, London, EC2A 4JE

Text Trends newspaper: Environmental

Text Trends newspaper environmental

The second issue of Text Trends newspaper, looking at environmental data, will be available in limited numbers from 14 January 2013 at The Open Data Institute.

Over the past twenty years, global climate change has emerged as the overarching narrative of our age, uniting a series of ongoing concerns about human relations with nature, the responsibilities of first world nations to those of the developing world, and the obligations of present to future generations. But if the climate change story entered the public realm as a data-driven scientific concept, it was quickly transformed into something that the ecologist William Cronon has called a ‘secular prophecy’, a grand narrative freighted with powerful, even transcendent languages and values. And though climate science can sometimes adopt the rhetoric of extreme quantification, it also — as has been seen throughout this book — relies on the qualitative values of words, images and metaphors. This can even happen simultaneously: during the discussions that led up to the IPCC’s Third Assessment Report of 2001, for example, a room full of scientists discussed for an entire week whether or not to include the three-word phrase ‘discernable human influence.’ Only three words, perhaps, but three extremely potent words (both qualitatively and quantitavely speaking), that between them tell a vast and potentially world-altering story.

Martin John Callanan’s ongoing Text Tends series offers a deadpan encounter with exactly this kind of quantification of language. Using Google data the series explores the vast mine of information that is generated by the search engine’s users, each animation taking the content generated by search queries and reducing the process to its essential elements: search terms vs. frequency of search over time, presented in the form of a line graph.

In the online manifestation of the Text Trends animations the viewer watches as the animations plot the ebb and flow of a series of paired search terms keyed into Google over the last ten years by Internet users around the world. In the case of the environment sequence featured here, pairs of words such as: ‘nature’ — ‘population’; ‘climate’ — ‘risk’; ‘consensus’ — ‘uncertainty’; ‘Keeling curve’ — ‘hockey stick’, spool out matter-of-factly, like a live market index, allowing the implied narrative content of these word comparisons (along with their accumulated cultural and emotional baggage) to play themselves out before us. In contrast to the hyperinteractivity of emerging news aggregators and information readers, Text Trends explores our perceptions of words presented as connotation-rich fragments of continually updated time-sensitive data.

As an investigation into both the generation and representation of data, Text Trends offers a visual critique of the spectacularization of information, a cultural tic that continues to generate the endless roll of statistically compromised wallpaper that surrounds so much public science debate, and which our book — Data Soliloquies — has in large part been about.

Richard Hamblyn
original version published in Data Soliloquies, UCL Environment Institute, 2009. ISBN 9780903305044

ISSN 2051-6126
ISBN 9781907829086

BYO Lunchtime Lectures at ODI: Data as Culture

11 January 2013, 1:00 pm – 1:45 pm
The Open Data Institute, 65 Clifton St, Shoreditch, London Borough of Hackney, EC2A, UK

Introducing Friday Lunchtime Lectures at the Open Data Institute.
You bring your lunch, we provide tea & coffee, an interesting talk,
and enough time to get back to your desk.

For our first lecture…

Curators of the ODI Data as Culture art commission, TED Senior Fellow,
Julie Freeman, and MzTEK co-founder, Sophie McDonald, will provide a
background of the data-driven art movement, why this commission is so
timely, and take you on a tour of the art works installed at the ODI
offices.

20Hz (2011)
Semiconductor

Body 01000010011011110110010001111001 (2012)
Stanza

Metrography (2012)
Benedikt Groß & Bertrand Clerc

Still Lifes and Oscillators 1 (2012)
Ben Garrod

Text Trends (2012)
Martin John Callanan

The Obelisk (2012)
Fabio Lattanzi Antinori

The SKOR Codex (2012)
La Société Anonyme

Three flames ate the sun, and big stars were seen (2012)
Phil Archer

Vending Machine (2009)
Ellie Harrison

To book your place sign up here

Text Trends newspaper series for the launch of The Open Data Institute

To celebrate the launch of The Open Data Institute, a new series of Text Trends in newspaper form will be available for  from November 2012 to May 2013 at the ODI HQ in London, and added to their art collection:

Semiconductor
Stanza
Benedikt Groß & Bertrand Clerc
Ben Garrod
Martin John Callanan
Fabio Lattanzi Antinori
La Société Anonyme
Phil Archer
Ellie Harrison

Data is driving decisions that shape our daily lives: from friends to governments, we are becoming more reliant on connected data. Global opinion is increasingly communicated through data-driven visuals. Personal well-being, sentiment and influence are continually monitored through data-harvesting devices. Knowledge at all levels and on all topics can be handed to anyone, at any time. Open data is shaping our society.

 

In curating the showcase for the ODI we wanted to select a range of works that would not just reflect different data sources, but that would challenge our understanding of what data is, and how it may affect and reflect our lives. We were privileged in the breadth of content and the quality of work that was submitted as part of the open call, allowing for scope to select works that could comment on, complement and challenge perceptions in a coherent collection. The works range from geomagnetic data visualisations, to wall painted cellular automata, to tabloid newspapers of search term trend graphs – all tangible interventions into the mass accretion of data around us.

 

In Phil Archer’s work data comes from the depths of time, as symbolic representations of solar eclipses dating from 2137 BCE to 1991 CE are sketched in ultraviolet light. In contrast, ‘The SKOR Codex’ looks to preserve data for the distant future. The book, printed by La Société Anonyme, contains encoded binary information that has been carefully fabricated to last for over 1,000 years.

 

The works span space as well as time, in ‘20Hz’, geo-magnetic storm measurements are taken from the Earth’s upper atmosphere, while ‘Metrography’ portrays the London Underground transit map as a spatial reality – data defining specious geography. In ‘Still Lifes and Oscillators 1’ the mistreatment of image data by reformatting, reducing, and regenerating, questions the representation of visual data as the ultra-processed image, as the final stable state from a cellular automata cycle is painted back onto the space it was captured from.

 

Real-time environmental data is embodied in Stanza’s life-size sculpture assembled from computer components and acrylic slices of his own physique. In ‘Body 01000010011011110110010001111001’ the urban environment provides a dynamic flickering and clicking sentience to the otherwise inert structure, reflecting the personal level of influence data has on an individual, whereas Martin John Callanan’s ‘Text Trends’ reflects our actions en masse.

 

Works by Ellie Harrison and Fabio Lattanzi Antinori embody the current global political environment that is in constant flux, barely noticed on a personal scale, but that potentially have significant consequences for each of us.

 

As data becomes more accessible to artists, as it opens up for use as a raw material, we are seeing more of its integration into works that explore environmental socio-political and economic aspects of society. By utilising data in an experiential way, this selection of works pulls data out of the virtual domain and into our physical world. We hope the exhibition provokes discussion around what open data is, how it informs and affects us, and how we interpret it in a way that is meaningful.

 

MzTEK worked with the ODI to encourage a broad spectrum of applicants, and in the interest of openness we will release the demographic data from the submission process.

 

We would like to thank the ODI for all the support we have received, and for co-creating this with us.

Finally, we would like to thank all of the artists involved for their thought provoking works and their professionalism in the production of this collection.

Julie Freeman & Sophie McDonald, MzTEK, November 2012

Some of the other artworks:

Merkske at London Art Book Fair, Whitchapel Gallery, 21–23 September 2012

London Art Book Fair

Merkske will be with Slade Press for the fourth edition of The London Art Book Fair at the Whitechapel Gallery, it takes place from the 21–23 September 2012.

Merkske published Text Trends: Though Text Trends, Martin John Callanan deals with the spectacularization of information. Using Google data he explores the vast search data of its users. An animation takes the content generated by search queries and reduces this process to its essential elements: search terms vs. frequency searched for over time, presented in the form of a line graph, 16 of which are reproduced in this book.

Global, solo exhibition at Casal Solleric, March – June 2012


A solo exhibition across six spaces at Casal Solleric, the city of Palma’s contemporary art gallery and archive, including two new works.




Ten years in the making, and shown here for the fist time, Grounds, an archive of thousands of photographs of the ground in locations important to society. A set of 200 displayed across three slide projectors.



Wars During My Life Time, a new work for this exhibition, a newspaper listing – in Catalan – all wars fought during my lifetime.


I Wanted to See All of the News From Today, amasses from across the internet, the front pages of over 960 newspapers from around the world and displays these images within the space of a single scrolling display.

Text Trends, an animation which takes the content generated by search queries and reduces this process to its essential elements: search terms vs. frequency searched for over time, presented in the form of a line graph.

Gallery information sheet in English, Catalan and Castellano [PDF]

Curated by Pau Waelder and Fernando Gómez as part of (HIPER)vincles

Text Trends book out now with Merkske

Merkske, Text Trends, Martin John Callanan

Though Text Trends, Martin John Callanan deals with the spectacularization of information. Using Google data he explores the vast search data of its users. An animation takes the content generated by search queries and reduces this process to its essential elements: search terms vs. frequency searched for over time, presented in the form of a line graph, 16 of which are reproduced in this book.

The Achive of Digital Art (Database of Virtual Art)

Screen shot 2013-07-26 at 12.12.42

Five works accessioned to The Achive of Digital Art (Database of Virtual Art) documents the rapidly evolving field of digital installation art. This complex, research-oriented overview of immersive, interactive, telematic and genetic art has been developed in cooperation with established media artists, researchers and institutions. The web-based, cost-free instrument – appropriate to the needs of process art – allows individuals to post material themselves. Compiling video documentation, technical data, interfaces, displays, and literature offers a unique answer to the needs of the field. All works can be linked with exhibiting institutions, events and bibliographical references. Over time the richly interlinked data will also serve as a predecessor for the crucial systematic preservation of this art of our time.

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